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  • 1.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Tidigare Institutioner, Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH, Tidigare Institutioner, Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Tidigare Institutioner, Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    eMoto: emotionally engaging interaction2004Ingår i: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, nr 5, s. 377-381Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Holopainen, Jussi
    Nokia Research.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Ivarsson, Katarina
    Boris Design Studio.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio.
    Lindley, Siân
    Microsoft Research.
    Norlin, Cristian
    Ericsson Research.
    Plei-Plei!2012 (uppl. 1)Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Let us introduce an amazing crowd of researchers at Mobile Life Centre in Stockholm, Sweden, and some of their friends at Nokia Research Center, Microsoft Research Cambridge and Ericsson Research. These people are at the international forefront of research in the domain of mobile interactive technology – a situation that this book aims to celebrate!

    This is also a printed book, which means it may work a bit like a time capsule, showcasing a set of explorations that may appear peculiar and out-dated, depending on when you happen to read it. It may therefore be highlighted that all the work presented in here was conducted during the first five years of the Mobile Life Centre (2007-2012) — a time when the mobile mass market, as well as research in this field, was still new, fresh and explorative in nature.

    The title, Plei-Plei, refers to a playful approach towards research as characteristic in the work presented in this book. The term is also used by natives in the pacific islands of Vanuatu, to describe “mere play” in their everyday lives, as well as in their use of mobile phones. This means that the book is not just about fun and games, but rather an attempt to capture how research can be driven by a genuine curiosity of, and inspiration from, what people enjoy doing.

    Since many of our friends have told us that research papers are usually too long and also somewhat boring to read, we have chosen to present this work by highlighting some of our favourite results with illustrations and shorter texts that hopefully will be more inspirational and enjoyable to read. Thanks to massive help from Boris Design Studio, we are immensely impressed with the result that is now in your hand.

    Please Enjoy!

  • 3.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Appreciating plei-plei around mobiles: playfulness in Rah island2012Ingår i: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems(CHI '12) / [ed] ACM, New York, NY, USA, ACM Press, 2012, s. 2015-2024Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to explore and understand the ways in which mobiles made their way into an environment--Rah Island in Vanuatu--for the first time. We were struck by their playful use, especially given the very limited infrastructure and inexpensive devices that were available. Based on our findings, we discuss tensions between playfulness and utility, in particular relating to socio-economic benefits, and conclude that playfulness in these settings needs to be taken as seriously as in any other setting. Additionally, we formulated three challenges when designing for play in similar settings: (1) engage intimately with the materials of inexpensive ICT; (2) revisit design recommendations for playfulness to ensure that they can travel/translate into other cultures; and (3) alleviate existing tensions.

  • 4.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons Learnt in Vanuatu2011Ingår i: Proocedings of CHI'11, 2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobiles phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us – they have become habits, deeply engrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mo-bile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetics practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

  • 5. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    Höök, Kristina
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008Ingår i: NordiCHI '08: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges, 2008, s. 123-132Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 6. Gaver, W.
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    What makes a good CHI design paper?2017Ingår i: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 20-21Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 7.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    A cry for more tech at CHI!2012Ingår i: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 10-11Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This is a rant. And a plea. And an ad. With this rant, plea, and ad, I hope to attract more attention to the video and interactivity submissions at CHI 2012. But that is just a means to an end. The result I hope for is to make our field influential in shaping a whole new wave of interactions through technologies, the likes of which we have never seen before.

  • 8.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Affect and experiential approaches2013Ingår i: The SAGE Handbook of Digital Technology Research, Sage Publications, 2013, s. 174-188Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 9.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Affective Computing2012Ingår i: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis, Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation , 2012, 2Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design moved from designing and evaluating work-oriented applications towards dealing with leisure-oriented applications, such as games, social computing, art, and tools for creativity, we have had to consider e.g. what constitutes an experience, how to deal with users’emotions, and understanding aesthetic practices and experiences. Here I will provide a short account of why in particular emotion became one such important strand of work in our field.

  • 10.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Commentary on: Shusterman, Richard (2013): Somaesthetics2012Ingår i: In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/somaesthetics.htmlArtikel, forskningsöversikt (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    In designing for bodily experiences, there has been a lack of theories that can provide the underpinnings we need to understand and deepen our design thinking. Despite all the work we have seen on designing for embodiment (Dourish, 2004, and others), the actual corporeal, pulsating, live, felt body has been notably absent from both theory and practical work. At the same time, digital products have become an integral part of the fabric of everyday life, the pleasures (and pains) they give, their contribution to our social identity, or their general aesthetics are now core features of their design. We see more and more attempts to design explicitly for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task.  With the advent of new technologies, such as biosensors worn on your body, interactive clothes, or wearable computers such as mobiles equipped with accelerometers, a whole space of possibilities for gesture-based, physical and body-based interaction is opened.

    Some claim that the technologies we wear today treat our bodies in a negative way:

    “Electronics, robotics, and spintronics invade and transform the body and, as a consequence of this, the body becomes an object and loses its remaining personal characteristics, those characteristics that might make us consider it as the sacred guardian of our identity.”-- Longo, 2003 

    How can we do a better job in interaction design involving our bodies — the sacred guardians of our identity? This is where I think Shusterman’s theories of somaesthetics are relevant.

