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  • 1.
    Buck, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Arekrans, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gordin, Philip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Increasing Exploration Capabilities Through Employee Entrepreneur Interaction2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The automotive industry is in a time of great environmental change. Due to new competitors and new technologies, the established OEMs are looking for ways to increase their exploration capability. One of the measures that are taken is the collaboration with start-ups.

    Within this study 13 interviews were performed and analyzed to see the effects of these collaborations. The objective was to see what challenges the employees of the OEM were facing and how they were acting during these collaborations with a focus on if these behaviors were entrepreneurial.

    Different challenges were found. Lack of organizational support, bureaucracy, hierarchy, and processes, the motivation of employees, as well as the experience at the company. Employees showed entrepreneurial behavior in two different ways during the collaborations. By being an ambassador for the start-up within the corporation and by adapting ways of working from the start-ups.

  • 2.
    Buck, Lennart
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The role of ambassador in start-up collaborations2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this research is to see which challenges the individuals on the OEM’s side meet during asymmetrical collaborations and which approaches they use to overcome them.

    Literature was focused very much on the managerial view of solving challenges in these collaborations. This study shows that individuals could play a major role in resolving challenges that occur in asymmetrical collaborations. The profound effect of individuals could resemble that of individuals in other fields, e.g. champions in innovation.

    To gain insight, 34 interviews within an automotive OEM were performed with project leaders of collaborations that were done with start-ups. These interviews were investigated by coding. These codes were analyzed once via text mining to get an overarching view, and once with traditional coding to get more nuanced and detailed insights.

    Four major challenges were found. Mismatches in processes, lack of time and capacity, potentially unknown stakeholders, and the assessment of the start-up. These challenges were approached through a variety of measures by the interviewees. Coaching the start-up, designing a proof-of-project, using the personal network, effective communication, explaining and shielding of the start-up, and implementing new processes in the start-up. The role that is described by these tasks shall be called the ambassador role. Implementing this role in a company enables individuals to facilitate asymmetrical collaborations. However, it is suggested that there should also be an institution established that is aware of the best-practices and therefore able to educate new ambassadors.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kullström, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The consequences of managerial controls for digital innovation projects2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization has provided new opportunities for firms in the manufacturing industry but also brought a wide range of new challenges. This paper focuses managerial controls in order to further our understanding in what managers can do in order to manage and support digital innovation projects. More specifically the aim of this paper is to explore the role of managerial controls for digital innovation projects in manufacturing firms. Data has been collected from two manufacturing firms through interviews. The results further our understanding of the consequences of different managerial controls for digital innovation projects. Surprisingly the findings show that digital innovation projects demand more control than regular projects. The results bring a number of managerial implications, 1) there is a need to deliberately use a combination of controls, 2) it is important to use controls also for decision making, both in terms of speed and the ability to make good decisions and 3) there is a need to have controls also for customers and partners

  • 4.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Planning Industrial PhD projects in practice: Speaking both 'Academia' and 'Practitionese'2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED11): Design Education / [ed] Culley, S.J.; Hicks, B.J.; McAloone, T.C.; Howard, T.J. & Ion, B., Copenhagen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discuss the planning and organising of research conducted by Industrial PhD students, i.e. PhD students conducting research studies aiming for a PhD while employed in industrial companies. Industrial PhD projects within engineering design research in Sweden can be considered a phenomenon, i.e. existing but sparsely documented. This paper provides empirical illustrations by presenting three Industrial PhD projects conducted in three companies with product developing operations in Sweden. The specific research design of Industrial PhD projects provides benefits such as an effective bridging between academia and industry. Additionally, this type of research projects face challenges, such as having two-folded aims of the project: both academic and industrial goals. Based on experiences from these projects, implications for planning and organising of future Industrial PhD projects are discussed. Finally, we suggest that Industrial PhD projects are effective means, if used properly, for assimilation of research findings to industry, and for academia to understand the industrial practice.

