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  • 1.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Edge AI Driven Technology Advancements Paving Way towards New Capabilities2020In: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770, article id 2040005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As industries hold the opportunity to embrace artificial intelligence (AI) driven innovation, their success to a significant extent will depend on the value the new technology generates for different business stakeholder groups. This is in turn dependent upon how management can embrace these techniques and change as companies will frequently need to transform both internal processes and offerings to customers in order to reap the benefits of AI. AI is a growing research area currently concentrated around technology and modeling of techniques and yet only few examples and limited research are available, on how AI technology enables new capabilities that can impact the value delivered as well as radically transform it. We thus need to understand what new capabilities these technologies bring about and how they are used. Based on three concrete empirical quasi-experiments, interviews conducted with start-ups and a Swedish industrial manufacturing firm dealing with outdoor power products (like grass-cutters, chain-saws, concrete-saws, etc.) for professional and consumer use and using an analytical framework derived from the Resource Based View, this paper explores capabilities enabled through Edge AI and the competitive advantage these may offer. Specific capabilities (self-calibration, enhanced-sensing, selective-capture and reputation) are identified and implications for theory are discussed, pointing out the importance to consider this type of technology not only as a resource, but rather as a dynamic capability in itself.

  • 2.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Simonsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hald, Kim Sundtoft
    Johanson, Anders
    KTH.
    Value-capture in digital servitization2022In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 986-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to explore the perception of value delivered in digital servitization in a business-to-business context of incumbent manufacturing firms. We investigate how individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) influence and affect the adoption of such digital servitization strategies. The observations are made through a survey and empirical assessment across a couple of large industrial organizations interested in servitization and digitalization. Findings contribute to the existing literature on digital servitization and business model innovation by suggesting that IEO influence perceived value in delivering digital service offers, whereas functional affiliation does not. Further observations suggest that digital capabilities can become a crucial enabler for the perception of value delivered in digital business models by providing swift access to data for affected stakeholders.

  • 3.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Swan, Erik
    Axelsson Lejon, Ulf
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Value Changes during Service Delivery2021In: 2021 IEEE International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation (ICE/ITMC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most industries are shifting from product-orientedbusiness models towards services to step up the value chain andengage in long-term relationships with their customersthroughout the service lifecycle. Digital technologies arecontributing to servitization in many ways by creating andenabling capabilities like connectivity, IoT, data generation andassessment, etc., for new value generation, distribution, andcapture. Because value is subjective, dynamic, and changes duringthe service lifecycle, service providers need to examine closely thevalue perceptions of customers to constantly provide better valueand remain relevant with the competition. Through a consumersurvey and a longitudinal study of thirteen customers, this paperuses qualitative and quantitative assessment to identify the valuedimensions that play a major role for customers being onboardedon a digital enabled service, and also highlights how customervalue dimensions change over the course of the service lifecycle.One important finding is that change in customer value perceptiondoes not follow a pattern and is highly individual and personal.This opens a discussion regarding the need for hyperpersonalizationin successful servitization, and the role of digitaltechnologies towards the same.

  • 4.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability aspects in the concept generation of defence systems2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost escalation for fighter aircraft is arguably not sustainable. Pushing frontiers of technology by incremental improvements of traditional platforms has led to an exponential increase in cost. This paper addresses the process of concept generation with the purpose to explore how affordability is managed in that process, in order to identify possible measures to improve the likelihood of generating affordable concepts. This is done by studying two cases of concept generation of future combat air systems. The concepts generated in these two cases are however not curbing the cost escalation and are, with only one notable exception, based on incremental innovation. Nevertheless, the empirical observations offer leads to potentially foster a more innovative and cost conscious concept generation process, indicating avenues for future research.