  • 11.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Digitaliseringen av det Vardagliga2015Ingår i: Om Sverige i framtiden – en antologi om digitaliseringens möjligheter (SOU 2015:65), Statens offentliga utredningar (SOU) , 2015, s. 165-194Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Alltfler saker och  interaktioner är uppkopplade på Internet i det vi kallar sakernas internet. Det sägs att 50 miljarder enheter kommer vara uppkopplande på Internet år 2020[1]. Redan i dag har vi kopplat upp många miljarder enheter. Alla våra mobiler är uppkopplade. Snart kommer våra bilar att vara uppkopplade. Elmätarna i våra hus är uppkopplade. Alla våra spelkonsoler är uppkopplade. Alla enheter i en fabrik, inklusive verktyg, kommer att vara uppkopplade så att vi alltid vet var och i vilket tillstånd saker befinner sig. Posten följer alla paket genom transportsystemet. Sensorer läser av vattenkvaliteten på våra badplatser. Alla parkeringsplatser i en stad är uppkopplade. Bullernivån på de stora gatorna i Stockholm mäts. Vi vet till och med hur mycket choklad, läsk och chips som finns i automaten på pendeltågs­stationen och kan fylla på när det behövs.

    Vad betyder det här för vår samhällsutveckling och vilka politiska beslut kommer vi behöva fatta? Att svara på den frågan är lite som att i slutet på 1800-talet försöka svara på frågan om vad elektriciteten kommer betyda för våra liv. Samtidigt vet vi ju att teknikutvecklingen inte är deterministisk. Den formas av oss och vi formas av den. Vi måste försöka överblicka vad den tekniska utvecklingen möjliggör och hur vi på bästa sätt implementerar den som en del i vårt samhälle för att kunna forma den till att bygga det samhälle vi vill ha.

    Jag har valt att spegla utvecklingen från ett vardagligt perspektiv snarare än hur den förändrar industrier eller våra yrkesliv (vilket behandlas av andra författare i den här antologin). Vi ser redan idag hur den digitala tekniken blir en naturlig del i vår vardag. Den kommer in i våra hem och bilar, ut i våra trädgårdar, på sommarstugor, ut i skogen och på våra vägar. Den hamnar också kring, på eller till och med inuti våra kroppar. Det allra mest intima får en digital skugga. Den digitala tekniken är inte längre okroppslig – åtkomlig endast genom att gå in i den digitala världen online – utan istället både kroppslig, aktiv och intim.

    Digitaliseringen av det vardagliga kan komma att professionalisera, effektivisera, kontrollera och medialisera vår vardag. Organisationen av stat, kommuner och landsting kommer att utmanas och förändras. En uppsjö företag kommer erbjuda tjänster och interaktiva artefakter som styr, och när det går, automatiserar våra hem och städer. Tekniken kommer spegla oss och skapa berättelser om våra kroppar, våra trädgårdar, våra hem, våra apparater, våra fritidstillämpningar – en sorts medialisering av verkligheten. Det kommer också finnas verktyg och teknik som låter oss vara kreativa och skapa våra egna lösningar, våra egna identiteter, i det som kallas maker-rörelsen.

    Digitaliseringen av det vardagliga möjliggör en fantastisk utveckling, med miljövänliga och effektiva lösningar, men den kräver att vi funderar över vilka värderingar som ska styra och vilken samhällsutveckling vi vill ha. Tekniken möjliggör flera olika politiska agendor. Vi kan välja att låta professionella få exklusiv makt över utformningen av de digitala lösningarna eller göra det till en bred folkrörelse i skola och samhälle. Vi kan välja att ta de digitala materialen i bruk för genomgripande förändringar mot ett mer hållbart samhälle, en delandets ekonomi där vi inte äger fysiska prylar, som bilar, cyklar eller gräsklippare, utan istället delar dem via digitala tjänster. Vi kan låta många kulturella former få sina digitala uttryck, skapa en mångfald av upplevelser och interaktioner i vår vardag. Eller vi kan välja att övervaka befolkningen, förtrycka och förfölja.

  • 12.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. Mobile Life Centre, Denmark.
    Bardzell, J.
    Bowen, S.
    Dalsgaard, P.
    Reeves, S.
    Waern, A.
    Framing IxD knowledge2015Ingår i: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 32-36Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design (IxD) research cuts through many domains of HCI yet remains distinctive. There are convincing arguments that Research through Design (RtD) is a valid research method in the concerned field. Important to these arguments is how RtD allows IxD researchers to actually do design as an empirical method to gain knowledge, rather than aligning with the user study tradition. First-order knowledge is crucial to design practice, but it should not overshadow the need for the IxD research community to articulate the many forms of design knowledge that can be extracted from design processes.

