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  • 1.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Health and safety coordinators in building projects2014In: Built Environment Project and Asset Management, ISSN 2044-124X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 251-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – In order to reduce the number of injuries on construction sites, a European Directive prescribes that the clients shall appoint safety and health coordinators in their projects. The purpose of this paper is to find out who are appointed to be health and safety coordinators for the design and planning phase and what they do in order to prevent injuries on sites. Design/methodology/approach – Since the 1st of January 2009, there shall be a coordinator for the design and planning phase in Swedish construction projects. Telephone interviews were made with the coordinators in 42 Swedish building projects.

    Findings – The coordinators’ education and experiences varied widely, as well as their descriptions of their duties: no duties, administration and active injury prevention. The coordinators who were classified as most active had at least one additional leading role in the projects. Research limitations/implications – The study is qualitative for an increased understanding, not a statistical reflection of the coordinator population.

    Practical implications – The legislation needs to clarify whether the early conceptual phase of the project is included in the coordinator’s commission and whether she/he is supposed to participate in identifying, assessing and reducing risks through design changes. These clarifications will have an influence on when the coordinator should be appointed and what competence she/he needs. Originality/value – The study increases the understanding of how the health and safety coordinators of the planning and projecting phase of building projects perceive their mission and what factors, according to them, have an influence on what they do.

  • 2.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project2010In: On the Road to Vision Zero?: Construction, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (71) Possibilities for designers to reduce the risk of work injury in the production phase of a building project. Lena Almén, Tore J Larsson, (School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden) Work related injuries and diseases are more frequent among construction workers than the labour market in average. Thus, there is a need of more preventive work during the design and planning phase. Two building projects, both productions of new apartment buildings with a design and construct contractor, were studied. Unsafe conditions were identified by workers and managers at the construction sites. The unsafe conditions were presented to the designers and planners. They were asked to describe the correlated decisions during the design and planning phase; when they were taken, why and by whom.

    Influence from outside the company was related to the clients, the town planning department, laws, a trade association and to the design of building products. The managers at the construction sites did not get any information, from the designers and planners, of what occupational risks there were in any of the projects. The routines for how to identify and handle hazards in the designing and planning phase were not sufficient. Furthermore, the designers explained, that they did not have enough competence in construction methods to be able to foresee occupational consequences at the construction sites when they designed rare constructions. The designers and planners did not follow up occupational risks at any of the construction sites. In order to get a safer working environment at construction sites, the top managers in the building companies need to define the acceptable safety level and put the safety issue on the agenda for all employees in the company, along with quality, costs and time schedule. Safety need to be communicated with those outside the company who have an influence on the working environment, and included in contracts with consultants, subcontractors and suppliers.

  • 3.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Health and Safety Coordinators´Potential to Prevent Injuries on Construction Sites2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk of occupational disease and serious injury in the building and construction industry is high. The earlier in the construction process, the greater are the possibilities to reduce hazards.

    According to the Swedish legislation, Architects and Design Engineers shall, within the framework of their assignment, ensure that aspects of health and safety are considered during the construction of a building as well as in the use of the finished building.

    Since the 1st of January 2009, Clients (natural or legal persons for whom projects are carried out) in Sweden are obliged to appoint a Health and Safety Coordinator for the design and planning of the building. The Coordinators must have the educational skills and experience needed to perform their duties.

    The aim of this study was to find out what persons are appointed to be coordinators, how they perceive their duties and, potentially, what could facilitate the Health and Safety Coordinators’ activities and construction site safety.

    Telephone interviews were carried out with 40 Health and Safety Coordinators for the design and planning phase of 42 building projects during 2010.

    The Coordinators education and experiences varied to a large degree. Their description of duties also varied greatly, from no duties, to administrative duties, to active injury prevention.

    According to the Coordinators, the following factors had a positive influence on their possibilities to act for injury prevention:

    • The Coordinator is appointed early in the process
    • The Coordinator has authority in the project
    • The Client prioritizes occupational safety
    • There is knowledge of construction methods in the design team
  • 4.
    Almén, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Influence of the Designer on the Risk of Falling from Heights and of Exposure to Excessive Workloads on two Contruction Sites2012In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 2-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workers on construction sites are exposed to an excessive risk of being injured at work. This study identifies occupational hazards on two construction sites – hazards that were related to the design of the building – and undertakes an analysis of the basis upon which related design decisions were made.Risks of falling from heights were related to the shape of the building. Risks related to an excessive workload were related to the weight of building products and possibilities to use equipment to avoid manual transports.The hazards were discussed at focus group meetings. During these meetings, the participants showed an increased understanding of safety issues in the project, each other's views and difficulties, and their own ability to facilitate acceptable risk levels for others.Some hazards were not foreseen during the design and planning phase. According to the architects, their knowledge about construction methods was not sufficient to predict hazards related to the shape of the building.Other hazards were foreseen, though considered to be primarily the contractor's responsibility. Consultants in the design and planning phase, on behalf of the client, were focused on quality, time schedule and economy, more than on occupational safety. There were building products on the market which were designed to fulfil functional regulatory requirements and requests from consumers, but not sufficient enough to ensure that they could be handled without exposure to an excessive workload. The demands and routines in the project did not ensure that project-specific hazard information was given to the contractor. 

