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  • 1.
    Balfors, Berit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Eriksson, Linnea
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    Lundberg, Kristina
    Robinson, Tobias
    Strategisk miljöbedömning för nationell transportplanering med fokus på inriktningsunderlaget2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport utgör ett inspel till Trafikverket i en analys om hur strategisk miljöbedömning kan användas i den statliga transportplaneringens tidiga skeden med fokus på inriktningsunderlaget. Rapporten är framtaget inom projektet ”TRAMP- Är långsiktig transportplanering och miljöbedömning kompatibla processer?” som är ett forsknings- och innovationsprojekt (FoI), finansierat av Trafikverket under perioden 2017 - 2019. Deltagande forskare i projektet är Berit Balfors och Ulrika Gunnarsson-Östling, KTH, Kristina Lundberg och Tobias Robinson, Ecoloop, Karolina Isaksson och Linnea Eriksson, VTI.

    FoI-projektet har planerats för att successivt leverera användbart underlag till Trafikverket. Föreliggande rapport är ett underlag inför Trafikverkets arbete med att ta fram ett inriktningsunderlag.

  • 2.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    Hornborg, Alf
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Öhlund, Erika
    Därför är ekonomisk tillväxt en risk2016In: Dagens samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511, article id 9 marsArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Miljörättvisa: ett nytt perspektiv i svensk planering2007In: PLAN – Tidskrift för Samhällplanering, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den senaste tiden har miljö- och klimatfrågor varit ett hett ämne i samhällsdebatten. Framförallt diskuteras hur växthuseffekten kan hanteras och hur system för utsläppsrätter bäst organiseras. Sällan ställs frågor om vilka som orsakar miljöproblem och vilka som drabbas av dem. Och vem som definierar vad som betraktas som akuta miljöproblem. Detta är frågor som uppmärksammas i forskning om miljörättvisa – ett fält på frammarsch i Sverige.

  • 4.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI.
    Exploring environmental justice in Sweden: How to improve planning for environmental sustainability and social equity in an “eco-friendly” context2008In: Projections, ISSN 1934-9688, E-ISSN 1934-9696, Vol. 8, p. 68-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental challenges, especially climate change, are highly discussed topics in the Swedish public debate, but questions about who is causing the problems and who is affected by them are seldom asked. This also applies to questions of who defines what should be regarded as acute environmental problems and what constitutes high-quality environments. This paper explores how environmental (in)justice issues can be framed in a Swedish social context, drawing from three cases: municipal promotion of eco-friendly lifestyles, large-scale infrastructure planning, and planners’ attitudes towards justice. The three cases deal not only with distributional, procedural, and substantive aspects of justice, as is common within the US environmental justice framework, but also with discursive dimensions of justice. We argue that elucidating such examples of environmental (in)justices is crucial to nuance the mainstream, consensus-oriented sustainability discourse in Sweden.

  • 5.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Futurist Feminist Political Ecology: Rewriting Stockholm’s Vision 20302017In: Feminist Futures of Spatial Practice: Materialisms, Activisms, Dialogues, Pedagogies, Projections / [ed] Meike Schalk, Thérèse Kristiansson, Ramia Mazé, Baunach DE: AADR / Spurbuchverlag , 2017, p. 301-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Futurist Feminist Political Ecology: Rewriting Stockholm’s Vision 20302017In: Feminist Futures of Spatial Practice: Materialisms, Activisms, Dialogues, Pedagogies, Projections / [ed] Meike Schalk, Thérèse Kristiansson, Ramia Mazé, Baunach DE: AADR / Spurbuchverlag , 2017, p. 301-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Low-carbon futures for a Swedish society beyond GDP growthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how different backcasting scenarios for developments beyond traditional GDP growth 2050,  in Sweden may fulfill a climate goal corresponding to keeping global warming to a maximum 1.5 degrees with 50% likelihood. This corresponds to  a 92% decrease of GHG emissions from Swedish consumption from today’s level. The four scenarios illustrate different strategies: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The aim is to further precise and quantify the scenario narratives with a focus on GHG emissions occurring as a result of Swedish consumption, both private and public. Preliminary results show that, as we assume that Sweden is fossil-free 2050, particular areas of attention are diets, air travel, emission intensities in other countries and the level of imports.. Potential implications for other environmental goals are discussed.