  • 5.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability Aspects in the Development of Defence Equipment: Case Studies of Concept Generation in the Defence Industry2020In: Defence and Peace Economics, ISSN 1024-2694, E-ISSN 1476-8267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost escalation for many complex defence equipment is arguably not sustainable. Customer driven requirements have led to an exponential increase in costs by pushing frontiers of technology to support primarily incremental improvements of traditional equipment concepts. Accordingly, affordability has become a more discussed subject in defence acquisition. This paper addresses the process of generating complex defence equipment concepts. The purpose is to explore how affordability is managed in that process and to identify possible leads to how an unsustainable cost escalation for this type of equipment can be curbed. This is done by studying two cases of concept generation of future combat air equipment systems from a company process perspective. This applied micro perspective on cost escalation showed that none of the concepts generated in these two cases were assessed to curb the cost escalation. Further, the innovation model for the generated concepts, with only one notable exception, was incremental. Nevertheless, the empirical observations from these two cases offer leads on how to potentially foster a more innovative and affordability-oriented concept generation process for future defence equipment, as well as indicating avenues for future research.

  • 6.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability Management And Its Influence On Concept Development2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION BARRIERS: EXPLORING VALUE NETWORK INERTIA IN COMPLEX LOW-VOLUME PRODUCTS2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION IN COMPLEX PRODUCT SYSTEMS (COPS): INFLUENCING CHARACTERISTICS AND CONDITIONSManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex product systems (CoPS) tend to get more complex for every new productgeneration, which for some product categories imply cumbersome escalating costs. Forthese products, promises of lowered costs by disruptive innovation certainly areappealing, but frequently deluding. Therefore, this paper aims at exploring specific CoPScharacteristics and conditions influencing companies’ propensity to develop disruptiveproducts, and to derive related managerial implications. This is performed by analysingfour case studies of CoPS product development in four different industrial sectors. Thestudy suggests that specific characteristics and conditions in the CoPS setting influenceproduct development management to aim at incremental improvements of earlier productconcepts, whereby disruptive innovations in reality rarely get a chance. Moreover, it isfound that barriers for disruptive innovation in CoPS classified as tournament goods areconsidered even higher, because this product category generally do not offer anyperformance oversupply.

  • 9.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Swedish Defence University, Sweden.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FACILITATING PATH CHANGE: A HISTORICAL SUCCESS STORY OF PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing Affordability?: Observations From An Experimental Study Of Concept Generation2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early preliminary concepts are claimed to have a profound impact on the final product. Since these concepts often are based on intuitive judgements, it is important that these judgements are appropriate for the desired outcome. Intuition is derived from what one brings to mind, and consequently, the access to information is important for making relevant judgements. Therefore, when a departure from a present path of development is sought for, access to new information is likely to be required. Results from an experimental study, addressing affordability and concept generation, indicated that individuals were influenced, by the provision of selective information, to make more cost considerations and even to change approach when generating new concepts. It was further recognized that weak abilities to estimate costs in a lifecycle and capability perspective likely hampered low-cost ambitions. The findings from this study are suggested to contribute to theory on product development, and to support affordability when new products are developed.

  • 11.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Managing affordability in concept development of complex product systems (CoPS)2021In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study originates in a recognised unsustainable cost escalation for complex defence equipment. In order to understand how such cost escalation for complex product systems (CoPS) can be avoided, this study comparatively explores four different industrial sectors – energy, transportation, healthcare and defence – with and without intergenerational increasing costs, represented by four international companies. The results, collected from studying the development of one of each company’s products, reveal some characteristic differences in market factors between those sectors and companies having problems with intergenerational escalating costs and customer affordability, as compared to other sectors and companies. It is suggested that dependent on market characteristics, it might be necessary to actively manage affordability when CoPS are developed. Efforts made by the companies to make products more affordable were identified, and several factors enabling and disabling the development of less costly products without compromising customer needs were explored. Further, the implications of affordability management in a CoPS setting are elaborated on.