  • 5.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Odla under tak i eller nära bostaden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within a project called “The sustainable greenhouse as a complement to buildings” financed by the Delegation of sustainable cities in Sweden, researchers, consultants and students have during 2013 developed, tested and evaluated various solutions for cultivating under roofs in or close to dwellings. We included solutions such as cultivating a plot in a rooftop greenhouse, a circular cultivation balcony or to cultivate in one’s kitchen or living room using a fish and vegetable furniture, a green wall, a green lamp or a green frame attached to the wall. The practical trials were preceded by a literature survey that described good examples of cultivation under roofs in various cities around the world.The results show that here are many inspiring examples of cultivating under roofs in cities and that such cultivation has gained some momentum. Our practical trials show among others that urban agriculture seems challenging and appealing for many but that the solutions that we have tested seem to be too expensive and partly also too time-consuming. Those who like to cultivate do so because it is fun and they can get products of good quality. To lessen the environmental impacts are also a reason but here our results that productivity in urban farming has to be higher than in our trials in order for the products to be considered as “climate-friendly”. Growing fish at home showed to be rather unpopular and many thought that slaughtering the fish by themselves would be nasty. Others results from the project are a water cooled LED lamp built in four copies and successfully installed in a fish and vegetable production unit as well as drawings and costs estimates for a cultivation bench.Proposals for further studies include analysis of flight and nutrient requirements for cultivation under roofs in cities as well as measurements of productivity. More low cost solutions for cultivating under glass should also be developed. To expand and maintain interest and knowledge for cultivation under roofs in cities is not only important for increasing social sustainability and eventually the environmental one as well but also because of the need to enhance preparedness.

  • 6.
    Freitag, Sonja
    et al.
    Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in Health, Welfare Services.
    Fincke-Junod, Isabell
    Seddouki, Rachida
    Dulon, Madeleine
    Hermanns, Ingo
    Kersten, Jan Felix
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Nienhaus, Albert
    Frequent Bending-An Underestimated Burden in Nursing Professions2012In: Annals of Occupational Hygiene, ISSN 0003-4878, E-ISSN 1475-3162, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 697-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the total duration per shift in which nurses work in a forward bending position over 20 degrees. Furthermore, the influence of several factors on the occurrence of sagittal trunk inclinations in nurses was investigated. Trunk postures were recorded for nine nursing home nurses from four German nursing homes and 18 hospital nurses from seven hospitals using the CUELA measurement system. A total of 79 shifts, 27 in nursing homes and 52 in hospitals, were analysed. All measurements were supported by video recordings. Specially developed software (WIDAAN 2.75) was used to synchronize the measurement data and video footage. The total duration of inclinations per shift was significantly affected by the working area (nursing home or hospital) with an increase of 25.3 min in nursing homes (95% confidence interval 2.4-48.2; P = 0.032). Another factor was the extent of personal basic care tasks performed by the nurses (P < 0.001). Nursing home nurses worked about twice as long per shift in a forward bending position compared with hospital nurses (112 versus 63 min; P < 0.001) and they assumed almost one-third more inclinations per shift (1541 versus 1170; P = 0.005). Nursing staff perform a large number of inclinations. The amount of time spent by nurses working in a forward bending position was highly dependent on the working area and the extent to which patients were in need of help. It is very likely that future preventive measures, focussing on reducing the huge amount of inclination, would reduce the physical stress in everyday nursing work substantially.

  • 7.
    Freitag, Sonja
    et al.
    BGW–Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services.
    Seddouki, Rachida
    UKE–University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf.
    Dulon, Madeleine
    BGW–Institution for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services.
    Kersten, Jan Felix
    UKE–University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Nienhaus, Albert
    UKE–University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf.
    The effect of working position on trunk posture and exertion for routine nursing tasks: An Experimental Study2014In: Annals of Occupational Hygiene, ISSN 0003-4878, E-ISSN 1475-3162, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 317-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:To examine the influence of the two following factors on the proportion of time that nurses spend in a forward-bending trunk posture: (i) the bed height during basic care activities at the bedside and (ii) the work method during basic care activities in the bathroom. A further aim was to examine the connection between the proportion of time spent in a forward-bending posture and the perceived exertion.Methods:Twelve nurses in a geriatric nursing home each performed a standardized care routine at the bedside and in the bathroom. The CUELA (German abbreviation for 'computer-Assisted recording and long-Term analysis of musculoskeletal loads') measuring system was used to record all trunk inclinations. Each participant conducted three tests with the bed at different heights (knee height, thigh height, and hip height) and in the bathroom, three tests were performed with different work methods (standing, kneeling, and sitting). After each test, participants rated their perceived exertion on the 15-point Borg scale (6 = no exertion at all and 20 = exhaustion).Results:If the bed was raised from knee to thigh level, the proportion of time spent in an upright position increased by 8.2% points. However, the effect was not significant (P = 0.193). Only when the bed was raised to hip height, there was a significant increase of 19.8% points (reference: thigh level; P = 0.003) and 28.0% points (reference: knee height; P < 0.001). Bathroom tests: compared with the standing work method, the kneeling and sitting work methods led to a significant increase in the proportion of time spent in an upright posture, by 19.4% points (P = 0.003) and 25.7% points (P < 0.001), respectively. The greater the proportion of time spent in an upright position, the lower the Borg rating (P < 0.001) awarded.Conclusions:The higher the proportion of time that nursing personnel work in an upright position, the less strenuous they perceive the work to be. Raising the bed to hip height and using a stool in the bathroom significantly increase the proportion of time that nursing personnel work in an upright position. Nursing staff can spend a considerably greater proportion of their time in an ergonomic posture if stools and height-Adjustable beds are provided in healthcare institutions.