  • 5.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blaus, Johan
    KTH.
    Snickars, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Impact and beyond in research centres: university-industry collaboration in material sciences2015In: Proceedings XIII Triple Helix conference, Beijing, August 2015. Panel session: University-Industry relationships, Beijing, China, 2015, Vol. Panel 5, p. 158-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the role of research centres in realising universities‟ impact strategy. From the university management‟s perspective, this raises questions about how a university more systematically can organize and manage effective environments to stimulate both academic excellence and societal impact. The analysis draws on experiences from a centre in the area of material sciences with an explicit ambition to generate impact through engaging in research and education activities together with industry. The study aims to build knowledge on what type of impact goals these centres are targeting and what impact mechanisms that are considered important in order to achieve these goals. The results show that the centre has established mechanisms for close-knitted collaborative research, which also create an in-depth understanding among collaborators about areas of application of new materials and the diverse range of research work in the centre. This facilitates translation activities to form more fundamental research questions from industry‟s practical needs. Four areas of impact are identified: 1) tools and methods saving time, money and materials 2) skilled people 3) solutions of theoretical problems; and 4) development of absorptive capacity and science-signalling trough co-publications between industry partners and centre researchers. Conclusions about scope of impact, in the Swedish case, are presented in relation to recent university policy in UK, also discussing key themes of centres as impact creators.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring problem finding in a medical device company2012In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning in a medical device company aiming to identify opportunities for both incremental and radical innovation. The study seeks to address the present gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. Design/methodology/approach: The implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning to support the identification and analysis of opportunities for radical and incremental innovation and its related challenges is described and analyzed. Experiences and observations from a single case study, conducted in an R&D organization in an international medical device company during two years forms the basis for the study. During 2009-2011 an empirical investigation at an R&D unit composed of 200 employees at a Swedish site in an international medical device company, known as a market and pioneering leader was conducted. A qualitative evaluation and analysis was utilized using the gathering of relevant data from specified documents and surveys, compilation of databases in use for external information search, observations during formal meetings and semi-structured interviews with individuals representing different departments and hierarchical levels to collect substantive and relevant data. Findings: The study points to the importance of balancing the degree of formalization in the process in order to motivate different individuals and to create learning and innovation outcomes. Research limitations/implications: The study contributes to the body of innovation management literature by providing empirical data on how companies are organizing work to systematically acquire and use information about events and trends in the external environment defined as environmental scanning as means for building innovation capabilities in practice. Practical implications: The selection of direction and scope of search, the design and implementation of the scanning process and IT tool, the mechanisms needed to integrate different hierarchical levels and functions to identify new ideas and strategy implications are found to be factors critical to manage. Originality/value: This study provides rich multi-level longitudinal empirical data and addresses the current gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. It specifically contributes to the need to better understand how firms build capabilities to identify opportunities and problems in the early phases of product innovation when aiming to generate both radical and incremental innovations.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Making innovation everyone´s business: Using routines and controls2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary high-technology companies are under pressure to deliver short-term profits and to serve the market demands for future innovative solutions. An increased interest for alternative innovations such as new services or business models to be recognized in parallel to new technologies results in that companies are increasingly attempting to engage all their employees in innovation. This requires attention to what ways of working need to be changed in order to better support employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives i.e. to realize ideas that are aligned to and those that deviate from a company´s existing strategy and operational models. A key challenge is related to understanding how to develop organizational routines; how to make use of management controls to support both types of initiatives despite their different needs and, make the changes in routines and controls become accepted throughout the organization. Surprisingly few studies deal with understanding how managers or assigned employees in companies go about to address these issues.

    The overall purpose of this thesis is to increase knowledge on how innovation capabilities are built when involving a broad base of employees in innovation in large and mature organizations. More specifically, this thesis seeks to understand what characterizes organizational routines and what are the consequences from using different types of management controls supporting employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives. The thesis is made up of four qualitative studies that explore how a planned effort to deliberately involve a broad base of employees in innovation is performed and experienced by actors representing different hierarchical levels and functions in two large and world-leading high-technology companies.