  • 8.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Arushanyan, Yevgenia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ljungren Söderman, Maria
    Sahlin, Jenny
    Stenmarck, Åsa
    Sundberg, Johan
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle.
    Forsfält, Tomas
    Guath, Mona
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 841-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: “Information”; “Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials”; “Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems”; “Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals”, “Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures”; and “Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services”. Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

  • 9.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Sustainable development goals for cities2017In: Connecting the dots by obstacles? Friction and traction ahead for the SRIA urban transitions pathways / [ed] Bylund, Jonas, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gunnarsson, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    In the Streets of Zanzibar: Constructions of Gender and Place2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies the access and use of public spaces from a gender perspective, with Zanzibar Stone Town as a case study. The thesis brings together and discusses several theories that might explain the access and use of public spaces from a gender perspective; planning theory, theories about public space, theories about how places are gendered and Islam since the case study is carried out in a Muslim area. Moreover, the thesis takes a starting point in a feminist scholarship. The discussion shows that places and gender are constructed over and over again. Today, women are sub-ordinated men and have less access to public space, but this is a constructed fact. Since culture is not static, subordination of women can be changed into equality between women and men. However, the task is not simple and one might wonder whether spatial planners can do anything at all. This thesis argues that planners can put their piece to the jigsaw. They can facilitate a planning process that takes power relations into consideration and they can question the social and cultural constructions of gender and place.

  • 11.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mellan ekologi och tillväxt: miljöpolitiska handlingsprogram i Stockholm 1976-20122013In: Du sköna nya stad: Privatisering, miljö och EU i Stockholmspolitiken / [ed] Torbjörn Nilsson, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag, 2013, p. 117-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Creating Feminist Futures2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Feministiska framtidsstudier2012In: Att uforska framtiden / [ed] Susanne Alm, Joakim Palme & Erik Westholm, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gender in futures: A study of gender and feminist papers published in Futures, 1969-20092011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 1029-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews and discusses papers related to women's studies, gender or feminist perspectives, published in the scientific journal Futures. The aim is to provide new understandings and remapping of futures studies by capturing how gender is created and understood in this field. The gender/feminist criticism of futures studies mainly relates to the field being male-dominated and male biased, which means that the future is seen as already colonised by men. When synthesising the insights from all 78 papers focusing on futures studies and feminism, gender or women, four conclusions are especially striking: (1) Women and non-Westerners are generally excluded from professional futures studies activities and so are feminist issues or issues of particular relevance for women. (2) Futures studies usually make no attempts to reveal underlying assumptions, i.e. often lack a critical and reflexive perspective, which is needed in order to add a critical feminist perspective and envision feminist futures. (3) Feminist futures are needed as a contrast to hegemonic male and Western technology-orientated futures. Feminist futures are diverse, but focus the well-being of all humans. (4) Futures studies often view women as victims, rather than as drivers for change, which means that their alternative futures are often ignored.

  • 15.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gendered development and possibilities for alternative feminist futuresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the future is not disconnected, but rooted in the past and the present, images of futures will inevitable bear traces of yesterday as well as today’s zeitgeist. There is a risk of institutions, such as gender perceptions, being selfreinforcing. This paper looks closer at three Swedish regional growth programs to see whether those future oriented documents are gendered, in what ways and also if there are ways of working with futures studies that could enhance the possibility for a gender perspective on the future. Futures studies have a history of facilitating discussions about what future is wanted, but most often without a gender perspective. Feminist studies on the other hand belong to a critical tradition and do most often not suggest solutions. By discussing the possibility of integrating a gender perspective on the future this paper can give fuel to planning and futures studies as well as feminist research.