  • 12. Andersen, T. C. K.
    et al.
    Aagaard, A.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring business model innovation in SMEs in a digital context: Organizing search behaviours, experimentation and decision-making2022In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's business environment, digitalization plays a key role in establishing competitive advantage and developing new business models. However, little is known about business model innovation (BMI) processes and practices of small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs) in their digital venturing. Thus, the aim of this paper is to address this research gap by investigating the process activities of SMEs in effectively building new business models through digitalization. Through a case study of 18 SMEs, document studies and 36 interviews, we explore the BMI processes during the case companies' digital transformation. The research results identify four critical BMI process activities: (1) assessing the environment in search of new opportunities, (2) conveying a sense of urgency, (3) exploring and testing new opportunities through experimentation and (4) handling decision-making with a combination of intuition and data. Finally, our study reveals managerial implications related to data-driven decision-making during BMI, constituting four managerial dilemmas: (1) prognosis and scenario-driven search myopia, (2) timing and sustainability, (3) radical shift from traditional experimentation to data-based methods and (4) using intuition versus data-driven decision-making. 

  • 13. Andrén, L
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sjölander, S
    Opportunistic adaptation in start-up companies2003In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 3, no 5-6, p. 546-562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Boccardelli, P.
    Strategic and organizational insights into learning and innovation in hybrids and “new” organizations2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer, 2017, p. 1-10Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the concepts of hybrid and new organizations. Its intent is also to make clear the type of contribution the book is intended to bring to the literature on hybrid organizations. The structure of the book and how to navigate it, together with a short summary of contributions, are presented.

  • 15. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Giustiniano, L.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). LUISS School of Business and Management, Italy.
    The emergence of new organization designs. Evidences from self-managed team-based organizations2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 255-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New organization designs emerge continuously in highly dynamic innovation context to improve readiness to change. The adoption of self-managing teams operating cross-functionally on a bulk of products, together with the reduction of vertical layers in the organization, seems to be a common strategy for many organizations aiming to achieve higher level of efficacy and shorter lead times. Authors explore the extent to which new micro-and meso-level organizational forms contribute to the achievement of organizational efficiency, and produce secondary effects on long-term innovation goals.

  • 16. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Martini, A.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.). LUISS School of Business and Management, Italy.
    Investigating the impact of agile control mechanisms on learning in scrum teams2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 213-229Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter aims to explore Management Control Systems (MCS) resulting from the implementation of agile development methods, relying on an established MCS taxonomy. An abductive approach was adopted, considering the shortage of research evaluating the post-adoption effects of agile methods. Four organizations from an international telecommunication firm that implemented agile methods were involved, and 44 individual semi-structured interviews were performed. In addition, 121 free comments from a global survey to the same organizations were used as secondary data. The paper indicates how Scrum, a widespread agile method, implicitly brings multiple enforcing levers of control to a team’s self-regulatory learning processes.

  • 17.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Predicting team collective intention to innovate: An institutional perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Self-organizing coordination and control approaches: the impact of social interaction processes on self-regulated innovation activities in self-managing teams2017In: Innovation Management and Computing: Ecosystems and TechnologyIdea Generation and Content Model Processing / [ed] Cyrus Nourcan, Apple Academic Press, 2017, p. 37-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of social norms, as well as how and under which conditions social norms impact behavior, are determined by the social influence process. By leveraging the influence process we can create and handle change in self-managing teams in order to foster growth and steer team members in a positive direction, away from negative habits. At the same time, if poorly managed the developed social norms can inhibit change, and in the worst case result in conflict and resentment within the team.

    If team members feel part of a group and consider that group membership is relevant for them, they will adapt their behavior to align to the group's norms and standards, which in turn will dictate context-specific attitudes and behaviors that are appropriate for the team.

    This chapter focuses on teams’ social norms, distinguishing between descriptive- (what most others do) and injunctive (what most others approve or disapprove of) norms, investigating important moderators in the relationships between descriptive norms and behaviors, discussing the role of the social environment on the changes to and inculcation of injunctive social norms, and describing how individual team members' attributes refine the susceptibility of individuals to normative influences.