    The research shows how involving employees in innovation can be made possible through a conscious and creative design and usage of routines and controls. The thesis shows that an upper management call for an increased number of induced and autonomous initiatives results in the use of diverse approaches to achieve this goal even within the same organization due to personal beliefs and experiences of what innovation needs and due to a bias towards either personnel or action management controls. Further, a strong focus on developing organizational routines to initiate innovation was observed at the expense of routines for selection and development of new initiatives. The studies show also that the outcome is dominated by incremental process improvements and the underlying reason to this result is discussed in this thesis.

    Four characteristics were identified that distinguish organizational routines used in settings successfully supporting employees in pursuing both induced and autonomous initiatives : i) routines targeting selection, development and retention in an innovation process, ii) routines were frequently used and were somewhat linked to other routines, iii) routines to support resource owners and/or customers to come in direct contact with innovators to evaluate and develop new ideas in an atmosphere characterized by a mix of playfulness and seriousness were developed and finally iv) a combination of personnel and actions controls were used. Implications for innovation management, organizational routine and management control research are discussed.

    Finally, a re-thinking and re-design of the performance management is suggested, taking into consideration the potential in using measurement and goal setting to provide effective means to support both induced and autonomous initiatives. The studies showed that the use of performance measurement can act as a trigger for managers to take actions. In addition, the thesis identified the value in improving the understanding of how result controls, specifically goals, can be formulated and used to stimulate different types of innovative behaviors.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Developing radical innovations: Introducing Tangibility, Tolerance and Tightness2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates what actions can be taken in order to support the development

    of radical innovations. The contribution adds to our understanding of how radical

    innovation projects develops over time and what and how managerial actions can be

    taken in order to support this development. Six radical innovation projects from two

    different empirical settings have been investigated though semi-structured interviews

    and the use of a project journey mapping technique allowing for a combination of both

    narrative and critical incident data collection. The data was analyzed in Nvivo. The

    results revealed three different flows of activities for radical innovation projects that

    iteratively and interactively took place over time from the emergence of the idea to

    commercialization, namely: (1) the configuration of the product system, (2) the

    understanding of customer value and (3) the experimentation of understanding of how

    to monetizing value form radical innovation projects. Three mechanisms in order to

    manage these flows are presented: (1) making the radical innovation and its potential

    more tangible, (2) creating a tolerance for the uncertainties and ambiguities related to

    the innovation during its development in the organization and (3) handling the

    management control tightness of the project in order for it to make it to the

    commercialization. Two main practical implications of the results are discussed. First

    of all, organizations that aim to develop radical innovations need to understand and

    support the three different flows of activities early on and what it implies in terms of