  • 16.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gendered Futures?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the future is not disconnected, but rooted in the past and the present, images of futures will inevitable bear traces of yesterday as well as today’s zeitgeist. There is thus a risk of institutions, such as gender perceptions, being selfreinforcing. This paper looks closer at three Swedish regional growth programmes to see whether those future oriented documents are gendered, in what ways and also if there are ways of working with futures studies that could enhance the possibility for a gender perspective on the future. Futures studies have a history of facilitating discussions about what future is wanted, but most often without a gender perspective. Feminist studies on the other hand belong to a critical tradition and do not suggest solutions. By discussing the possibility of integrating a gender perspective on the future this paper can give fuel to planning and futures studies as well as feminist research.

  • 17.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Gendered Futures? 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the future is not a disconnected end-state, but rooted in both the past and the present [2, p. 225], images of the future will inevitable bear traces of yesterday as well as today’s zeitgeist. There is thus a risk of institutions, such as gender perceptions, being selfreinforcing. This paper looks closer at three Swedish regional growth programs to see whether those future oriented documents are gendered, in what ways and also if there are ways of working with futures studies [3] that could enhance the possibility for a gender perspective on the future. Futures studies have a history of facilitating discussions about what future is wanted, but most often without a gender perspective. This is a lack since many societal changes will have gendered consequences. It is in the present we can change the future, and even though the future will offer something we cannot think of [4], planners is one group among other influencing what direction society develops in. Even if many feminists agree upon ideas and ways of analysing today’s norms, Gemzöe [5, p. 24] writes that there are disagreements on what means are useful to reach the goal and also about how extensive changes are possible in a society. Also, it is difficult to agree upon a goal. Even though the present paper does not define a feminist utopia, it discusses the possibility of integrating a gender perspective on the future and could therefore give fuel to both futures studies and feminist research.

  • 18.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Just Sustainable Futures: Gender and Environmental Justice Considerations in Planning2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes and deepens knowledge on long-term planning for sustain­able development through exploring environ­mental justice and gender discourses in planning and futures studies. It also suggests ways of working with those issues.

    Environmental justice is explored through discussions with planners in Stockholm, Sweden, and through looking at images of future Stockholm and the environmental justice implications of these. These studies show how environ­mental justice issues can be manifested in a Swedish urban context and discuss how sustainable development and environmental justice can be in­creased, operationalised and politicised in planning. One key contri­bution of the thesis is in identifying the need to address proce­dural and outcomes values in both planning and futures studies.

    Gender discourses are explored through analysing papers published in the journal Futures and through an examination of Swedish Regional Growth Programmes. The feminist criticism of futures studies mainly relates to the field being male-dominated and male-biased, which means that the future is seen as already colonised by men, that futures studies generally do not work with feminist issues or issues of particular relevance for women, and that they often lack a critical and reflexive perspective. There is therefore a call for feminist futures as a contrast to hegemonic male and Western technology-orientated futures. The case of the Swedish Regional Growth Programmes shows that gender inequality is often viewed as a problem of unequal rights and possibilities. This liberal view on gender equality has made it rather easy for gender equality advocates to voice demands, e.g. for the inclusion of both women and men in decision-making processes, but the traditional male norm is not challenged. If a different response is required, other ways of describing the problem of gender inequalities must be facilitated. One way to open up different ways of describing the problem and to describe desirable futures could be the use of scenarios.

    Planning for just, sustainable futures means acknowledging process values, but also content (giving nature a voice!). It also means politicising planning. There are a number of desirable futures, and when this is clarified the political content of planning is revealed. These different images of the future can be evaluated in terms of environmental justice, gender perspective or any specific environmental aspect, e.g. biodiversity, which indicates that different futures are differently good for nature and/or different societal groups.

  • 19.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kulturarv och attraktivitet: En studie av Ales stenar och Västergötlands museum2005Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Politicising planning through images of the future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One major challenge in contemporary research about planning is how to change societies in a more sustainable direction. However, in the last decades of planning research and practice for sustainable urban development, more radical transformations have been rare. Instead, planning for sustainable development is viewed as something that can be achieved within society’s current frames (Bradley, 2009; Keil, 2007). However, futures studies often pro­pose radical changes in terms of technological development and behavioural change to approach sustainable development, but social structures such as the vulnerability of different societal groups to environmental problems and gender roles are seldom explicitly analysed. The focus is typically on changing physical or technical aspects, but without asking who should change or highlighting social structures (Wangel, 2011).