  • 13.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Caramiaux, Baptiste
    UMR STMS Ircam CNRS UPMC, 1 Pl Igor Stravinsky, F-75004 Paris, France.;McGill Univ, Schulich Sch Mus, Montreal, PQ H3A 1E3, Canada.;Univ Paris Saclay, Inria, Univ Paris Sud, CNRS LRI, Bat 650 Noetzlin St, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette, France..
    Erkut, Cumhur
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Architecture Design & Media Technol, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark..
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    Carnegie Mellon Univ, Human Comp Interact Inst, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA..
    Hajinejad, Nassrin
    City Univ Appl Sci, Hsch Bremen, Inst Informat & Automat, D-28199 Bremen, Germany..
    Haller, Michael
    Upper Austria Univ Appl Sci, Sch Informat Commun & Media, A-4232 Hagenberg, Austria..
    Hummels, Caroline C. M.
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Isbister, Katherine
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Dept Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Khut, George
    Univ New South Wales, UNSW Art & Design, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia..
    Loke, Lian
    Univ Sydney, Sydney Sch Architecture Design & Planning, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Yahoo Inc, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA..
    Marti, Patrizia
    Univ Technol, Dept Ind Design, NL-5612 AZ Eindhoven, Netherlands.;Dept Social Polit & Cognit Sci, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Melcer, Edward
    NYU, Tandon Sch Engn, Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA..
    Muller, Florian Floyd
    RMIT Univ, Exert Games Lab, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia..
    Petersen, Marianne Graves
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Comp Sci, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schiphorst, Thecla
    Simon Fraser Univ, Sch Interact Arts & Technol, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada..
    Segura, Elena Marquez
    Univ Calif Santa Cruz, Dept Computat Media, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA..
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, S-16440 Kista, Sweden..
    Svanaes, Dag
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol NTNU, Dept Comp Sci IDI, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway.;IT Univ Copenhagen, Digital Design Dept, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Comp & Syst Sci DSV, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tobiasson, Helena
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design2018Ingår i: INFORMATICS-BASEL, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, nr 1, artikel-id 8Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

  • 14.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Dalsgaard, P.
    Reeves, S.
    Bardzell, J.
    Löwgren, J.
    Stolterman, E.
    Rogers, Y.
    Knowledge production in interaction design2015Ingår i: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2015, Vol. 18, s. 2429-2432Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in HCI involves a wide variety of knowledge production - bringing forth theories, guidelines, methods, practices, design case studies / exemplars, frameworks, concepts, qualities and so on. This workshop is about mapping out the spaces, forms and potentials of such knowledge production in interaction design research.

  • 15.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Jonsson, M.
    KTH.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH.
    Tholander, Jakob
    KTH.
    Robertson, T.
    Marti, P.
    Svanæs, D.
    Peterson, M. G.
    Forlizzi, J.
    Schiphorst, T.
    Isbister, K.
    Hummels, C.
    Klooster, S.
    Loke, L.
    Khut, G.
    Move to be moved2016Ingår i: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016, s. 3301-3308Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception - even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own 'somatics', exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

  • 16.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Jonsson, Martin P.
    KTH.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Mercurio, Johanna
    Somaesthetic Appreciation Design2015Ingår i: 34TH ANNUAL CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, CHI 2016, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, s. 3131-3142Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a strong concept we name Somaesthetic Appreciation based on three different enquiries. First, our own autobiographical design enquiry, using Feldenkrais as a resource in our design process, bringing out the Soma Carpet and Breathing Light applications. Second, through bringing in others to experience our systems, engaging with and qualitatively analysing their experiences of our applications. In our third enquiry, we try to pin down what characterises and sets Somaesthetic Appreciation designs apart through comparing with and analysing others' design inquiries as well as grounding them in the somaesthetic theories. We propose that the Somaesthetic Appreciation designs share a subtleness in how they encourage and spur bodily inquiry in their choice of interaction modalities, they require an intimate correspondence - feedback and interactions that follow the rhythm of the body, they entail a distinct manner of making space shutting out the outside world - metaphorically and literally - to allow users to turn their attention inwards, and they rely on articulation of bodily experiences to encourage learning and increased somatic awareness.

  • 17.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Strong Concepts: Intermediate-Level Knowledge in Interaction Design Research2012Ingår i: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 19, nr 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-oriented research practices create opportunities for constructing knowledge that is more abstracted than particular instances, without aspiring to be at the scope of generalized theories. We propose an intermediate design knowledge form that we name strong concepts that has the following properties: is generative and carries a core design idea, cutting across particular use situations and even application domains; concerned with interactive behavior, not static appearance; is a design element and a part of an artifact and, at the same time, speaks of a use practice and behavior over time; and finally, resides on an abstraction level above particular instances. We present two strong concepts-social navigation and seamfulness-and discuss how they fulfil criteria we might have on knowledge, such as being contestable, defensible, and substantive. Our aim is to foster an academic culture of discursive knowledge construction of intermediate-level knowledge and of how it can be produced and assessed in design-oriented HCI research.

  • 18.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Ståhl, A.
    Jonsson, Martin
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Mercurio, J.
    Karlsson, A.
    Johnson, E. -CB.
    Somaesthetic design2015Ingår i: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 26-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Somaesthetics is an interdisciplinary field, originally proposed by the philosopher Richard Shusterman and grounded in pragmatist philosophy and phenomenology. An interesting result of engaging in Feldenkrais exercises was the effect on the whole beings. After a lesson, all students felt they had become more honest, more grounded in themselves, more reflective, and a bit slower in their movements and reactions. When bringing out three designs, researchers repeatedly had to try different digital and physical materials, faking interactions and testing them in situ to find the ones that would make sense. The interactions had to be simulated and acted out in order for them to really feel their impact on their bodily experiences. Simply imagining what they would be like was not enough to qualify the experience.