  • 8.
    Glimskär, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    A walker used as a lifting device2014In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 264-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To develop assistive technology that would help an older person to arise from a kneeling position to a standing one. Methods: Developing a prototype, based on an inclusive design and then testing the prototype to verify the approach. The prototype was subsequently tested by a panel of 20 elderly users. These tests were observed and filmed. Participants' experiences of being lifted with the elevation seat were registered with the VIDAR ergonomic assessment system. Result: None of the 20 participants used a walker at that time. In response to a question of whether, assuming they might have to use a walker in the future, they thought that a walker with an elevating seat would be helpful, 18 said that it would. Two of the participants did not believe that they would ever have to use a walker. Conclusion: A simple assistive technology such as a walker equipped with an elevating seat would in many of these cases simplify matters and reduce the distress of people who fall often. In addition, such a device can allow people who fall often to live in their homes longer. For caregivers dealing frequently with people who fall, this assistive device can contribute to decreasing occupational injuries.

  • 9.
    Glimskär, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations in the Construction Industry2012In: Working on Safety, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Ergonomi i hemmiljö - Badrummet som arbetsplats: En rapport från ett forskningsprojekt2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A research project was conducted in 2010. The aim was to analyze risks in the home care work in the bathroom when they assist an ambulatory care recipient to and from the toilet. Two scenarios were tested and 30 and 24 research subjects, home care worker, were participating.

    The results show that staffs in around 70 percent of the time are working in a position with back flexion in this work. This increases the risk for over-extersion injuries. In this case study the greatest risk of occupational injury was judged to be in the moment when the home care worker helps the care recipient with his pants. In this situation the care recipient balance is effected and the risk increases that care recipient loses balance and also the risk for the personnel’s back to get injured when they try to reach for the patient from an already fragile working position.

    The report includes suggestions for further research in this area, mostly in the form of risk analysis. The results of the study indicate that health care workers should have extended knowledge in handling technique and encouraged to work out from the front of care recipient. The bathroom design should evolve to minimize the time staff are working in positions that contain both flexion and rotation of the back, and by facilitating the patient to perform the most out of their own.

  • 11.
    Hjalmarson, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Helping in transfer from wheelchair to toilet: A case study analysing ergonomic postures in the bathroom for home care workers2013In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal disorders are common among home care workers, and the task of helping care recipients between wheelchair and toilet is described as particularly burdensome.

    OBJECTIVES: This study’s objectives were to find out where exposure to risks is highest for overexertion injuries in the task of helping a care recipient move between wheelchair and toilet, and to suggest how the bathroom environment or assistive devices could be improved to decrease risk of injury.

    METHODS: In a full-scale laboratory, home care workers helped persons move between wheelchair and toilet. The CUELA measurement system was used, combined with video observation, to record postures assumed during the task.

    RESULTS: Maximum back inclination on average exceeded 40 degrees. This angle is, combined with rotation of the back and the weight of the care recipient, well over recommended limits for helping in the task. The knees were exposed to a particularly heavy load when the wheelchair was adjusted, taking off leg-rests.

    CONCLUSIONS: Solutions should be developed which increase possibilities for the care recipient to participate and bear much of the load. Development of wheelchairs and other assistive devices should include usability aspects for the assisting care workers.

  • 12.
    Hägvide, Mona-Lisa
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Institute.
    Fall scenarios in causing older women´s hip fractures2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 2013, no 20, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Falls and fall-related injuries among older women constitute a major public health problem with huge costs for the society and personal suffering. The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate how a number of circumstances, conceptualized as a scenario, that were related to the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation contributed to a fall that led to a hip fracture among women. The sample included 48 women over 55 years old. Methods. Interviews were conducted during home visits and the analysis provided a descriptive picture of circumstances in the shape of a scenario related to the risk of falling. A number of scenarios were developed based on the data and named to provide an understanding of the interplay between the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation at the time of the fall. Results. By applying the concept of a scenario, occupational therapists can increase the awareness of fall risks among older people, and are relevant also for interior designers, architects, and town planners to consider when designing the local environment as well as furniture and other objects. 