  • 19.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of self-managed teamsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    The interplay between the pre-existing managerial control systems and stakeholder's networks in self-managed team's identities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    Foss, Nicolai
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Interaction of Control Systems and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping the Identities of Self-Managed Teams2017In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 619-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team's commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: (1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; (2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and (3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyse multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 22.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    The interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of selfmanaged teams.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team’s commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: 1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; 2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and 3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying, and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyze multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso, and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 23.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J
    Martini, Antonella
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multilevel Framework for Organizational Learning in Self-Managed Team Organizations: an abductive micro-foundations studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the social cognitive learning perspective, this study advances a multilevel theory of organizational learning for team-based organizations, which integrates principles of cognition and motivation through team-level self-regulation mechanisms. We highlight and unpack these mechanisms, which have long been treated as black boxes in organizational learning research. We describe them using an empirical case from a multinational company, and we reveal their potential to affect motivation and socio-cognitive functions in self-managing teams. We also clarify the complexity of their relationships through a set of propositions and provide a definition of the team-level self-regulation mechanisms constructs.

  • 24.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Investigating the impact of agile methods on learning and innovation2013Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Peonia, Laura
    The dual control systems of agile teams: exploring knowledge management issues2014In: IFKAD 2014: 9th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 2014, p. 1907-1931Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to contribute to the exploration of micro-foundations for innovation in autonomous team-based firms. It describes how different types of management control systems influence the innovation performance of teams through an extensive field study of a large scale agile implementation. It reveals the moderating role played by different kinds of managerial control systems and by perceived time pressure on teams in the relationship between a team's absorptive capacity and its innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach - A total of 44 individual semi-structured interviews were used to collect data over three separate data collection stages conducted from August to November 2013. All data were triangulated with the qualitative content analysis results of free comments from 121 people, covering different agile roles in the same organizations as above, and embedded in a survey performed in August 2013. Due to the complexity of the topic and the lack of prior studies investigating the effect of agile implementation on team learning and innovation capabilities, an abductive research approach (Peirce, 1931) was selected as a suitable method. Originality/value - The empirical results indicate that a team's beliefs on the importance of learning strongly influence its self-regulated learning behaviours. They represent the configuration of AC meta-routines underlying the concept of absorptive capacity (Lewin et al., 2011) at the team-level, conducive to teams' exploration activities. Moreover, the antecedents for a team's exploitative and exploratory innovation activities are presented and two types of managerial controls for driving exploitative innovation activities are identified. Additionally, team-level absorptive capacity was analysed, since it is a less explored, but important construct, leading to a team's exploitative product innovation. Practical implications - This study's findings have a number of implications for practice. The results imply that autonomous team-based organizations may be better off not using one single standard control system to manage all their teams. In fact, beyond securing a team's access to knowledge, management needs to provide teams with differentiated means to develop necessary competencies and capacities for understanding, assimilating and using the knowledge they retrieve. In addition, management should influence a team's beliefs by valuing the tasks requiring innovation and transmitting sustainable values to teams through their mission and vision statements.

  • 26.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, S.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Breaking the iron cage: A multi-level perspective towards organizational control in post-bureaucratic structure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, Saeed
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multi-Level Study of Managerial Control Influence on Self-Managed Team Innovativeness2015In:  Academy of Management conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate organizational control systems as the underpinnings of large organizations’ ability to perform after transition to a flattened and decentralized structure. We consider horizontal social control mechanisms on team level (concertive control induced by high team identification) and vertical bureaucratic managerial control mechanisms on organization level (interactive and diagnostic management control systems), and examine their combined influence on the innovativeness of self-managing product development teams in a large company. We utilize a rich empirical data set including a multilevel multi-source survey of the members of 97 organizational teams, their internal team managers, and their higher-level managers. In contrast to some prior research findings, we find a negative effect of team’s concertive control on team’s innovativeness . In addition, managerial interactive control systems fostering a more prestigious team’s organizational image seem to strengthen the negative effect of concertive control on team’s innovativeness, while in combination with diagnostic control systems, legitimizing current external organizational team’s image, the effect of concertive control becomes positive. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that as team’s concertive control increases, managerial control systems show a converse relationship in such a way that the diagnostic control reduces and the interactive control increases the negative influence of concertive control.