  • 19.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Sundström, Petra
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Interactional Empowerment2008Ingår i: CHI 2008 Proceedings - Dignity in Design, ACM Press, 2008, s. 647-656Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that an interactional perspective on how emotion is constructed, shared and experienced, may be a good basis for designing affective interactional systems that do not infringe on privacy or autonomy, but instead empowers users. An interactional design perspective may make use of design elements such as open-ended, ambiguous, yet familiar, interaction surfaces that users can use as a basis to make sense of their own emotions and their communication with one-another. We describe the interactional view on design for emotional communication, and provide a set of orienting design concepts and methods for design and evaluation that help translate the interactional view into viable applications. From an embodied interaction theory perspective, we argue for a non-dualistic, non-reductionist view on affective interaction design.

  • 20. Jonsson, M.
    et al.
    Ståhl, A.
    Mercurio, J.
    Karlsson, A.
    Ramani, N.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    The aesthetics of heat: Guiding awareness with thermal stimuli2016Ingår i: TEI 2016 - Proceedings of the 10th Anniversary Conference on Tangible Embedded and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, s. 109-117Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer.

  • 21. Kaye, J. J.
    et al.
    Laaksolahti, J.
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Isbister, K.
    The design and evaluation process2011Ingår i: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, nr 9783642151835, s. 641-656Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the design and evaluation process in the light of affective interaction. With a starting point in user-centred design we will explore what additional problems or opportunities become important when designing for affective interaction with computer systems. This chapter also provides a historical background to HCI ending with what is sometimes named the third wave of HCI – that is, designing for aesthetic, emotional experiences with and through technology. 

  • 22. Konstan, Joseph A.
    et al.
    Chi, EdGoogle.Höök, KristinaKTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems2012Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    After nearly two years of preparation, we are thrilled to welcome you to CHI 2012 in Austin, Texas. Austin is justifiably proud of being the Live Music Capital of the World (R), and it is home to a world-class university, innovative technology and design firms, superb restaurants, exciting culture and nightlife, and genuinely friendly people--what a perfect fit for our CHI conference. We encourage you to get out and explore the city.

    But we also are working hard to lure you back indoors with a phenomenal technical program. At the core of the program are over a hundred technical sessions with research papers and notes, case studies, and other exciting presentations that bring you the best new work on human-computer interaction.

    We give thanks to our hundreds of review committee members and our more than one thousand reviewers--they invested thousands of hours to help make sure that we've picked the best content. All of the technical content can be found in the ACM Digital Library.

    At the same time, we hope to lure you into our useful courses, engaging panels, and thoughtful invited talks. We're very excited to have Margaret Gould Stewart and Hugh Herr as our keynote speakers. In spanning from Margaret's talk on connecting the world through video to Hugh's talk on designing intelligent orthotics and prosthetics we span the scope of this conference--from social interaction with each other through computing to the very personal and intimate interaction of a human with computerized limbs or other assistive devices. We're also excited to have two special invited talks: Stu Card, SIGCHI's 2000 Lifetime Achievement Award winner, will talk about what interaction science means in today's environment; and Richard Shusterman will bridge HCI and the humanities as he introduces us to Somaesthetics and how it can improve our understanding and experience. We are also honored to have Dan Olsen, Joy Mountford, and Batya Friedman--SIGCHI's Lifetime Research, Lifetime Practice, and Social Impact awardees--each giving talks at CHI 2012. Each of the three of them has made an indelible impact on our field.

    The theme of this year's CHI conference is "It's the Experience!" and from the beginning it has been our goal to ensure that CHI 2012 attendees don't only hear about HCI, but experience it with all of their senses. We are therefore delighted to have more than 60 interactivity demonstrations and installations--opportunities for you to see, feel, hear, and interact with exciting new technologies and also to reflect on technologies of the past, thanks to Roger Ibars' HWD collection--a hands-on installation of historic hard-wired input devices. We'll be featuring the full set of interactivity on Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday lunchtime; selected installations will be available at other times--check the Interactivity tab for more details. Our video program will provide another way to experience innovative forms of HCI.

    CHI 2012 has new depth in Computer Games (including a new student games competition), digital arts, and the humanities. We have an unusually rich collection of Digital Arts installations--we invite you to take some time to interact with the artists and learn about how art--like science, engineering, and design--has its own ways of posing and exploring challenging questions.

    And there's so much more. We will also have over 250 posters representing exciting works-in-progress and much more. Student venues at CHI 2012 include our doctoral consortium--an intimate opportunity for extensive mentoring and peer support; student research and design competitions, and the games competition. Come see the competition finalists! And let's not forget CHI Madness--a frenetic but highly efficient whirlwind tour through each days technical papers.

    Even before we "formally" open the conference Monday morning, we will have had an intensive weekend of workshops where CHI attendees gather to address emerging fields, tackle challenging questions, and simply support each other in areas of common interest. The mutual support continues both in formal SIG gatherings and in informal gatherings in the convention center halls and at tables in our exhibit hall. We particularly invite you to gather together in affinity groups built around our nine communities--these communities not only shape our program, they also can help enrich your experience as an attendee.