  • 13.
    Larsson, Tore
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Future ways of distributing care and personal services2015In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 55, p. 171-171Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Accident information and priorities for injury prevention1990Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Computer-aided risk assessment: Claims data as expert system support for industrial safety management2001In: Safety In Action Conference: Invited paper / [ed] Safety Institute of Australia Ltd, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Decision Support for Risk Analysis in Small Enterprises2006In: 3rd International Conference Workingonsafety, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Intervention against traditional OHS risks: redesign and process modification of the manufacturing of plastic bags2005In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Is small business a safety problem?2003In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Common beliefs in relation to safety in small business are of two types; a) small businesses are more unsafe, apply unsafe practices, and thus have a higher incidence of occupational injury and a higher average severity of injury, and b) small business have poor knowledge of, and exhibit low compliance with, laws, rules and regulations, and are increasingly difficult to control.

    A survey of 100 small business operators in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia was undertaken. Ten different industries - farming, nurseries, fishing, printing, metal manufacturing, concreting, electrical work, cleaning services, cafes and restaurants, women’s hairdressing - were included in the regional sample. The face-to-face conducted interview included questions on educational background, business experience, number and type of staff, own ill health, perceptions of hazards, experience of work-related injury or illhealth in the company, comparison of risks at work with risks outside work, claims experience, knowledge of experience rating system, attitudes to investment in risk-reduction, to safety and productivity, attitudes to the nature of safety problems at work, willingness to pay, decision-making style, relation between debts and assets in the business, recent and future investment in safety, and contacts with government bodies, insurers and OH&S professionals.

    Small business operators seemed to know quite well which type of risks they, and their family and staff, are exposed to. Educational background, the long average trade/ business experience, the risk exposure from the practical and hands-on type of work that virtually all owners/managers in this study do, their experience of work-related ill-health and traumatic injury, together with the perceived risks reported from the different industries, support this. When claims cost was checked against size of remuneration it was indicated that there could be a systematic under-reporting of minor-medium claims from small businesses, particularly from businesses smaller than AUD120,000 in remuneration, ie. the typical company-size of this study.

    The study generates no real proof that size of an industrial establishment in itself is an important factor for OH&S. Some industrial activities and processes define size - small or large - and the hazards generated in the process, and the actual risk exposure, will explain the incidence and type of occupational trauma and disease. However, some occupational groups, particularly in high-risk areas, tend to under-estimate or be prepared to bear the high inherent health risks of their trade. Concreting is an example in this study. Farmers have a tradition of high risk acceptance, which is combined with a low resource level.

    It is crucial for successful approaches to improved work environment and safety in small business to accept that most small business operators have reasonable capacity, knowledge and experience to handle the risks in their own operations. To be relevant and useful to small business, the emphasis of the OH&S information should shift from the legalistic formal administration of safety to the practical solution of typical and high-priority technical risk problems in specific industries. In view of the social characteristics of small business, and their pervasive inclusion of work in family and general life, communication about OH&S in small business should shift its focus from the traditional industrial relations and workers’ compensation arguments to a genuine 24-hour perspective of public and family health.

  • 19.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Occupational Trauma: Measurement, intervention and control1999In: Work Life 2000 Conference: Invited paper, Springer , 1999, p. 164-182Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Pulverization of Risk - Privatization of Trauma2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Safety Management - Technology and health: Invited keynote lecture2004In: Health and Safety at Public Works, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Safety Management Systems: Culture, Cognition or Cash?2010In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 14, no 2, p. Editorial-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Sjukvårdens subkultur - ett hinder för säker vård?: The subculture of medical care - an obstacle to patient safety? ( In Swedish)2007In: I rättvisans namn / [ed] Ödegård, Synnöve, Stockholm: Liber , 2007, 1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Injury Prevention in Traditional Process Monitoring Work2004In: Occupational Risk Prevention / [ed] Mondelo,P, Mattila,M, Karwowski, W, Hale, A (Eds), 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Systematic Safety Management: the challenge of development2002In: The 68th International conference on the prevention of occupational accidents: Invited keynote lecture, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Distribution of Sprains and Strains by Gender, Age, Occupation and Industry According to the Victorian Claims Data 1996-20002001Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The logistics of distributed aged care in a local Swedish community2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to map the pattern of care contacts between +65 year olds with multiple medical diagnoses living at home and their formal and informal care and service providers, 62 persons in the local council of Haninge agreed to keep a diary of all their health related contact events for a period of 6 months. The participants were visited once a fortnight and their diary inputs were recorded. The data was collected during 2011, 2012 and 2013. 20 000 contact events and 28 000 activities were recorded over 10620 participant days. Background variables like marital status, type of dwelling, type of medical problems were  related to patterns of contact with health care staff, transport services, type of care services provided, importance of family and informal care providers. The result is a fairly detailed description of the logistics requirements in a system of distributed aged care with high accessibility and retained independence.