     

    The aim of this paper is to contribute new knowledge and deepen existing knowledge on long-term planning for sustainable development through merging planning with a critical futures studies perspective. This paper thereby proposes a more prescriptive postmodern planning and highlights both process and outcome.

     

    By suggesting the Just City approach, Fainstein (2000; 2010) also falls within the more prescriptive postmodern tradition. The Just City approach is a ‘normative position concerning the distribution of social benefits’ (Fainstein, 2000:467). It highlights process values and desirable out­comes. Thus, it recognises that just processes do not necessarily result in just out­comes, an issue which is also discussed by e.g. Bradley et al. (2008), Larsen and Gunnarsson-Östling (2009) and Gunnarsson-Östling and Höjer (2011).

     

    In the view of Fainstein (2000; 2010), the purpose is to recommend nonreformist reforms and thus improvements should be made within the current structures. Fainstein (2010:20) denotes this as a form of ‘realistic utopia­nism’. Thus, ‘[t]he discussion does not go so far as to investi­gate the broader concept of the good city’ (Fainstein, 2010:58) and e.g. environ­mental issues are not considered.

     

    Harvey (2009) is critical towards the approach of acting within the capitalist regime and questions capital accumulation and economic growth as prime targets in city development. He claims that the question of what city we desire is inseparable from what kind of people we want to become. He thereby approaches transformative futures studies. The field of futures studies is characterised by plurality regarding research approaches and one way of classifying those different approaches is that they respond to one of the three questions ‘what will happen’, ‘what can happen’ and ‘how can a specific target be reached’. They thereby belong to the three categories predictive, explorative and normative scenarios (Börjeson et al., 2006).

    Normative scenarios in turn can be divided into preserving and transforming scenarios, where preserving scenarios depict images of the future built on today’s societal structures (Börjeson et al., 2006:728-729). In transforming scenarios the goals are seen as very difficult to reach within today’s structures and major societal changes are therefore seen as necessary.

     

    One form of transforming scenario studies is backcasting. Robinson (1990:822) writes that ‘[t]he major distinguishing characteristic of backcasting analyses is a concern, not with what futures are likely to happen, but with how desirable futures can be attained’. Dreborg (1996:814) states that back­casting is especially useful for ‘long-term complex issues, involving many aspects of society as well as technological innovations and change’.

     

    However, futures studies often lack a critical and reflexive perspective (Gunnarsson-Östling, 2011). Inspiration for critical and transforming sustainable futures could instead be found within the field of political ecology where researchers have also called for alternatives. Swyngedouw (2007) sees the need for imagining and naming socio­environ­mental futures and Keil (2007:57) notes that radical change is needed and proposes a radical urban political ecology, meaning that sustain­ability cannot be achieved within capitalism as we know it.

     

    This paper highlights normative scenarios as a way of clarifying political dimensions of planning and visioning about sustain­able futures. They can be a way of depicting antagonistic futures.

     

     

     

    References

     

    Börjeson, L., M. Höjer, K.-H. Dreborg, T. Ekvall and G. Finnveden (2006) "Scenario types and techniques: Towards a user's guide." Futures 38:723-739.

    Bradley, K. (2009) Just Environments: Politicising Sustainable Urban Development. PhD thesis, Stockholm: KTH.

    Bradley, K., U. Gunnarsson-Östling and K. Isaksson (2008) "Exploring Environmental Justice in Sweden - How to Improve Planning for Environmental Sustainability and Social Equity in an "Eco-Friendly" Context." Projections: MIT Journal of Planning 8:68-81.

    Dreborg, K.-H. (1996) "Essence of backcasting." Futures 28:813-828.

    Fainstein, S. S. (2000) "New Directions in Planning Theory." Urban Affairs Review 35:451-478.

    Fainstein, S. S. (2010) The Just City. New York: Cornell University Press.

    Gunnarsson-Östling, U. (2011) Just Sustainable Futures: Gender and Environmental Justice Considerations in Planning. PhD thesis, Stockholm: KTH - Royal Institute of Technology.