  • 23.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Exergy, Anergy, and Intergy: Uncovering Energy in InteractionManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 24. Mentis, H.
    et al.
    Isbister, K.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Khut, G. P.
    Mueller, F.
    Robertson, T.
    Designing for the experiential body2014Ingår i: Proceeding CHI EA '14 CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, s. 1069-1073Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this panel is to reflect on the past and discuss the present and future of designing for an experiencing body in HCI. The motivation is to discuss the full range of rich body/movement-based experiences and how the CHI community can embrace and extend these perspectives on designing for the body. The panelists and audience will be asked to share their perspectives on what has most influenced thought in designing for the body, how new sensing technologies are crafting the HCI perspective, and where they see this line of research and design heading in the next ten years.

  • 25. Mentis, Helena M.
    et al.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    My Self and You: Tension in Bodily Sharing of Experience2014Ingår i: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 21, nr 4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing interest in designing systems for sharing experience through bodily interaction. To explore this design space, we built a probe system we named the Lega. In our 2-month-long research design process, we noted that the users' attention was set on their own reflective experience, rather than attending to the person(s) with which they were sharing their experience. To explain these findings, we present an inductive analysis of the data through a phenomenological lens to pinpoint what causes such behavior. Our analysis extends our understanding of how to design for social embodied interaction, pointing to how we need to embrace the tension between self-reflection and shared experience, making inward listening and social expression visible acts, accessible to social construction and understanding. It entails experiencing our embodied self as others experience us in order to build a dialogue.

  • 26.
    Obrist, Marianna
    et al.
    Newcastle University.
    Wright, Peter
    Newcastle University.
    Kuutti, Kari
    Oulu University.
    Rogers, Yvonne
    City University London.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Pyla, Pardha S.
    Freshin, J-L
    Theory and practice in ux research: uneasy bedfellows?2013Ingår i: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, s. 2433-2438Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We believe that it is time to talk about user experience and its theoretical roots as well as about the relationship between theory and practice in UX research. Although user experience is overused as a buzzword, it defines a main step change in the evolvement of the HCI field and deserves a proper (theoretical) attention. Within this panel we follow up on discussions on the theoretical foundations and the value of theory for HCI and UX research from over the last years. In particular we want to go a step further and strengthen the interdisciplinary dialogue on the relationship between theory and practice when talking about user experience. We invited panelists from academia and industry to join a fruitful dialogue talking about the different perspectives on user experience, theoretical roots, and the relevance of theory for practice and vice versa. Two moderators will ensure that the audience gets their beliefs and thoughts across to the panelists as well.

  • 27. Oulasvirta, A.
    et al.
    Tamminen, S.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Comparing two approaches to context: Realism and constructivism2005Ingår i: Critical Computing - Between Sense and Sensibility: Proceedings of the 4th Decennial Aarhus Conference, 2005, s. 195-198Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few years, there have been debates over what is context and how computers should act upon it. Two disparate camps of thought can be recognized. First, Realism, having its roots in natural sciences, believes that contexts exist out there and that, if properly instrumented and programmed, computers can correctly recognize and adapt to them. Second, Constructivism, having its roots in human and social sciences, believes that contexts are human creations, mental and social, and that computers ought to provide resources for managing them. We reveal some fundamental differences between the two in three different application domains. We show that despite the deep-going controversies, both camps benefit from considering the alternative approach and a middle ground can be found.

  • 28. Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    Vaara, Elsa
    SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Weymann, Claus
    Bylund, Markus
    Uppsala Kommun.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Peira, Nathalie
    Sjölinder, Marie
    SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Mind the body!: designing a mobile stress management application encouraging personal reflection2010Ingår i: In Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS '10). / [ed] ACM, ACM Digital Library, 2010, s. 47-56Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have designed a stress management biofeedback mobile service for everyday use, aiding users to reflect on both positive and negative patterns in their behavior. To do so, we embarked on a complex multidisciplinary design journey, learning that: detrimental stress results from complex processes related to e.g. the subjective experience of being able to cope (or not) and can therefore not be measured and diagnosed solely as a bodily state. We learnt that it is difficult, sometimes impossible, to make a robust analysis of stress symptoms based on biosensors worn outside the laboratory environment they were designed for. We learnt that rather than trying to diagnose stress, it is better to mirror short-term stress reactions back to them, inviting their own interpretations and reflections. Finally, we identified several experiential qualities that such an interface should entail: ambiguity and openness to interpretation, interactive history of prior states, fluency and aliveness.

  • 29.
    Sas, Corina
    et al.
    Lancaster University.
    Fratczak, T
    Rees, M
    Gellersen, Hans
    Kalnikaite, V
    Coman, A
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    AffectCam: arousal-augmented sensecam for richer recall of episodic memories2013Ingår i: CHI2013 Changing perspectives: extended abstracts : the 31st Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2013, s. 1041-1046Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of AffectCam, a wearable system integrating SenseCam and BodyMedia SenseWear for capturing galvanic skin response as a measure of bodily arousal. AffectCam's algorithms use arousal as a filtering mechanism for selecting the most personally relevant photos captured during people's ordinary daily life, i.e. high arousal photos. We discuss initial findings showing that emotional arousal does improve the quality of memory recall associated with emotionally arousing events. In particular, the high arousal photos support richer recall of episodic memories than low arousal ones, i.e. over 50% improvement. We also consider how various phenomenological characteristics of autobiographical memories such as event, emotions, thoughts, place and time are differently cued by the AffectCam.