  • 28.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Politics of Risk2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Prevention of Hazardous Child Labour2007In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The subculture of care and care-related infections: Invited paper to Occupational Risk Prevention Conference 20142014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, 10% of all hospitalised patients acquire a care-related infection; between 25 - 35000 patients annually are severely injured due to medical mistakes and between 3000 and 4000 die from erroneous procedures or acquired infections. In a study of the risk of care-related infections in an institution of special accommodation for the aged, journal data and participant observation showed a low level of infection risk, but the risk levels varied significantly between wards and the understanding of hygiene routines varied between staff. It is suggested that hygiene routines be taught as a technical professional skill for physicians, nurses and nursing aides alike.

  • 31.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    The Swedish Example2001In: : Invited paper / [ed] Victorian WorkCover Corporation, Melbourne, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    To target prevention and support the management of occupational risk: Invited Keynote Lecture2005In: Bold Perspectives, Shared Objectives, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT

    The prevention of occupationally related trauma and disease requires reliable measurement systems in order to target the relevant exposures and injury problems and prioritise resources. Social and workers' compensation insurance data, with exposure, coverage, accident process, medical severity and other outcome information, represents the most credible basis for decisions on preventative action.

    The registration and measurement system for occupational trauma and disease, based on the ACC New Zealand paradigm, has been developed by the Swedish Labour Market Insurances, and is also the basis for the new EU occupational injury registration system

    Some different target areas for occupational injury prevention, and examples of successful intervention activities, are reported from Swedish and Australian systems.

    To support the industrial management of safety requires good and industry-relevant measurement systems for occupational risk and the consequences of occupational trauma and disease. The development of such specific recording and measurement systems in Swedish branches of industry is based on union-employer consensus about occupational risk and a joint approach to safety management. Aggregate statistical information is of limited use for applied prevention; the accident and injury data must be more specific and detailed in order to be turned into credible decision support systems (DSS).

    Some different examples of industry-based safety management and decision support systems from Sweden are presented.

    Results from a study on the relation between best-of-sector industrial safety management and shareholder value on the ASX are also presented.

    1

  • 33.
    Larsson, Tore J
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Who will use claims data for the prevention of occupational trauma?2003In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If claims data from the public fund workers' compensation system is merged with the relevant census data, the relative distribution of occupational injury risk in the system can be calculated. A reconstituted occupational code, made from combining the present occupational and industrial codes, can be used to differentiate occupations in relation to hazards. A four-part injury severity index, generated in the claims settling process, can be used to further differentiate occupations, tasks and activities in terms of priorities for intervention.

    Occupational injury incidence and severity in Victoria between 1992 and 2000 were analysed. Among large and small occupational groups the combined criteria of high annual injury incidence and extreme injury severity identified the occupational groups which represent the top priorities for occupational trauma prevention counter-measures in Victoria (Larsson & Field, 2002a, 2002b). All claims for over-exertion and soft tissue injury ("sprains and strains") between 1996 and 2000 (45% of the total claims volume) were analysed with specific control for age and gender. Detailed information on accident processes and exposures commonly involved were retrieved from the claims files. The top priority groups in terms of countermeasures were identified with a combination of the variables industry, occupation, age, gender and hazardous activity associated with the trauma (Larsson et al, 2001).

    However, the development of systematic and detailed prevention information does not necessarily generate any prevention activities or interventions actioned by the combined public fund workers' compensation and industrial safety inspectorate system. In fact, it seems that systematic injury information is not commonly used for prevention by the public fund workers' compensation system and this might be due to a number of factors like:

    · actuaries determine policies in the insurance and prevention is not properly defined,

    · no proper agents for injury prevention exist in the system,

    · legislation and regulation is built for prosecution, not prevention,

    · safety and health is seen as commodities to be left to market forces, demand and private investment,

    · the only suitable workers' compensation insurance intervention is information (pamphlets, posters, advertising campaigns, etc).

    The roles of public fund workers' compensation systems, unions and collective and individual employers in practical and applied occupational injury prevention needs to be critically appraised. To move from statistics and dinner speeches to measurable reduction of clearly identified work-related injury problems, the methods and the appropriate agents for cost-efficient and systematic intervention against occupational trauma must be credibly defined.

  • 34.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Mridha, Mannan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    A consumers´testing approach to the usability of medical technology: Insulin pumps and CGM systems2014In: Advances in Safety Management and Human Factors, 2014, p. 117-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five different insulin pumps and three systems for continuous glucose monitoring were subjected to usability tests at the School of Technology and Health. Each pump was trialed and rated by 30 respondents; 20 students with no experience of diabetes and 10 diabetic pump users. Each of the CGM systems was trialed and rated by 10 non-diabetic students. All participating students were enrolled in Medical Technology (Royal Institute of Technology) or Occupational Therapy (Karolinska Institute). The technical performance of pumps and CGM systems was tested independently. The respondents handled the insulin container, the oftware, the buttons, the screen and the manual through five scenario-based tasks. The trials and the accompanying attitude items were based on the ISO definition of usability. Efficiency was measured as the proportion of respondents succeeding to perform the tasks in less than 15 minutes, combined with the average time to do so. Effectiveness was the quotient of success frequency over average performance time. Satisfaction was the average distribution on the attitude items related to software, screen, buttons and manual. All products were ranked against each other within each separate test and the rank scores accumulated. There  were significant differences in the scoring of the individual insulin pumps and CGM systems.