    Gunnarsson-Östling, U. and M. Höjer (2011) "Scenario Planning for Sustainability in Stockholm, Sweden: Environmental Justice Considerations." International Journal of Urban and Regional Research Forthcoming.

    Harvey, D. (2009) "The right to the Just City." in Searching for the just city: Debates un urban theory and practice, edited by Marcuse, P., J. Connolly, J. Novy, I. Olivo, C. Potter and J. Steil. Abingdon: Routledge.

    Keil, R. (2007) "Sustaining Modernity, Modernizing Nature." in The Sustainable Development Paradox: Urban Political Economy in the United States, edited by Krueger, R. and D. Gibbs. New York: Guilford Press.

    Larsen, K. and U. Gunnarsson-Östling (2009) "Climate change scenarios and citizen-participation: Mitigation and adaptation perspectives in constructing sustainable futures." Habitat International 33:260-266.

    Robinson, J. B. (1990) "Futures under glass: A recipe for people who hate to predict." Futures 22.

    Swyngedouw, E. (2007) "Impossible "Sustainability" and the Postpolitical Condition." in The Sustainable Development Paradox: Urban Political Economy in the United States, edited by Krueger, R. and D. Gibbs. New York: Guilford Press.

    Wangel, J. (2011) "Exploring social structures and agency in backcasting studies for sustainable development." Technological Forecasting & Social Change Article in press.

     

  • 21.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Politicizing planning through multiple images of the future2014In: Green Utopianism: Perspectives, Politics and Micro-Practices / [ed] Johan Hedrén and Karin Bradley, Taylor & Francis, 2014, p. 101-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Process and content sustainability in planning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In current planning, process is seen as a means to safeguard just outcomes. However, when operationalised, different plans are not equally ‘good’ for nature and different societal groups. This paper problematise the implications understanding planning as mainly process has on content sustainability and justice. This means asking questions about what are seen as important sustainability targets to be reached by planning and how are these decided upon. What is desirable? For whom? What risks (e.g. ecological crises and social issues) need to be handled? These questions highlights’ planning’s political dimensions.

     

    Current planning for sustainable development can be understood in terms of different discursive (in)justices and ways of understanding the environment. It is therefore important to understand different sustain­ability discourses and also relate them to scientific discourses on e.g. climate change and ecosystems, and also to politically decided targets like climate change adaptation and mitigation and a reduced rate of decline of biodiversity.

     

    Scientific discourses on the environment are sometimes said to signal that there is one benign and sustainable nature to conserve, which means missing asking questions about the kind of socio­environmental arrangements we wish to produce, how these can be achieved, and the sort of natures we wish to inhabit. These questions are certainly important, but highlighting nature’s boundaries need not mean that nature is seen as static. Instead, it is contingent on technology, preferences and the structure of production and consumption. However, when what is meant by sustainable development is not clearly elucidated, nobody is against it and most just keep on doing business as usual.

  • 23.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bergman, Helena
    Engwall, Kristina
    Johannesson, Livia
    What about the future?: The troubled relationship between futures and feminism2014In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper argues that issues related to the future are worth emphasizing and discussing with more feminist fervour and engagement than is now the case within feminist studies and futures studies. It is concluded that feminists cannot just be critical from an outside perspective, but must engage in creating alternative futures. These futures should not be common goals around which to unite, but a way to inspire feminist thinking about different futures. The authors point out the problem that the futures studies field lacks feminist perspectives, and in this position paper they discuss the gap between futures studies and feminism.

  • 24.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Using the concept of sustainability to work: Interpretations in academia, policy, and planning2013In: Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe's Greenest City / [ed] Jonathan Metzger, Amy Rader Olsson, Taylor & Francis, 2013, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Framtiden för Naturvårdsverket: tre workshoppar med Naturvårdsverkets personal2018Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Just Futures?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Looking closer at four long-term urban development strategies for Stockholm, we found that they all intend to depict a sustainable urban development, but the images described are very different. This creates a good starting point for discussing the contested concept sustainable development. We argue that discussing sustainable development implies examining the distribution of environmental goods and bads. Thus, planners must be clear about their view on justice.

    In this article we contribute to the discussion and development of the concept environmental justice, how it relates to sustainable development and how it can be used in long-term planning.