  • 30.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Metaphone: an artistic exploration of biofeedback and machine aesthetics2013Ingår i: CHI EA '13 CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press , 2013, s. 2995-2998Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Metaphone is an interactive art piece that transforms biosensor data extracted from participants into colorful, evocative perceivable visual patterns on a big canvas. The biosensors register movement, pulse and skin conductance, the latter two relating to emotional arousal. The machine creates a traditional art form colorful paintings which can be contrasted with the pulsating, living body of the participants and the machine-like movements of the Metaphone. Participants interacting with the machine get their own painting drawn for them a highly involving activity spurring a whole range of questions around bio-sensing technologies. The participants engaging with Metaphone have to agree to share their personal data, thereby expanding the interactive discourse while questioning the extension of the body with the machine and involving participants with public exposition of their inner worlds.

  • 31.
    Simbelis, Vygandas 'Vegas'
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Vaara, Elsa
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Repurposing Bits and Pieces of the Digital2015Ingår i: 34TH ANNUAL CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, CHI 2016, ACM Digital Library, 2015, s. 840-851Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Repurposing refers to a broad set of practices, such as recycling or upcycling, all aiming to make better use of or give new life to physical materials and artefacts. While these practices have an obvious interest regarding sustainability issues, they also bring about unique aesthetics and values that may inspire design beyond sustainability concerns. What if we can harness these qualities in digital materials? We introduce Delete by Haiku, an application that transforms old mobile text messages into haiku poems. We elaborate on how the principles of repurposing - working on a low budget, introducing chance and combining the original values with the new ones - can inform interaction design in evoking some of these aesthetic values. This approach changes our views on what constitutes "digital materials" and the opportunities they offer. We also connect recent debates concerning ownership of data with discussions in the arts on the "Death of the Author."

  • 32. Stahl, Anna
    et al.
    Lowgren, Jonas
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Evocative Balance: Designing for Interactional Empowerment2014Ingår i: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 8, nr 1, s. 43-57Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose an experiential quality called evocative balance as key in designing for affective interaction that aims to empower users in and through the interaction. Evocative balance draws on the dual meaning of the word "evoke" in characterizing the user's sense that data and actions evoke familiar recollections of lived experience, yet are still open enough to evoke multiple interpretations in an ongoing process of co-constructive making of meaning. Our aim is to capture those experiences that resonate with our lived, everyday, social and bodily experiences; those experiences that we can recognise in ourselves and, through empathy, in others. We elaborate on and substantiate the meaning of this quality by means of retrospective reflection on three of our own design projects. This account provides detailed insights on how to find the balance between openness and familiarity through design.

  • 33.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    SICS.
    Reflecting on the Design Process of the Affective Diary2008Ingår i: Proeedings NordiChi, October 20-22, 2008, ACM Press, 2008, s. 559-564Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Affective Diary is a digital diary that makes use of bio-sensors to add some reminiscence of bodily experiences. The design process behind Affective Diary was ‘sensitive’ to three design qualities extracted from a previous project; providing cues of emotional expressivity building on familiarity, making the design open for personal expressivity and be aware of contradictions between modalities. Through the design process of Affective Diary, with frequent user involvements during the process, these design qualities became further tested, developed and refi ned. By providing a fairly detailed and refl ected description of the design process behind Affective Diary, we aim to provide other designers with inspiration on several levels: both in terms of methods used, but also in why these three design qualities are important and how to realize them. Our aim is also to provide designers with knowledge in the form that makes sense to designers: the practical link between design qualities and fi nal results.

  • 34.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    SICS.
    Kosmack-Vaara, Elsa
    SICS.
    REFLECTING ON THE DESIGN PROCESS OF AFFECTIVE HEALTH2011Ingår i: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research / [ed] Roozenburg, Chen and Stappers, 2011, s. 1-12Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the design process behind a bio-sensorbased wellness-system, named Affective Health, aimed to help users to get into biofeedback loops as well as find patterns in their bodily reactions over time. By discussing details of the design process, we provide a reflected account of the particular design we arrived at. Three design qualities are used to both generate and evaluate the different design sketches. They are, in short, (1) the design must feel familiar to users, mirroring their experience of themselves, (2) creating designs that leave space for users’ own interpretation of their body data, and (3) that the modalities used in the design does not contradict one-another, but instead harmonize, helping users to make sense of the representation. The final user encounter of the Affective Health system shows that those design qualities were indeed both useful and important to users’ experience of the interaction.

  • 35.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    SICS.
    Sundström, Petra
    SICS.
    A Foundation for Emotional Expressivity2005Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To express emotions to others in mobile text messaging in our view require designs that can both capture some of the ambiguity and subtleness that characterizes emotional interaction and keep the media specific qualities. Through the use of a body movement analysis and a dimensional model of emotion experiences, we arrived at a design for a mobile messaging service, eMoto. The service makes use of the sub-symbolic expressions; colors, shapes and animations, for expressing emotions in an open-ended way. Here we present the design process and a user study of those expressions, where the results show that the use of these sub-symbolic expressions can work as a foundation to use as a creative tool, but still allowing for the communication to be situated. The inspiration taken from body movements proved to be very useful as a design input. It was also reflected in the way our subjects described the expressions.