  • 28.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Learning and innovation issues in agile teams: A case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more nuanced understanding of thebarriers that an agile/lean research and development (R&D) organization hasto overcome in order to be able to manage and apply knowledge effectively tobalance exploration and exploitation activities. It explores how people working in agile teams create, retain and transfer knowledge through theimplementation of a so-called Agile Scrum methodology. Our main findings arein the form of recommendations about the different innovation strategies firms should pursue. The links to the firm’s environmental conditions (such asorganizational culture, maturity, management practices) should allow thoseresults to be applied to other organizational contexts.We build on our understanding of the effects of agile/lean characteristics onorganizational learning and knowledge creation to propose ways to achievealignment within the firm at the operational level in order to facilitateambidextrous organizational learning through a case study of a software R&Dorganization. Data were collected from a questionnaire and interviews in aniterative process.

  • 29.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Agile implementation and organizational knowledge: Is there a problem?: An abductive framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Investigating the impact of agile control mechanisms on learning in scrum teams2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Appio, F. P.
    Social conduct, learning and innovation: An abductive study of the dark side of agile software development2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile methodologies have been adopted by an increasing number of organizations to improve their responsiveness. However, few studies have empirically analysed the effect of Agile on long-term organizational goals such as learning and innovation. Using an abductive approach, this study examines the relationships between self-regulated teams’ social conduct and their resulting learning and innovation. Results indicate that the perceived time pressure to get the job done greatly impedes team engagement in learning and innovation activities. Time pressure is affected by the various control strategies deriving from the implementation of Agile, which constitute its dark side: concertive, belief, diagnostic and boundary controls.

  • 32.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    School of Social Science, Business Management and Organization Group, Wageningen University and Research, Hollandseweg, 1, 6707 KN, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Marchegiani, Lucia
    Department of Business Studies, Roma Tre University, Via Silvio D’Amico, 77 00145 Roma, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Engineering Design, Integrated Product Development and Design.
    Roidis, Miltiadis
    Technology Entrepreneur, Tuinlaan 5C, 6703 HE, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Is technology neutral for MSEs? Interdependencies, information transparency and power imbalances in e-commerce ecosystems2023In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 91, no 3-4, p. 190-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the evident upsurge of e-commerce (EC) over the past decades, the peak of online demand caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the huge involvement of micro and small enterprises (MSEs) in the online businesses to survive, the extant literature has neglected to analyse how MSEs orchestrate their resources between internal and external investments. Past studies, also in the case of SMEs, have tended to adopt a more firm-centric perspective focusing on the organisational conditions that determine firms’ performance after the usage of EC, failing to explore the inter-organisational relations between MSEs and other actors in their ecosystem. Indeed, as MSEs may suffer from liability of smallness and lack of resources, they may rely more than other actors on the nexus of relations that emerge within the digital ecosystem generated through the usage of EC platforms. By relying on 37 interviews with owners or managers of MSEs operating in the food and beverage industry, we investigate the dynamics of resource distribution between MSEs and the other actors in the EC ecosystem. We identified the changes in interdependencies, the information asymmetries, and the power imbalances related to the interplay between MSEs and other actors within the EC ecosystem.

  • 33.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Knowing too much?: On bias due to domain-specific knowledge in internal crowdsourcing for explorative ideas2021In: R&D Management, ISSN 0033-6807, E-ISSN 1467-9310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal crowdsourcing utilizes a firm’s employees, of which many have a strong understanding of the domains in which the firm operates, for contributing with, developing and evaluating ideas. On the one hand, these employees can use their domain-specific knowledge to identify the value of what may seem a far-fetched solution to the average employee. On the other hand, previous research has shown that employees typically evaluate ideas in their domains less favorably if they do not align with ongoing exploitation activities. Hence, this study focuses on whether a higher degree of relevant domain-specific knowledge makes employees participating in internal crowdsourcing prefer exploitative solutions when evaluating ideas. An empirical study of an online platform for firm-internal innovation in a multinational engineering company showed that employees who only infrequently participated in internal crowdsourcing mostly contributed to and evaluated ideas within their own domain. Employees who frequently participated also contributed to and evaluated ideas outside their own domains. By statistically analyzing group differences during idea evaluation, we show that employees participating infrequently favor exploitable solutions, whereas employees participating frequently are more uncertain. The former difference is only seen concerning ideas that require domain-specific knowledge to understand, but the latter is observed for all types of ideas. This study makes three substantial contributions. First, employees with domain-specific knowledge, through their preference for exploitative solutions, bias the outcome of internal crowdsourcing when idea evaluation requires domain-specific knowledge. Second, this bias is aggravated by the overall higher level of uncertainty displayed by employees participating frequently in internal crowdsourcing and thereby tend to reach out to other domains. Third, in order to mitigate this, bias management can build engagement in internal crowdsourcing through idea challenges that do not require domain-specific knowledge and consider avoiding employees with a strongly associated domain knowledge for idea evaluation.