    competences needed and resources allocated. Second, the presented mechanisms

    provide distinct examples of actions that can be taken in order to support the

    development flows of radical innovations.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Management controls and ambidexterity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Malmberg, Patrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    In Search of Problems Worth Solving - Exploring the Management of External Knowledge to Build Innovation Capabilities in a Medical Device Company2012In: IFKAD - KCWS 2012: 7th International Forum On Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 5th Knowledge Cities World Summit: Knowledge, Innovation And Sustainability: Integrating Micro & Macro Perspectives / [ed] Schiuma, G; Spender, JC; Yigitcanlar, T, 2012, p. 2455-2487Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - In this paper, the implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning to support the identification and analysis of opportunities for radical and incremental innovation is described and analysed. Experiences and observations from a single case study, conducted in an R&D organization in an international medical device company during two years forms the basis for the study. The study contributes to the body of innovation management literature by providing empirical data on how companies are organizing work to systematically acquire and use information about events and trends in the external environment defined as environmental scanning as means for building innovation capabilities in practice. Design/methodology/approach - During 2009-2011 an empirical investigation at an R&D unit composed of 200 employees at a Swedish site in an international medical device company, known as a market and pioneering leader was conducted. A qualitative evaluation and analysis was utilized using the gathering of relevant data from specified documents and surveys, compilation of databases in use for external information search, observations during formal meetings and semi-structured interviews with individuals representing different departments and hierarchical levels to collect substantive and relevant data. Originality/value - This study provide rich multi-level longitudinal empirical data and addresses the current gap in research on how firms are working to create new knowledge improve based on external information and knowledge as means to build innovation capabilities in practice. It specifically contributes to the need to better understand how firms build capabilities to identify opportunities and problems in the early phases of product innovation when aiming to generate both radical and incremental innovations. Practical implications - The selection of direction and scope of search, the design and implementation of the scanning process and IT tools, the mechanisms needed to integrate different hierarchical levels and functions to identify new ideas and strategy implications are found to be factors critical to manage. The result from the study points to the importance of balancing the degree of formalization in the process in order to motivate different individuals and to create learning and innovation outcomes.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating organizational routines to foster innovation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the Use of Innovation Performance Measurement to Build Innovation Capability in a Medical Device Company2014In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase their innovation capability, many organizations make the effort to actively change their R&D working practices. In parallel, measurement is an important issue with regard to managing innovation. In this paper, innovation management and measurement theory are combined with empirical investigations of experiences of using measurement as a support to the development of innovation capability in practice. The paper reports results from analysis of measurement data and a semi-structured interview study, encompassing 19 interviews with managers and engineers involved in the current change activities of the case company. The study reveals that various innovation measurement mechanisms are used in different departments in the R&D organization, reflecting the diverse views of what constitutes innovation that dominate in each group, as well as the group's level of involvement in the on-going building of innovation capability - from heavily involved (innovation leaders) to attentiveness from a distance (innovation laggards and progress evaluators). This, together with challenges related to identifying relevant metrics to support both incremental and radical innovation and managing existing reward and goal-setting systems, is seen to have implications on the capability development in the organization requiring attention to how innovation measurement is designed, implemented and used in practice.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Manage To Measure And Measure To Manage: Experiences From Using Performance Measurement In The Early Phases Of Product Innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Selecting and developing organizational routines to support innovationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating conditions conducive to innovation requires companies to consider a broad range of aspects and not the least identifying and implementing new processes and routines. The purpose of this paper is to address what innovation routines are selected and developed in a company with the ambition to involve a broad base of its employees in innovation. It investigates the similarities and differences of organizational routines selected in four different units in a large global R&D organization and analyses reasons to and consequences of these differences. The study shows that how innovation is regarded in an organization will play an important role, that addressing innovation as a process is critical and that the conflicts emerging when people strive to create new routines that largely deviate from normal operations can become a valuable source for innovation capabilities. By combining innovation management research with recent organizational routines literature this paper is able to identify some interesting patterns both when it comes to how innovation routines are selected and developed and when it comes to what routine characteristics can be more or less effectively combined to support innovation. The study aims to contribute to the emerging literature exploring intra-organizational evolution of ideas and routines.

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh-Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovating every day: making innovation everyone´s businessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efforts of a large company when assigning everyone in the organization to work with innovation, and its implication on managing radical and incremental innovation. The analysis rests on an interview investigation within a global high-technology company with 31 managers in different contexts. These managers have been identified as top performers on innovation in an employee survey conducted in the organization. The study illustrates how a large mature organization has involved a broad base of its employees in innovation, emphasizing that innovation is a daily effort and the actions performed in different parts of the organization. The results reveal that it is feasible to both empower people in the organization by having a bottom-up approach supporting daily incremental innovation and combine this with more systematic approaches for managing and enabling radical innovation.