  • 27.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Scenario Planning for Sustainability in Stockholm, Sweden: Environmental Justice Considerations2011In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1048-1067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to see how awareness of sustainable development and environmental justice can be increased and operationalized in planning through the use of scenarios. On scrutinizing four long-term urban development strategies for Stockholm, we found that they all intend to depict a sustainable urban development, but the resultant images are very different. This article underlines the importance of combining environmental justice with an understanding of environmental threats and risks. We see that the carrying capacity of nature is limited, but we also see the need to share resources justly and make sure that environmental degradation does not systematically strike certain groups only. The conceptual elements are applied to four scenarios for a future Stockholm, zooming in to some extent on a suburban shopping node just outside the city. The point of focusing on it is that such shopping areas are sometimes seen as symbols of non-sustainable city development, but, since they are already in place, their function in the future city needs to be discussed.

  • 28.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Att använda scenarier: förslag till långsiktigt miljömålsarbete2006Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Höjer, Mattias
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Pluralising the Future Information SocietyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the argument that the sustainability challenges that emerge from the production and use of ICT are complex to evaluate due to the high pace of ICT development, the rapid dissemination of new ICT infrastructure and devices and their unpredictable effects on socio-economic structures, this study shows that there are alternatives to contemporary forecasted futures and exemplifies that ICT can be used to facilitate different societal developments. It is argued that creating parallel possible futures (plural) aids in the process of identifying potential benefits and drawbacks of technological development and situate current decisions in a longer time frame. The process of designing five images of the future of Sweden in 2060 is, then, presented and some of the advantages of using these images for different purposes are discussed. Among the concluding reflections it is highlighted that exploring benefits and drawbacks of different possible futures can empower actors that at the present play a role in shaping and implementing ICT strategies and policies and also actors from other sectors getting to see the opportunities and risks with ICT.

  • 30.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Dags för miljörättvisepolitik2013In: Tiden, no 2-3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Climate change scenarios and behavioural change: Navigating between heuristics of deliberative planning processes and astroturfing2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In constructing normative scenarios images of the future are generated illustrating potential ways of living, travelling and consuming products and services where certain goals such as a reduced climate impact are fulfilled (Börjeson et al, 2006; Myers and Kitsuse, 2000). This paper analyses the sustainability framing of behavioural changes in such normative scenarios (Larsen and Höjer, 2007) and how it relates to the participatory processes used to generate the scenarios. We discuss this building on concepts of deliberative planning processes as a means to achieve legitimate, effective and sustainable futures (Connelly and Richardson, forthcoming; Hendriks et al., 2007). The theoretical arguments are combined with examples from environmental scenario construction in practice (Carlsson-Kanyama et al., 2003, Dreborg et al., forthcoming). This illustrates fields of tension arising when either sustainability or process values are veneering goals of a scenario making process. When focus is on content values such as reduced climate impact, the process values might be depreciated. On the other hand, when focus is on process values such as legitimacy, content sustainability and possibilities for actual change might be downgraded.

  • 32.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Participatory methods for creating feminist futures2012In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 914-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender perspectives in futures studies are rare and often sidelined, but there is also a feminist quest for feminist descriptions of the future. In this paper we explore how feminist futures could be devised, by analysing three one-day workshops designed to elaborate on feminist futures. The aim of the paper is twofold: to explore the possibilities of creating feminist images of the future and to develop and test participatory workshop methods for this in various settings. In all, around 70 participants (staff at a national funding agency/feminist researchers and practitioners working with gender equality/students in a futures studies course) took part in the workshops. The participants were guided through a sequence of activities including brainstorming and visioning with the ultimate aim of creating images of feminist futures, fulfilling a pre-specified goal: a society free of structural inequalities based on sex. The participants listed factors in the present and trends that may prevent us from achieving the goal and how these factors could be described in a feminist future. We argue that futures studies methods need to be changed in order to incorporate a critical gender perspective. In the paper we examine the results of the workshop and elaborate on how feminist futures can be created.

  • 33.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish environmental quality objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 498-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 34.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish national environmental objectives (vol 43, pg 1, 2011)2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies.