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  • 34.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Patrick, Adam J.
    Rolls-Royce plc.
    The genesis of public-private innovation ecosystems: Bias and challenges2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 162, article id 120378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of technology increasingly depends on innovation ecosystems and frequently involves actors from both industry and academia. However, value creation may experience challenges due to bias formed during public-private innovation ecosystem genesis.

    This empirical study of bias in a new pan-European public-private initiative provides results regarding innovation ecosystems and the individuals typically active during their genesis: value creation is biased towards the selection of incumbent firms and complement challenges, and participation is biased towards engineers with knowledge of exploitation from multiple domains and researchers with knowledge of exploitation from single domains.

    This suggests that the implications of the loose coupling emphasised by the innovation ecosystems discourse and the knowledge of the different contexts in which firms capture value are more complex than previously acknowledged. The practical implications are that the ability of public innovation ecosystem leadership to act early on novel technology might be offset by the inability of involved firms to commit to bringing the technology to market and that individuals typically active during public-private innovation ecosystems genesis are not ideal for handling this challenge. In fact, increasingly connected public leadership could smother the innovation ecosystem unless well-connected and multidisciplinary researchers are brought in as brokers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Vahlne, Tobias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Northvolt AB.
    Which skills? A critical perspective on the skills facilitating the transfer of third-cycle students to knowledge-intensive SMEs2022In: Proceedings of Frontiers in Education 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper relates to public-private innovation ecosystems. This loosely knit form of cooperation allows for beneficial activities such as knowledge transfer, dissemination of novel technology, and recruitment. In these contexts students graduating from third-cycle education should be able to find opportunities for transferring to knowledge-intensive positions in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    However, a 3-year study of the reasons why firms approach public organisations within a Europe-wide, public-private innovation ecosystem suggests that students might struggle to find such opportunities. Through a questionnaire provided to all firms approaching the ecosystem we identify recruitment as one of their lowest ranked interests. By interviewing members of the public organisations found in the ecosystem we identify how cooperation is initiated and maintained, and how this influences the opportunities for students to transfer into industry. The results provide nuance to the current emphasis in skill development within third-cycle (engineering) education. It is rarely recognized that fostering technical skill and academic entrepreneurship might not be enough to allow all types and sizes of firms to receive engineering students. 

    Particularly, this study identifies the academic and industrial boundary spanning roles at knowledge-intensive SMEs as important. These roles require a third-cycle education that early on hones skills that typically do not become critical until much later for students that pursue an academic path – e.g., the inter-organisational project management skills necessary to effectively seek research funding or to negotiate goal alignment between organisations. We argue that to allow third-cycle students to practice the finer points of such skills, universities need to evolve more distributed support structures for innovation that integrate in-depth engineering knowledge with innovation skills and have an increased focus on human and social capital.

