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  • 1.
    Anstey, Tim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Hughes, Rolf
    Konstfack.
    Architecture and Authorship2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Architecture and Authorship comprises 16 essays that explore issues of authorship, attribution and intellectual property in architecture. The book examines how individual architects and movements, from the fifteenth century onwards, have endeavoured to maintain their status by defending what they see as their own unique territory—the origins and intentions of their work, and their signature style.

  • 2.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    A Performative mode of writing place: Out and about the Rosenlund Park, Stockholm, 2008–20102012In: Emergent Writing Methodologies in Feminist Studies / [ed] Mona Livholts, Taylor & Francis, 2012, p. 133-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Architecture and the dilemma of identity: a study of the ’weak subject’ in Marcel Proust1997In: The interpretation of culture and the culture of interpretation / editors: Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Erik Peurell, Vol. S. [63]-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Arkitekturen i litteraturen: Att figurera (i sommarparadisets) arkitektur2008In: Arkitektur: byggnad, interiör, plan, landskap, ISSN 0004-2021, no 4, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Arkitekturforskningens landskap – Landscapes of Architectural Research2002In: Nordic Journal of Achitectural Research, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Att drömma om regnbågens slut och horisontens faktiska vara.1996In: Arkitektur, Vol. 1996:2, s. 49-51 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Automata, perspective and music: poetic instruments in the written garden of Salomon de Caus1995Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Cities and films2003In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Debate on Slussen project2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    En fot i gräset en droppe regn / A foot in the grass, a drop of rain2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Experience as imagined: Writing the Landscape garden2006In: Experiencing the Garden in the 18th Century / [ed] Ed. M.L. Calder, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Feminism as Architecture2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Fluttering butterflies, a dusty road, and a muddy stone: Criticality in distraction2007In: Critical Architecture / [ed] Jane Rendell, Jonathan Hill, Murray Fraser, Mark Dorrian, London: Routledge, 2007, 1, p. 135-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Buildings are appropriated in a twofold manner: by use and by perceptions –or rather by touch and sight. Such appropriation cannot be understood in terms of the attentive concentration of a tourist before a famous building.”[1]

     

    In this passage of “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” Walter Benjamin suggests that the experience of architecture points humanity to a very particular and acutely relevant mode of appropriation, ‘mastered’ by habit and by impressions caught in ‘an incidental fashion’. His observation, that architecture shies away from attentive contemplation, and demands to be perceived rather as a back-drop to life than as an object in life, points to an interesting dilemma facing the architectural critic: If the object under debate, architecture, offers itself as a mere background event, appropriated primarily by habitual use and occasionally by attentive visual perception, how are we to capture it? How could such an delicate phenomena be scrutinized if it cannot be held firmly before the eyes of the reader? It appears nearly impossible to represent and to critically engage with. Yet, as architectural critics, we are challenged and inspired to experiment with this condition. We construct in different ways temporary frames or lenses through which a critical point can be perceived. The phenomena of architecture often then comes into focus, for a moment, then fades away again.

     

    My contribution to the ‘Critical Architecture’ volume is propositional: it performs a mode of writing in architecture which consciously address the dilemma of capturing an architecture, or other spatial phenomena, for the purposes of a critical engagement with the reader, while essentially remaining ‘out of focus’ (in the margin).

     

    The essay takes place in Haga Park, Stockholm. This park constitutes one of the most interesting examples of 18th century landscape gardening in Stockholm. The sites have however been chosen on the basis of rather vague (unimportant) personal memories from my own ‘distracted’ uses of this park as a child and teenager. Memories of past use are thus called forth by writing, in an attempt to ‘defocus’ the scholarly gaze of the grown-up critic. It is approached as an actual and a remembered place. The park is written as a site of everyday experience, not in the eighteenth century, not for Stockholmers today, but for myself (here ‘the distracted critic’). What is the Haga Park that follows me around? - the remembered place that I store in my mind, a place which expands, evolves, even disappears in part, as her time and life goes on.