  • 35.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish national environmental objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present paper is to present and evaluate a method for encouraging long-term thinking and considerations of a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental objectives that national authorities are responsible for. They are evaluated annually and also in-depth every fourth year. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing a more long-term thinking in the work with the environmental objectives, tested in the in-depth evaluation 2008. An experience was that it is difficult to design a collective scenario work in a case with a wide variety of objectives and with individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies in authorities work. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies competence and thinking at the authorities. Another experience is that despite the difficulties, experts at the authorities did start thinking more in terms of opportunities with futures studies. A general conclusion from the work was that there is an interest and need for futures studies at the authorities in charge of the environmental objectives. The possibly most important conclusion from this project was that the authorities need to build up their own competences in futures studies.

  • 36.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Climate change scenarios and citizen-participation: Mitigation and adaptation perspectives in constructing sustainable futures2009In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 260-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses adaptation and mitigation strategies as outlined in climate change scenarios. The adaptive perspective is closely connected to the concept of resilience understood as different views on nature's capacity to absorb shocks, renewal and re-organization. In constructing normative scenarios images of the future are generated illustrating potential ways of living, travelling and consuming products and services where certain goals such as a reduced climate impact are fulfilled. This paper argues that tension arising from climate strategies relying on either adaptation or mitigation strategies, or combining the two strategies, warrant further examination. In this paper the inter-relationships between adaptation and mitigation are discussed by examining processes of citizen-participation in constructing scenarios and applying the concepts of resilience, vulnerability and adaptive capacity. We discuss this using the concept of deliberative planning processes as a means to achieve legitimate, effective and sustainable futures. As a part of this approach, we argue that methods for citizen-participation applied in exploring different science and technology options also provide useful insight for this type of planning processes. The theoretical arguments are combined with examples from environmental scenario construction in practice. The paper brings attention to tensions between sustainability content values, such as reduced climate impact, and more process-oriented values such as legitimacy, learning and participatory scenario construction. Moreover, the concept of open innovation processes is introduced to the context of participatory scenario construction comparing shared ground in terms of user-involvement in search of novel solutions and also increasing robustness of action plans implemented to reduce climate change.

  • 37.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Working with citizens to help develop climate change plans2009In: EC News Alert. Science for Environment Policy, Vol. 170, no OctoberArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Sjögårde, Peter
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Sustainability as a topic at a technical university: A bibliometric analysis2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Westholm, Erik
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Department of Urban and Rural Development.
    Environmental scenarios and local-global level of communityengagement: Environmental justice, jams, institutions and innovation2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 413-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National climate change policy currently operates on a continuum from the local community to the supra-national level. These initiatives include local deliberative processes of low-carbon futures as well as local-global interactions in ‘eco-innovation jam’ dialogues carried out in a virtual space, but founded on communicating with local stakeholder groups. Experiences from national processes and international examples of these structured dialogues of community engagement raise important questions of environmental justice and deliberative processes that facilitate participation by some groups, but perhaps also neglect others. This is particularly relevant since the environmental justice discourse traditionally frames environmental concerns in a place-bound manner that includes local responses to environmental questions. In this paper we argue the importance of local and global forums and deliberative processes for community engagement in order to incorporate stakeholders’ perceptions of future options for low-carbon living, travelling and consuming services and products. Important policy transformations in planning for low-carbon societies are outlined and results from cases are discussed. We conclude with three remarks about the importance of citizen participation for understanding local conditions for change, processes of localized internationalization, and new roles for nation states facing the climate change challenge. We also recognise the importance of the local and global level of deliberative processes targeting sustainable urban futures.

  • 40.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The (Un)sustainability of Imagined Future Information Societies2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 773-785Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathway to a sustainable society is not clear, and we need to consider different developmental possibilities. This paper describes the results of a research project in the intersection of HCI and Futures Studies as well as in the intersection between "the future information society" and sustainability. We here present parts of the body of materials that were developed in a multi-year research project with the aim of describing and evaluating the sustainability impact of possible future information societies. We also discuss some of the lessons learned and what HCI and design fiction can learn from Futures Studies in general and from this project in particular. The main stakeholders in this project have been city administrators and corporate partners, and the overarching goal has primarily been to influence planning processes at the regional (Stockholm, Sweden) level.