  • 36.
    Ståhl, Anna
    et al.
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    SICS.
    Taylor, Alex
    Combetti, Marco
    Experiencing the Affective Diary2009Ingår i: Journal of personal and ubiquitous computing, ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 13, nr 5, s. 365-378Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A diary is generally considered to be a book in which one keeps a regular record of events and experiences that have some personal significance. As such, it provides a useful means to privately express inner thoughts or to reflect on daily experiences, helping in either case to put them in perspective. Taking conventional diary keeping as our starting point, we have designed and built a digital diary, named Affective Diary, with which users can scribble their notes, but that also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors and mobile media to be collected from users’ mobile phones. A premise that underlies the presented work is one that views our bodily experiences as integral to how we come to interpret and thus make sense of the world.

    We present our investigations into this design space in three related lines of inquiry: (i) a theoretical grounding for affect and bodily experiences; (ii) a user-centred design process, arriving at the Affective Diary system; and (iii) an exploratory end-user study of the Affective Diary with 4 users during several weeks of use. Through these three inquiries, our overall aim has been to explore the potential of a system that interleaves the physical and cultural features of our embodied experiences and to further examine what media-specific qualities such a design might incorporate. Concerning the media-specific qualities, the key appears to be to find a suitable balance where a system does not dictate what should be interpreted and, at the same time, lends itself to enabling the user to participate in the interpretive act. In the exploratory end-user study users, for the most part, were able to identify with the body memorabilia and together with the mobile data, it enabled them to remember and reflect on their past. Two of our subjects went even further and found patterns in their own bodily reactions that caused them to learn something about themselves and even attempt to alter their own behaviours.

  • 37.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Ståhl, A
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    A user-centered approach to affective interaction2005Ingår i: AFFECTIVE COMPUTING AND INTELLIGENT INTERACTION, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Tao, J; Picard, RW, BERLIN: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2005, Vol. 3784, s. 931-938Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have built eMoto, a mobile service for sending and receiving affective messages, with the explicit aim of addressing the inner experience of emotions. eMoto is a designed artifact that carries emotional experiences only achieved through interaction. Following on the theories of embodiment, we argue emotional experiences can not be design in only design for. eMoto is the result of a user-centered design approach, realized through a set of initial brainstorming methods, a persona, a Laban-analysis of body language and a two-tiered evaluation method. eMoto is not a system that could have been designed from theory only, but require an iterative engagement with end-users, however, in combination with theoretical work. More specifically, we will show how we have managed to design an ambiguous and open system that allows for users' emotional engagement.

  • 38.
    Sundström, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV. SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV. SICS.
    In situ informants exploring an emotional mobile messaging system in their everyday practice2007Ingår i: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 65, nr 4, s. 388-403Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We have designed and built a mobile emotional messaging system named eMoto. With it, users can compose messages through using emotion-related gestures as input, rendering a message background of colours, shapes and animations expressing the emotional content. The design intent behind eMoto was that it should be engaging physically, intellectually and socially, and allow users to express themselves emotionally in all those dimensions, involving them in an affective loop experience. In here, we describe the user-centred design process that lead to the eMoto system, but focus mainly on the final study where we let five friends use eMoto for two weeks. The study method, which we name in situ informants, helped us enter and explore the subjective and distributed experiences of use, as well as how emotional communication unfolds in everyday practice when channelled through a system like eMoto. The in situ informants are on the one hand users of eMoto, but also spectators, that is close friends who observe and document user behaviour. Design conclusions include the need to support the sometimes fragile communication rhythm that friendships require – expressing memories of the past, sharing the present and planning for the future. We saw that emotions are not singular state that exist within one person alone, but permeates the total situation, changing and drifting as a process between the two friends communicating. We also gained insights into the under-estimated but still important physical, sensual aspects of emotional communication. Experiences of the in situ informants method include the need to involve participants in the interpretation of the data obtained, as well as establishing a closer connection with the spectators.

  • 39. Tscheligi, M.
    et al.
    Obrist, M.
    Isbister, K.
    Busch, M.
    Hochleitner, C.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    "Touch me" - Workshop on tactile user experience evaluation methods2014Ingår i: Proceeding CHI EA '14 CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, s. 41-44Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop we plan to explore the possibilities and challenges of physical objects and materials for evaluating the User Experience (UX) of interactive systems. These objects should face shortfalls of current UX evaluation methods and allow for a qualitative (or even quantitative), playful and holistic evaluation of UX - without interfering with the users' personal experiences during interaction. This provides a tactile enhancement to a solely visual stimulation as used in classical evaluation methods. The workshop serves as a basis for networking and community building with interested HCI researchers, designers and practitioners and should encourage further development of the field of tactile UX evaluation.

  • 40.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    The throat III: disforming operatic voices through a novel interactive instrument2013Ingår i: Proceedings of CHI 2013 Extended Abstracts, ACM Press, 2013, s. 3007-3010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Practitioner-led artistic research, combined with interactive technologies, opens up new and unexplored design spaces. Here we focus on the creation of a tool for opera-singers to dynamically disform, change and accompany their voices. In an opera composed by one of the authors, the title-role singer needed to be able to alter his voice to express hawking, coughing, snuffling and other disturbing vocal qualities associated with the lead role Joseph Merrick, aka "The Elephant Man". In our designerly exploration, we were guided by artistic experiences from the opera tradition and affordances of the technology at hand. The resulting instrument, The Throat III, is a singer-operated artefact that embodies and extends particular notions of operatic singing techniques while at the same time creating accompaniment. It therefore becomes an emancipatory tool, putting a spotlight on some of the power hierarchies between singers, composers, conductors, and stage directors in the operatic world.