     

    The author of the essay relates to the reader an account of a Haga Park that obliges the reader to follow her train of thought, which moves between remembered and present time, as well as reflecting on the particular mode in which it is being told and why. It addresses the notion of distracted experience and its critical and political function for Walter Benjamin. The text thus make a double-layered performance. The particular effect of distractedness here is the allowance it makes for the telling of parallel stories, and of making observations sometimes by association rather than argument or narrative.[2] There is thus ample space for the reader herself to assume a critical position in relation to the landscape that is written for her imagination. But the narrating voice also carefully guides the reader among these impressions and creates a critical space where some conclusions are drawn and arguments are put forward.

     

    In what way might the resulting text convey a distracted mode of experience? By drawing on personal memories and experiences as a primary source, the author can only hope that the resulting account might bear a significant relation to potential readers who can recognize in it ways of experiencing and understanding particular places and landscapes. The choice of such an auto-biographical method is based on a recognition of the importance of a cultural specificity in any discussion of spatial experience.[3] While these kinds of sources in some sense are always unique, the process of writing them, giving in some sense a ‘faithful’ account, is of course wholly dependent on  mediation. As soon as a memory is evoked and retold, it is severed from any original ‘impression’, which is also the only way that it may ever become useful. The distracted nature of the essay is also present in the way that it makes use of both a particular place, Haga Park, and a particular person’s experiences, the authors, without having any ambition of giving any complete or truly exhaustive account of either. It employs them merely to point at and give materiality to certain phenomena and experiences, which in turn demands the evocation of a certain interest in both the specific park and the author. The reading act might then in itself provoke a certain uneasiness, another level of distraction, which has to be carefully balanced (and obviously also stops some readers from ever reading through).

     

    _____

     

    1. Walter Benjamin “ The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” in Illuminations, Schocken Books, 1968, p 240.

     

    [2] If one might write in such a way that brings to the surface several phenomena at once, and at the same time the presence of a distracted subject amidst all this, a text that reflects the filmic effect Benjamin relates, could be a possible result. This is not undone. Even Benjamin had several examples among his contemporaries. Virginia Woolf’s stream-of-consciousness writing in novels such as The Waves, Mrs Dalloway, Jacob’s Room for example, appear to be aiming for a similar effect. At the same time her essay-writing allows for considerably less distraction.

    [3] Other modes of working with such a specificity (experience grounded in a named, gendered etc, subject) may be through discussing characters from, film, literature etc, or documentary characters, based on interviews, and relating the accounts of other individuals thaw we know or come to know.

  • 14.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Four essays framed: (questions of imagination, interpretation and representation in architecture)1997Book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Genusperspektiv på arkitektur, landskap och offentliga rum / Gender perspectives on architecture, landscape, and public space2006In: Arkitektur: byggnad, interiör, plan, landskap, ISSN 0004-2021Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Handbok för framtidens arkitektur2001Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Housing the Swedish Summer (Utopia in Reverse?)2008In: Nonsite to Celebration Park: essays on art and the politics of space / [ed] Edward Whittaker, Alex Landrum, Bath Spa University , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    In the corner of perception: Spatial experience in distraction2005In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 9, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Interview on landscape and literature featuring Grillner and Monika Fagerholm2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Interview on Sigurd Lewerentz2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Kritik och förströelse (vi befinner oss i Hagaparken, Stockholm)2005In: Varje dags arkitektur / [ed] Ed. Christina Engfors, Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet , 2005, p. 38-56Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Lewerentz2002In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Nature’s lovers: Design and Authorship in the 18th century landscape garden2007In: Architecture and authorship / [ed] Tim Anstey, Katja Grillner, Rolf Hughes, London: Black Dog Publishing, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Nature’s lovers: Figuring the Landscape Designer2007Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    När arkitektur är arkitektur är arkitektur konst2001In: Det transparenta huset: Om glas och ljus i konst och arkitektur ... / [ed] Tomas Lauri, Stockholm: Statens konstråd , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Out of focus (in distraction)2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Out of focus (in distraction)” in Spatial Imagination2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture.
    Ramble, linger and gaze2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Ramble, linger, and gaze explores a method of architecturalresearch based on narrative dialogue and examines the gardentheories and lite­rary garden representations of ThomasWhately (Observations on Modern gardening 1770) and JosephHeely (Letters on the Beauties of Hagley, Envil, and theLeasowes 1777). The thesis has the form of a narrated dialoguebetween these two writers and the narrator, and it is situatedat Hagley Park, Worchestershire, England. The work does nothave a strictly art-historical aim, but wishes to provide newinsights in the field of archi­tectural research on both amethodological and an historical level. While the dialogicalmode of writing is explored as an hermeneutical research methodfor the field of architec­tural history and theory, thetext in itself discloses a world of reflec­tions and ideasthat surrounded the English landscape garden in the1770’s, and engages, from our present-daypo­si­tion, in a dialogue with that world.