  • 41.
    Schalk, Meike
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eco-Feminist Futures II: Critical Spatial Practices2013In: Rethinking the Social in Architecture, 2013, p. 105-108Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Schalk, Meike
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Feminist futures and 'other worlds': Ecologies of critical spatial practice2017In: Routledge Handbook of Gender and Environment / [ed] Sherilyn MacGregor, London and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 447-463Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Alfredsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Aretun, Åsa
    VTI.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI.
    Malmaéus, Mikael
    IVL.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Stigson, Peter
    IVL.
    Testversion av scenarier för hållbart samhällsbyggande bortom BNP-tillväxt2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong research environment ”Beyond GDP growth - Scenarios for sustainable building and planning” explores what could happen in the Swedish society when growth is not seen as an end in itself but the goal is instead other qualities that society might wish to achieve. The purpose of this report is to describe the test version of scenarios for Sweden in 2050. The scenarios are qualitative and aim to create a basis for further development, discussion and analysis. The scenarios are so-called normative backcasting scenarios which means that they illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of the four scenarios are: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automisation for quality of life, and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The scenarios are presented as descriptions of the future in Sweden, with a brief description of global trends and developments in Sweden that may explain the scenario assumptions. A lot of work remains. For example, the scenarios will be presented and discussed in several forums in the coming year, and the feedback from the discussions will be incorporated into a new version of the scenarios. Economic modeling of the scenarios will also be performed, and after that sustainability assessments of scenarios and in depth studies of parts of the scenarios.

  • 44.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Alfredsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Södertörn Högskola.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Aretun, Åsa
    VTI.
    Buhr, Katarina
    IVL, Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI.
    Öhlund, Erika
    Södertörn University.
    Skånberg, Kristian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Stigson, Peter
    IVL, Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Scenarios for sustainable futures beyond GDP growth 2050Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of continued economic growth is increasingly questioned and critically analysed on the basis of its potential negative sustainability impact. Along with the critique, visions and strategies for alternative systems need also be brought onto the agenda. The aim of this paper is to present the qualitative content of scenarios that explore sustainability strategies for Swedish society when economic growth is not seen as an end in itself, and the goal is instead other values/goals that society might wish to achieve. Multi-target backcasting scenarios are developed, that illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of the four scenarios is: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life, and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. In the paper, we also present the process of the development of the scenarios and feedback from stakeholders. Although the focus is on Sweden, the process and scenarios should also be relevant for other similar countries. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their relevance and their purpose, the fulfilment of the sustainability goals and the multi-target approach.

  • 45.
    Tunström, Moa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Socioekologisk stadsutveckling - begrepp och lokal praktik2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Hörnberg, Christina
    Impact Assessment in municipal energy planning: Current trends and pathways forward2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Byström, Gustaf
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Strategic municipal energy planning – examining current practice in Sweden2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Wretling, Vincent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Hörnberg, Christina
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Exploring the application of Impact Assessment and its function of addressing interactions between national environmental objectives in Swedish energy and climate planningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Besides the dire need to tackle climate change, a multitude of anthropogenic environmental impacts and associated environmental objectives also need to be addressed in planning. Impact Assessment (IA) tools such as Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) can potentially aid such consideration in planning, and thus the IA practice and its contribution to considering national environmental objectives are explored within municipal and regional energy and climate planning in Sweden. The results show that, in consequence of low application and quality of screening, the performance of IA is generally lacking within Swedish energy and climate planning. Furthermore, the policy documents for which an IA has been conducted have a significantly higher inclusion of the Swedish National Environmental Quality Objectives, thereby indicating that the use of IA can facilitate the consideration of national environmental objectives. Consequently, interactions among national objectives can be illuminated and synergies utilised, a function that otherwise often is lacking.

  • 49.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    En Stockholmsregion utan klimatpåverkan från transport- och bebyggelsesektorn 2050: framtidsbilder och strategier i närtid2018Report (Other academic)
1 - 49 of 49
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