  • 35.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Bråfelt, Olle
    IPSO Classification&Control AB, Sweden.
    Risk control in the shipping industry: Relevant applications for the prevention of accidents2000In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    The shipping industry is in a way the first global industry. It is the link between nations and continents. The establishment of international co-operation and conventions has therefore a long history in the shipping industry.

    The public, as well as others who use shipping services have the right to expect that the ship they board or which carries their cargo is safe and within the context of the voyage, seaworthy and otherwise fit for the purpose. Seafarers too have the right to expect that their ship is safe and they will not be exposed to danger or unacceptably high levels of risk.

    There are many stakeholders in marine transportation safety. The industry is highly regulated with prescriptive requirements to ensure well-designed and constructed ships. Many operational procedures and training or certification requirements have been researched and mandated to ensure safe operations.

    It has always been recognised that the best way of improving safety at sea is by developing international regulations that are followed by all shipping nations and from the mid 19th century onwards a number of such treaties were adopted.

    In 1948 United Nations established the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). The first task was to adopt a new version of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), the most important of all treaties dealing with maritime safety. This was achieved in 1960 and IMO then turned its attention to such matters as facilitation of maritime traffic, load lines, and the carriage of dangerous goods.

    But although safety was and remains IMO's most important responsibility, a new problem was emerging - pollution. Pollution prevention was part of IMO's original mandate but in the late 1960´s a number of tanker accidents resulted in further action being taken. As an example, recent changes to the convention will make it necessary for all new tankers to be fitted with double-hulls or a design that provides equivalent cargo protection in the event of a collision or grounding. These changes are also applied to existing tankers when they reach 25 years of age.

    For certain maritime segments, the International Safety Management (ISM) Code has just come into force. For others it will enter into force soon and further insure quality of operations. State agencies i. e.

    Maritime Directorates, mariners, pilots, those involved with maritime control or advisement systems, as ISSUE 1 2000 VOL 42 well as operating companies, classification societies, and many others have interests in developing a practical system that contributes to better working environment and safer operations.

    The shipping industry has shown that free market forces can provide efficient cheap transport and it does this through a complex web of contracts and agreements. However, as ships increase in size, cargoes become more complex and ferries run even faster, the risk of disruption following an incident become correspondingly greater.

  • 36.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Bråfelt, Olle
    IPSO Classification&Control, Sweden.
    Astervik, Magnus
    IPSO Classification&Control, Sweden.
    Knutsson, Eric
    IPSO Classification&Control, Sweden.
    Prevention of injury associated with rotating action machines2001In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Repeated analyses of the Swedish national workers’ compensation claims data material in the Occupational No-Fault Liability Insurance Scheme have pointed to the high incidence of severe hand injury associated with getting caught in rotating (drilling, milling, boring, turning, grinding) machines in the metal manufacturing and engineering industry (Jedeskog & Larsson, 1988; Larsson, 1990; Persson, 1992).

    In an analysis of all permanently disabling injuries sustained in the Swedish engineering industry during 1986, six out of ten injuries associated with machines for drilling, boring and threading were caused by the operator getting caught in the rotating tool or work-piece with his/her glove or other garment (Larsson, 1990).

    In a repeated analysis of the national claims data material from the Swedish engineering industry for the years 1987, 1988 and 1989, half of all injuries sustained at the same types of rotating machines were due to glove getting caught in the rotating action (Persson, 1992).

    A development project aimed at reducing the risk of traumatic hand injury associated with rotating action machines was initiated in 1994 by the Institute for Human Safety and Accident Research (IPSO), in co-operation with the Swedish Institute of Production Engineering Research. The main focus of the work has been to develop an improved solution to emergency braking and to drastically reduce inertia rotation in the relevant machine types.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    et al.,
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro i Sverige 2003: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in Sweden 20032003Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    et al,
    Forklift Literature Review2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Forklift related accidents contribute a significant proportion of workplace fatalities all over the world.  No more severe is this problem than in the USA, the location where the majority of forklifts are manufactured.  “OHSA estimates forklifts cause about 85 fatal accidents per year, 34,000 accidents result in serious injury and 61,800 are classified as non-serious”. (Hall, 1996)

    Furthermore forklift accidents occur indiscriminately across all industry sectors, however a significant fatality ‘blackspot’ exists for plant and machine operators within the Manufacturing industry (NOHSC, 1998).   A high density of pedestrian workers exists within this environment, which in addition to vehicle roll-overs comprise the main accident mechanisms.  Conditions like narrowed aisleways and carrying loads were found to increase the likelihood of such accidents nearly two fold. (Collins et al (a), 1999)

    Certain risk factors were found to be inherent, due to the design and functional requirements of the forklift.  The narrow track coupled to a variable centre of gravity makes stability a primary concern whilst operating.  Cornering and the responsive steering characteristics of forklifts are two unbridled determinants of the vehicle’s stability.  Toyota was found to be the only forklift manufacturer to address the issue of forklift stability, and does so with the advent of SAS technology introduced on their new 7 Series forklift. (Thomas, 1999)

    Stability becomes even more of an issue when handling loads, especially when adjusting the mast whilst the forks are elevated.  Both Toyota and Komatsu forklifts now have an automatic mast-levelling feature, which is an initial step towards reducing the impact of this hazard (Robertson, 1999).   Further development of this feature is required so that the effects of steering actions, uneven terrain and positioning the load is represented therefore making this an even more desirable feature.