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  • 36. Beretta, M.
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Moderating Ideation in Web-Enabled Ideation Systems2018In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 389-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While organizations increasingly implement web-enabled ideation systems to access the collective intelligence of their distributed employees, recent studies show that most attempts to use these systems underperform or fail. This article draws on a qualitative case study of the Ericsson system “Idea Boxes” to explore a novel approach to manage ideation based on the use of the moderator role. The aim of this study is to understand to what extent and how the introduction of moderators can contribute to a better management of web-enabled ideation systems and to overcome the shortcomings commonly associated with their use. The contribution of this study to innovation literature is threefold. First, it develops a conceptual framework that gives insights into the practices implemented by moderators to manage ideation, namely: (1) formulating an ideation strategy, (2) combining means for community building, and (3) formalizing the ideation process. It focuses on unfolding their key complementarities. Second, this study relates these practices to the shortcomings of web-enabled ideation systems with respect to the sourcing, filtering, and handling of employees' ideas. It discusses how the identified practices can help organizations address these shortcomings by stimulating sustained employee participation, increasing the quality and fit of the ideas generated, and ensuring their efficient selection and integration. Third, this article compares moderators to other innovation roles discussed in the new product development literature with the aim of broadening the future research agenda toward an investigation of emerging organizational roles having limited formal authority to manage innovation. The findings of this study provide valuable guidelines to managers to implement more sophisticated approaches for a better management of the ideation process through web-enabled ideation tools.

  • 37. Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sapucci, Mirco
    Making collaborative ideation work: Challenges and success factors for the use of collaborative ideation tools2012In: IAMOT 2012, Taiwan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Dagnino, Giovanni Battista
    Ferrigno, Giulio
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Coopetition and ideation performance: Observations from two complementary experimentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Combining collaboration and competition: a key to improved idea management?2014In: European Journal of International Management, ISSN 1751-6757, E-ISSN 1751-6765, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 528-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research in the field of idea management has highlighted both collaboration and competition driving ideation. While these two are normally considered opposing and excluding, recent work proposes them to be complements. Previous studies have primarily focused on firm-external communities, and little is known about the joint use of collaboration and competition inside firms. This paper addresses collaborative and competitive mechanisms used in firm-internal idea management. Case studies of three multinational firms active in idea management have been performed. The firms' use of collaboration and competition in firm-internal idea management is analysed, revealing that the two approaches can be combined, and explores how their paradoxical coexistence can be managed. This study underlines the importance of addressing intrinsic motivation and facilitating sharing of knowledge in order to bridge and align collaboration and competition mechanisms. It also highlights issues of rewards and company culture, requiring informed attention from human resources management.

  • 40.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. SCA Hygiene Products, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating Ideas for Innovation: Effects of Organizational Distance on Knowledge Creation Processes2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is to a large extent considered a social and communicative process, and input from other individuals potentially improves the generation of novel and valuable ideas also in the early stages of idea creation and development. Both colleagues inside organizations and external parties have frequently been proposed as important sources of information and knowledge within this part of the innovation process. Other contributions addressing social networks and innovation bring into focus the potentially negative effects that certain network structures may have on innovation, pointing to inconsistencies in received theory. In order to address these inconsistencies, an empirical study of ideation in a Swedish multinational firm was performed, taking into account two different knowledge creation processes - combination and in-depth analysis - and their inter-relationships with organizational distance between contributing individuals. Data was collected using a survey and was analysed using regression models. It was found that different levels of organizational distance correlate with different knowledge creation processes. In-depth analysis occurred more often with employees' close colleagues, whereas the combination of existing ideas and information was more frequent in interaction with employees' close colleagues and with external parties. Both these interaction patterns were also found to be positive for the generation of patents, whereas no such relationship could be seen when individuals interacted with colleagues in other departments in the same firm. The findings have implications for theory on cognitive distance, and also suggest that management needs to facilitate different types of collaboration and networking when aiming to facilitate and support ideation, taking into consideration the type of innovation aimed for, as well as its supporting knowledge creation processes.

  • 41.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation High Performers: A Study of Motivational Factors2015In: Creativity Research Journal, ISSN 1040-0419, E-ISSN 1532-6934, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As innovation today is one of the keys to success for firms, creativity among its employees becomes a key asset and the understanding about what motivates employees in ideation is consequently of high interest. This article addresses differences in motivation among high- and low performers in ideation and contributes to existing theory by enhancing the understanding about what characterizes motivation among ideation high performers. The quantitative analysis used is based on a study performed at a multinational consumer goods company based in Sweden, surveying employees’ performance, motivation and their preferences towards collaboration and competition. Among key findings is the possible combination of collaboration and competition mechanisms as motivating means in firms’ ideation management. 