  • 16.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wallin, Johanna
    Benaim, Andre
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Berntsson, Richard
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Re-thinking Innovation Measurement to Manage Innovation-Related Dichotomies in Practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing radical innovation or innovation management as usual2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    CONSIDERATIONS FOR AN INNOVATION MEASUREMENT SYSTEM SUPPORTING  CHANGES TOWARDS INCREASED INNOVATION CAPABILITY IN PRACTICE2011In: 12th Continuous Innovation Network Conference (CINET), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing and implementing a method to build innovation capability in product development teams2013In: Proceedings of iced13 volume 6: design information and knowledge, The Design Society, 2013, Vol. 6 DS75-06, p. 199-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework and process (MINT) to support product development teams that have an ambition to improve their capability to manage both radical and incremental innovation. The driving force for the method was a clearly expressed need from teams to be able to measure and direct and change their own innovation work practice. The paper encompasses a longitudinal collaboration between academia and industry and aims to contribute to the development of a deeper understanding of how to successfully implement design research results in practice as called for by the design research community. The MINT method which is outlined in the paper has been developed and successfully adopted to the need of different teams in several companies. The learning outcome from the research project is analysed and three categories of critical factors which relates to the design, content and implementation process of the method are discussed and compared to relevant innovation and change management literature.

  • 20.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Identification of new opportunities2009In: Organising for innovation and growth: Experiences and efforts in ten companies / [ed] Marianne Döös, Lena Wilhelmson, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovative teams in St. Jude Medical AB: new opportunities identification2009In: High Road Strategy for Innovation, VINNOVA , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Introducing management controls in an entrepreneurial company and its influence on achieving ambidexterity2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of how combinations of management controls are introduced and influencing a small entrepreneurial company over time. Particularly, it studies why these controls are introduced and how they are influencing the company´s ability to achieve ambidexterity i.e. to be flexible and innovative and yet enable the efficiency required. Using a combination of interviews and document analysis in an entrepreneurial clean-tech firm rich data on the emergence of management controls is collected. The preliminary analysis shows that drivers for introducing management controls goes from external to internal factors over time and that personnel controls slowly are replaced by more formal processes until the firm experience a fast growth in size. In this phase, the organisation is seen to intensively introduce both more formal processes and structures in parallel to a strong focus on a consciously strengthen its entrepreneurial cultural to achieve ambidexterity. The study is able to put some light on challenges related to how small entrepreneurial companies are managing an ambition to remain innovative while increasing its level of management control as a response to its growing in size. The result from the study indicates that the types of management controls in use over time builds on each other and that the introduction of management controls to manage innovation is particularly challenging.

  • 23.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing the Tensions to Achieve Ambidexterity in a Small Growing Frim2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we report on what tensions arise, as a small growing clean tech company attempt to keep their innovative culture, while striving to improve their efficiency. The company provides a particularly interesting case as it is in a midst of a strong growth phase in combination with that its management has both an awareness of and a willingness to take bold actions to achieve an ambidextrous organization. Both managers and employees are interviewed complementing the rather single sided focus on managers in existing literature. The two groups are found to have different views on what tensions are most crucial to manage; managers tend to focus on handling the tension between innovation understood as idea generation and efficiency while employees found the tension arising from managers inability to make decisions on what innovation projects to select more crucial. In addition, employees found the internal effort to increase sales and administrative process efficiency enabling also for innovation and do not perceive a tension between innovation and efficiency. Based in the study the use of a shared leadership model with a clear division between sensing and developing opportunities and managing procedures for efficiency is identified as a novel and interesting approach for achieving ambidexterity

  • 24.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Change Mechanisms for Increasing Innovation Capability2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation in teams: inducing action by defining challenges and indicators2012In: Proceedings of the 19th International Product Development, Management Conference, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Research Based Experimentation for Increasing Innovation Capaiblity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27. Schmidt, D. M.
    et al.
    Schenkl, S. A.
    Munkhart, E.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mortl, M.
    Interview study: Decisions and decision criteria for development in industry2014In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, 2014, p. 297-301Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making in early stages of product development affects product success essentially. For this reason, the professional handling and management of decisions in early development stages is necessary. To investigate current decision-making in industry, we conducted an interview study to quantify decision criteria, which decision makers from industry base their decisions on. Dependent on a list of decision criteria from literature, several employees from RandD departments were interviewed and the interviews were analyzed regarding decision criteria. Most important decision criteria are the financial aspect, customer requirements and product-technical feasibility. However, interviewees did not mention a few other criteria, which were mentioned in literature.

1 - 27 of 27
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