    Whilst the challenge of maintaining stability for forklifts is renowned, a great concern exists due to the absence of an effective means to warn or restrict operators from handling unsafe loads or performing unsafe actions.  Adaptation of attitude indicators as used in aviation to inform pilots of the aircraft’s dynamics, may be an example of a more effective means of relaying stability safety information rather than a basic load chart (Allstar Networks, 2000).  This could be the first stage of technological advancement, which prevents actions from occurring that may contravene the vehicle’s safety dynamics.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Tore J.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Field, Brian
    Victorian Workcover Authority, Melbourne, Australia.
    The distribution of occupational injury risks in the State of Victoria2002In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 419-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a merger of workers' compensation data from the public fund Victorian Work-cover Authority for the period 1992-1998 and denominator data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 1996 Census, the relative distribution of occupational injury risk in the state of Victoria has been calculated. A reconstituted occupational code, made from combining the present Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) occupational and industrial codes, was used to differentiate occupations in relation to hazards. A four-part injury severity index, generated by the claims settling process, has been used to differentiate occupations, tasks and activities in terms of priorities for intervention and prevention. Occupational injury incidence and severity in Victoria between 1992 and 1998 has been analysed. Among large and small occupational groups the combined criteria of high annual injury incidence and extreme injury severity have identified the following occupational groups as the top priorities for prevention counter-measures in Victoria: Glass, clay, stone workers; Miners, drillers; Forestry and logging workers; Roof layers; Car and delivery drivers; Wood industry workers; Other construction workers. Ergonomic interventions, together with the prevention of falls and power tool incidents related to the relevant occupational exposures, were discussed.

  • 40.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Field, Brian
    Victorian Workcover Authority, Melbourne, Australia.
    The distribution of occupational injury risks in the Victorian construction industry: Part 22002In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 439-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a merger of workers' compensation data from the public fund Victorian Workcover Authority for the period 1996–1998 and denominator data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 1996 Census, the relative distribution of occupational injury risk in the Victorian construction industry has been calculated. A four-part injury severity index, generated by the claims settling process, has been used to differentiate occupations, tasks and activities in terms of priorities for intervention and prevention. Falls from height represents the major severe injury problem in the Victorian construction industry. However, the fall risk problem is associated with different equipment and different tasks among the different occupational groups in the construction process and requires a variety of architectural, engineering and design solutions.

  • 41.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Field, Brian
    Victorian WorkCover Authority.
    Kenningham, Lance
    Victorian WorkCover Authority.
    Lee, Sharon
    Victorian WorkCover Authority.
    Falls from Heights: A report on Claims, Fatalities and Injury Severity Outcomes2000Report (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    fl, m
    Industrial forklift trucks: Dynamic stability and the design of safe logistics2003In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forklift trucks represent a well-known occupational hazard in many modern industrial environments. In terms of severe work-related injuries and fatalities, exposure to forklift trucks in the transport industry, in wholesale and retail and in manufacturing implies high risks to operators, pedestrian workers and others in the environment. Creating industrial environments where vehicle, pedestrian and material movements can flow productively without hazardous conflicts requires logistics and safety analyses as a basis for the design and layout of facilities.

    Monash University Accident Research Centre, funded by Worksafe Victoria (the local workers’ compensation insurer and industrial safety regulator), has coordinated a development project with the following components:

    · the development and testing of a paradigm for dynamic stability assessment of industrial forklift trucks;

    · the formation of a local team of experts in forklift safety, transport, logistics, and industrial architecture/design to develop, through a series of workshops, the details of safe forklift transport systems operationalized into "blueprint" format for a freight terminal and a warehouse, including relevant goods receiving and dispatch  areas;

    · a warehouse management software application, incorporating features for conflict prognosis and necessary parameters for the managing of a distribution centre;

    The project has also analysed existing alert, proximity warning and navigational systems, including systems based on ultraviolet, microwave and laser technology, together with several applications of speed limiting technology, and developed and tested a prototype RF-tag and on-vehicle receiver unit to assess costs and feasibility of using radio frequency technology to identify pedestrians in forklift truck zones.

    Testing of different combinations of electronic control devices for on-vehicle or other traffic management applications for industrial forklift trucks is undertaken at a number of industrial "testbed" locations.

    The blueprint designs will be used in a planned subsidy program targeting existing and prospective medium-size transport terminal operators in Victoria, where Worksafe Victoria covers the cost of expert assistance in translating the blueprint to the specific requirements of an operator willing to use the design as the basis for their new or upgraded facility.