  • 42.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing ideation collaboration through competition?2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 43. Berglund, H.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström, C.
    Towards a symmetric theory of disruptive innovation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Center for Business Innovation, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores ideation capabilities in large organizations. Based on the dynamic capabilities framework, it is seen that ideation capabilities are managerial and organizational processes for the stimulation, identification, selection and implementation of ideas. In order to explore how these capabilities are manifested and used in firms, case studies of four Swedish companies have been performed. The results of the study show that there are different approaches to ideation. In terms of the nature of innovative ideas, the observations lead to the suggestion that ideation presents some seemingly paradoxical issues to management. Firms with an explicit focus on building ideation practices experience that there are some negative consequences of the resultant formalization. Furthermore, the extent to which many employees should be involved in ideation is a difficult aspect, even though new technologies make this more viable. Also the degree to which the search for ideas should be directed is a non-trivial question, as the ideation processes can be facilitated by both freedom and limitations. It is nevertheless seen that firms can benefit from more deliberate approaches to ideation, in particular if these are broad and balanced and focus on both building capabilities that formalize the informal, in terms of establishing explicit processes, roles and systems, and building capabilities needed to manage informal structures in new ways.

  • 46.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    Ideation Potential of Internal Networks: Does Social Capital Matter?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Center for Business Innovation.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation: untapping the knowledge creation potential of internal networks2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are compared – the degree (i.e. the size) of an individual’s network of work relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Analyzing a database from a Swedish company which has worked systematically with idea management, and which today has a well-established information technology system that collects ideas from a large number of employees, this study presents evidence indicating that the larger is the size of an individual’s’ ego network – specifically the number of social interactions with other actors – the larger this individual’s innovative performance in terms of high quality ideas, whereas the larger is the number of structural holes in the ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual. Our findings support the conclusion that individuals’ relationships within firms play a key role for value-creating behavior, and thereby contribute to a deeper understanding of how social capital influences idea generation.

  • 48.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    Department of Economic Studies, Faculty of Economics, G. d'Annunzio University, Pescara, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, Daniele
    Department of Public Health, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 631-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are investigated—the degree (i.e. size) of individuals' networks of ideation relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Previous research has presented different and even conflicting empirical results concerning the effect of structural holes on innovation activities, and has not dealt specifically with the ideation phase of the innovation process. By drawing upon an idea database from a Swedish company that has worked systematically with idea management for an extensive period, this study investigates the interrelationship between social capital and ideation. The empirical study reveals that the larger the size of an individual's ego network, the higher is this individual's innovative performance in terms of high-quality ideas, whereas the larger the number of structural holes in an ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual in question. These findings support the conclusion that social capital, in terms of individuals' relationships with fellow employees within firms, has a positive influence on idea-generating behavior. Moreover, the results reveal that the presence of structural holes is negative for ideation performance, thus providing important new input to the recent debate on the interrelationship between structural holes and innovation in general.

  • 49.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovation: the need for collaborative demand-driven innovation2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Product Development Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    New Business Development and Innovation, Group Function Strategy, Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovations: introducing demand-driven collaborative ideation2014In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 5, no 4/5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Web-enabled tools for ideation are becoming increasingly diffused in companies, but their true impact on innovation performance has been questioned. A factor that can explain some of the so far missing performance of these firm-internal systems for ideation is a lack of attention to the demand-side of ideation. Frequently, the focus of ideation is put more or less unilaterally on the supply-side, with the aim to generate as many or as good ideas as possible, instead of focusing on innovation needs. The aim of this article is to describe and analyse demand-driven collaborative ideation, with a particular emphasis on its management aspects. In order to empirically investigate how to manage this new approach to ideation, a case study of Ericsson, a Swedish multi-national corporation, has been performed. The results highlight that incentives, visibility and resources are three main components of demand-driven collaborative ideation and outline key challenges with this new approach to ideation.

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