  • 41.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    The Vocal Chorder: Empowering opera singers with a large interactive instrument2014Ingår i: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, s. 1001-1010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With The Vocal Chorder, a large interactive instrument to create accompaniment, opera singers can get more power over the performance. The device allows performers to interactively accompany themselves through pushing, leaning on and bending steel wires. The design was guided by the unique needs of the solo-singer, explored through autobiographical design and material explorations, some on stage, and later tested by other singers. We discuss how designing for opera and for the stage requires extraordinary durability and how opera performances can change with a bodilyoriented instrument such as The Vocal Chorder. Through a designerly exploration, we arrived at a device that offered (1) a tool for singers to take control over the rhythmical pace and overall artistic and aesthetic outcome of their performances, (2) an enriched sense of embodiment between their voice and the overall performance; and (3) a means to empower opera singers on stage.

  • 42.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Interacting with the Vocal Chorder: Re-empowering the Opera Diva2014Ingår i: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    With The Vocal Chorder, a large interactive instrument to create accompaniment, opera singers can get more power over the performance. The device allows performers to interactively accompany themselves through pushing, leaning on, and bending steel wires. The design was guided by the unique needs of the solo-singer, explored through autobiographical design and material explorations on stage, and later tested by other singers. Through our designerly exploration, we arrived at a device that offered (1) a tool for singers to appropriate and take control over the rhythmical pace and overall artistic and aesthetic outcome of their performances, (2) an enriched sense of embodiment between their voice and the overall performance; and (3) a means to empower opera singers on stage.

  • 43.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Akner Koler, Cheryl
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Boudet, Sebastien
    Felt Time, From Sourdough Baking to Interaction Design2017Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 44.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. SICS, Swedish ICT.
    Harper, Richard
    School of Computing and Communications (SCC).
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Hagnell, Fredrik
    Clapping Time, Reading Time, Time in Interaction2017Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 45.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    Mobile Life, Swedish Institute of Computer Science.
    Höök, Kristina
    Stockholm University .
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University .
    Mirroring Bodily Reactions Over Time2009Ingår i: Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing System., ACM Digital Library, 2009, s. 4471-4476Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Affective Health system is a mobile lifestyle application that aims to empower people to reflect on their lives and lifestyles. The system logs a mixture of biosensor-data and other contextually oriented data and transforms these to a colorful, animated expression on their mobiles. It is intended to create a mirror and thereby empower users to see activity patterns and relate these to their experiences of stress. People’s different cultural backgrounds and their different physiological and psychological composition give them different perceptions and associations of time. We explore the time dimension of our system through working through a set of different designs that organize events as time going linearly forward, in a circular movement or relating to geographical places. Here we discuss the process of designing a mobile interface for presenting temporal data in a way that allows multiple and subjective interpretation. 

  • 46.
    Vaara, Elsa
    et al.
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Silvasan, Iuliana
    Technical University of Cluj N{apoca, Romania.
    Ståhl, Anna
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile life centre, Sweden .
    Temporal Relations in Affective Health2010Ingår i: In Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction:: Extending Boundaries / [ed] ACM, ACM Press, 2010, s. 833-838Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Affective Health project we explore possibilities of how to, through biofeedback support users in making sense of the relationship between their stress and their behavior in everyday life. Affective Health is a tool for visualizing patterns and trends of bodily and contextual information. It is particularly important that the design reflects changes over time as this is how people start recognizing patterns in their own behavior and connect it to their bodily reactions. We spent substantial effort sketching and testing ways of portraying time that would move us away from more mathematically inspired representations such as for example graphs and calendars. Instead, we want users to see the signals our bodies emit as part of themselves, of their own ways of being in the world, alive, acting and reacting to their environment. We have explored many possible, alternative ways of visualizing biofeedback over time. For example as the relation between different places and with time as different layers of history in a concept inspired from ecology. The latest and most developed concept is a cyclic repetition of biodata mapped on a spiral shape.

  • 47.
    Šimbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Solsona, Jordi
    KTH, Skolan för informations- och kommunikationsteknik (ICT), Elektroniksystem.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Metaphone: Machine aesthetics meets interaction design2014Ingår i: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, s. 1-10Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Through our art project, Metaphone, we explored a particular form of aesthetics referred to in the arts tradition as machine aesthetics. The Metaphone machine collects the participant's bio-data, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Heart Rate (HR), creating a process of movement, painting and sound. The machine behaves in machine-like, aesthetically evocative ways: A shaft on two large wheels rotates on the floor, carrying paint that is dripped onto a large sheet of aquarelle paper on the floor according to bio-sensor data. A soundscape rhythmically follows the bio-sensor data, but also has its own machine-like sounds. Six commentators were invited to interact with the machine. They reported a strangely relaxing atmosphere induced by the machine. Based on these experiences we discuss how different art styles can help to describe aesthetics in interaction design generally, and how machine aesthetics in particular can be used to create interesting, sustained, stylistically coherent interactions.

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