    The beginnings of diverse and opposing phenomena of our timecan be traced to the culture of the 18th century. Ascon­structions of the 18th century, Hagley Park, as wellas Whately and Heely’s texts, lead us closer to thehorizons of the indi­viduals and the society that producedit. But the landscape gar­den and the texts, as they standto­day, are also sites for alter­nativeepistemological models. Through its fictional character, thelandscape garden provides a possibility to move withininterpretative layers and spiralling horizons. It celebrates apoint of view on the move, both literally (physically) andimagi­natively. The dissertation demonstrates thepossibilities of arti­culating this spatio-temporalphenomenon within the field of architectural research.

  • 29.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Reflecting, Writing, and Forgetting: Method in art- and design-based research2008In: Geist, ISSN 1651-3991, no 11,12,14, p. 212-219Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Reflective depth on the surface of reality: thesis project1995Book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Shifting Place Perceptions: Performative Modes of Site Writing2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Shifting Place Perceptions: Performative Modes of Site-WritingIn: Writing Architecture: Innovations in the textual and visual Criique of Buildings / [ed] Naomi Stead, Brisbane Institute for Modern ArtChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The Picturesque: Architecture, disgust and other irregularities2008In: Journal of Architecture, ISSN 1360-2365, E-ISSN 1466-4410, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 669-673Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part I - fictional reality in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:1), s. 55-67 : ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    The primacy of perplexion: working architecture through a distracted order of experience : part II - fictional selves in search...1995In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, Vol. 1995 (8:2), s. 85-107 . ill.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The Seduction of Landscape2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture.
    The Textual Artefact in Research by Architectural Design2004In: Working Papers in Art and Design, ISSN 1466-4917, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Tomaskyrkan i Vällingby: en analys av Peter Celsings byggnad : proseminarieuppsats i Konstvetenskap vid Stockholms universite...1992Book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Under White Cover – Performing critical practices in architecture toda2002Other (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    UR Samtiden - Humanisterna och framtidssamhället [Elektronisk resurs]: Kan humanisterna förändra samhället?2011Other (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Urban space at Arlanda2006In: Upsala Nya Tidning, ISSN 1104-0173Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Varför finns det inga kvinnliga arkitekter?” [Why are there no women architects?]2003In: Arkitekturmuseets tidning, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Where are we now?: Situated Practices in Reflexive Academic Writing2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Writing and Landscape – Setting Scenes for Critical Reflection2003In: Journal of Architecture, ISSN 1360-2365, E-ISSN 1466-4410, Vol. 8, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Writing in Architecture2007Other (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Writing Place: An Architectural Technique?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Burroughs, Brady
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Incompatible Modalities Salon2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Glembrandt, PerWallenstein, Sven-Olov
    Startpunkter: experimentell forskning inom arkitektur och design = Beginnings : experimental research in architecture and design2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    01.AKAD – EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH IN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN – BEGINNINGS is the first in a series of publications from AKAD, which aim to provoke, promote and discuss new and critically experimental research by architecture and design. This first book is structured around four themes arising from projects initiated within AKAD with financial support from the Swedish Research Council. It includes critical essays and presentations of experimental design and writing projects. The contributors are architects, designers and scholars based in Sweden, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, UK, and USA.

  • 49.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Hughes, Rolf
    Den kritiska texten i arkitektur-, konst- och arkitekturforskning2009In: Årsbok KFoU 2009 Konst och forskningspolitik, Vetenskapsrådet , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Grillner, Katja
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Hughes, Rolf
    Room within a view - a conversation on writing and architecture2006In: OASE, ISSN 0169-6238, Vol. 70, p. 56-69Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 53
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