    The development project aims to report its findings in the form of a ”Safe Forklift Management Manual”, the main focus of which is the safe management of the forklift transport system, with basic parameters such as rational logistics, good information ergonomics, optimal traffic separation and management, speed and proximity control, well-structured operational environments, good systems management and preferred secondary vehicle safety features.

  • 43.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Forsblom, M
    AFA Insurance, Sweden.
    Towards an international limit value for occupational trauma risk: industrial exposures associated with occupational trauma, permanent impairment and fatalities in a five-year national claims material2005In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to provide some advice on the priorities for occupational safety and health and the restriction of child labour in developing industrial systems, AFA—the Swedish labour market insurances—claims information system on work-related injuries associated with permanent impairment and fatalities was analysed for all occupations over the five-year period 1997– 2001.

    After screening and merging with employment data, the occupational groups which exhibited a stable rate of trauma injuries associated with permanent impairment and fatality three times higher than the national average were selected and information about the typical accident mechanism and equipment/process resulting in trauma in these occupational groups was retrieved.

  • 44.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Forsblom, M
    AFA Labour Market Insurances.
    Klaesson, E
    Normark, M
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro i Sverige 20052005Report (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Forsblom, M
    Normark, M
    Oldertz, C
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro 2007: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in 2007 (In Swedish)2007Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Hale, Andrew R
    Aspects of risk assessment, control and prevention2000In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contributions to this Worklife 2000 workshop and special issue of the Safety Science Monitor touch upon several aspects crucial to safety management. The perspectives and concepts presented are from areas which include, but are not specifically dedicated to, occupational health and safety. Safety at work, however, represents the prime target area of the workshop and the discussion initiated here, and hopefully continuing through the year on this site, should be seen as an attempt to seek the potential of initiatives, approaches and applications in non-occupational areas to the management of safety at work.

    These comments are not meant to be exhaustive to the theme of the workshop, but rather to provide some perspectives from the target area of work-related risks.

  • 47. Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    Hale, A.R.
    Hopkins, A.
    Kirwan, B.
    New technologies and work: Pulverization of risk - privatization of trauma?2002In: Changing regulation: Controlling hazards in society, Oxford: Emerald Group Publishing Limited , 2002, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synopsis

    Safety regulation is society's way of keeping the genie of technology in the bottle, whilst still exploiting its power for creating wealth and change. It is a difficult compromise to make. Regulators often have a thankless task. If all seems to go well they are painted as too repressive and anti-technological; if disaster strikes, the searchlight of media attention increasingly focuses on them, looking for lax enforcement, blind eyes being turned and cosy relations with the regulated. This title explores the dilemmas of the regulator through case studies presented by the regulators themselves and through research-based analyses from different disciplines of the workings of the regulators and the regulatory system. More importantly it surveys the tools available to resolve the dilemmas and asks what we know about their successes and shortcomings and what can be learned over the boundaries of industries and technologies about the principles of successful safety regulation. Chapters are written by authors from seven countries, with an international perspective. They examine the role of certification, safety cases, strictly enforced detailed rules, professional regulation and self-regulation. The text covers new risks such as those from medical devices and biotechnology, as well as the well-known fields of nuclear power, chemical plants, mining, oil and gas production, railways and the traditionally difficult area of small companies.

  • 48.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Horberry, T
    Accident research centre, Monash University, Australia.
    Brennan, T
    Accident research centre, Monash University, Australia.
    Lambert, J
    Accident research centre, Monash University, Australia.
    Johnston, I
    Accident research centre, Monash University, Australia.
    A Guidebook of Industrial Traffic Management & Forklift Safety2003Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Horberry, Tim
    Accident Research Centre, Monash University, Australia.
    Johnston, Ian
    Accident Research Centre, Monash University, Australia.
    Lambert, John
    John Lambert & Associates, Australia.
    Forklift safety, traffic engineering and intelligent transport systems: a case study2004In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 7p. 575-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper details a forklift safety demonstration project undertaken at two manufacturing sites in Victoria, Australia. The purpose of the work was both to help improve safety at the two sites, and, more broadly, to develop, help implement and evaluate a series of human-centred design interventions involving vehicles and pedestrian workers. The 'before' and 'after' case study presented here summarises the background to the research and introduces the test sites. Thereafter, it describes the overall nature of the safety interventions proposed and introduces the methods developed to assess safety. For the traffic engineering interventions, positive safety results were found in terms of reductions in the number of potentially hazardous interactions involving forklifts. Similarly, for the vehicle interventions, the research found that forklift drivers and managers considered the newly developed and installed Intelligent Transport Systems to be broadly acceptable in operational conditions, and the systems' intended safety benefits were well understood. The results are discussed and conclusions are drawn regarding human factors aspects of forklift safety.

  • 50.
    Larsson, Tore J
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Jansson, M
    Normark, M
    Oldertz, C
    Allvarliga arbetsskador och långvarig sjukfrånvaro 2008: Severe work-related injury and long-term absence from work in 2008 ( In Swedish)2008Report (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 71
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