Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 175
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Infrastructure and Geomatic Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Franklin, Joel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Attrition and Fatigue in a Four Waves of Two-Week Travel Diary: A Case Study in Stockholm, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a four-wave panel survey design and implementation collected on individual level, consisting of three survey’s instrument namely, self-reported two-week travel diary, on-line psychological questionnaire, and self-reported mental map-related questions. The panel survey is built with the aim to examine individuals’ behavioural changes when a new tram extension line in western sub-urban areas of Stockholm, Sweden, was introduced in October 2013. The survey duration took approximately seven months’ period and the data collected covers all four different seasons of the year, which make it wealth of information. The analysis of attrition and fatigue was done on the two-week travel diary survey instrument only. It is found that the overall attrition rate is 34.3% of the total participants (102 individuals) in the Wave 1 survey, which is considered large. The attrition rate between consecutive waves, however, is considered low which is within the range of 7% to 10%. Based on the binary logit models, there are no systematic tendencies of the dropouts’ characteristics from wave to wave to be found, indicating attrition is purely random. There is no correlation between immobile days and missing trips per day are to be found between-waves. The results of the binary logit model on missing trip show that personal attributes, temporal factors (e.g. weekdays and waves) and travel characteristics (e.g. home-based trip, trip purpose, travel distance and number of inter-modal transfers) significantly affect the missing trip but no indication of fatigue appears.

  • 2.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Infrastructure and Geomatic Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Franklin, Joel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Subjective Factors Influencing Individual's Response to a New Public Transport ServiceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The timing and nature of people’s responses can be expected to vary when a new element enter their environment. For example, when an individual is provided with a new or modified transport service. This time-scale of behavioural responses will affect the patronage of, and short- and long-term demands on the new service over time. Understanding the underlying factors that influence an individual’s response over time to a new or modified transport service would enable us to identify trigger factors that make the new service attractive from an individual’s point of view. Chatterjee (2001) and Douglas (2003) argued that motives other than instrumental factors related to public transport use, such as attitudes, awareness, travel habits and learning processes, can influence individual responses over time to changes in the travel environment. Unfortunately, despite their importance, there have been few studies that examined this argument empirically. To address this research gap, this paper aims to investigate the influences of subjective factors on individuals’ responses to the introduction of a modified public transport (PT) service over time by proposing and testing an alternative model that modifies the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model framework. This paper also aims to investigate the behavioural change in terms of attitudes and perceptions on individuals’ resources and constraints in using a modified PT service over time after its introduction. The case study involves the new extension of a tram line connecting the suburbs of Alvik and Solna Centrum in Stockholm, Sweden. Four waves of a panel survey were conducted with 96 individuals who lived along the new service, from just before the new service was introduced and until seven months after its introduction. A structural equation modelling technique was used to estimate the relationships between behavioural constructs and panel data, then incorporate them into a discrete choice model. The results show that intention influences individual’s quick-response choice. The panel analysis shows that past behaviour in using the new service influenced current behaviour, and that perceived walking distance in using the service consistently influenced the frequency of using the new service over time.

  • 3.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of Infrastructure and Geomatic Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Franklin, Joel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Liu, Chengxi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics. VTI.
    Understanding Seasonal Variation in Individual's Activity Participation and Trip Generation by Using Four Consecutive Two-Week Travel DiaryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the interactions between travel demand, time allocation and mode choice in different seasons by jointly modeling the work and/or study, routine and leisure activity-travel engagements of 67 individuals in Stockholm, Sweden. A longitudinal panel two-week travel diary data collected in four consecutive waves over a span of seven months period that covers all four different seasons; autumn, winter, spring and summer, were analysed by using simultaneous Tobit models. The model was applied to explore the interactions among each activity-travel indicator, and individuals’ unique characteristics and endogeneity in activity-travel engagements between different seasons were also considered in the model system. The results of models reveal clear trade-offs between mandatory activities (work and/or study) and non-mandatory activities (routine and leisure), regardless of any seasons, although the magnitudes vary between seasons. There is also a positive mutual endogeneity relationship between number of trips and activity duration within the same activity type. The trade-offs between work and/or study trips towards routine and leisure trips are larger in winter and spring respectively, than in other seasons. It is also found that mode effects on travel time for conducting mandatory activity are much larger in spring than in other seasons. However, the effects of public transport and slow modes on travel time for leisure activities are much larger in summer than in other seasons.

  • 4.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Examining the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints on leisure activity participation in different seasons of the year2016In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using multi-day, multi-period travel diaries data of 56 days (four waves of two-week diaries) for 67 individuals in Stockholm, this study aims to examine the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints (e.g. teleworking, studying at home, doing the laundry, cleaning and taking care of other household member[s]) on individuals’ day-to-day leisure activity participation decisions in four different seasons. This study also aims to explore the effects of various types of working schedules (fixed, shift, partial- and full-flexible) on individuals’ decisions to participate in day-to-day leisure activities. A pooled model (56 days) and wave-specific models (14 days in each wave) are estimated by using dynamic ordered Probit models. The effects of various types of working schedules are estimated by using 28 days of two waves’ data. The results show that an individual’s leisure activity participation decision is significantly influenced by out-of-home work durations but not influenced by in-home constraints, regardless of any seasons. Individuals with shift working hours engage less in day-to-day leisure activities than other workers’ types in both spring and summer seasons. The thermal indicator significantly affects individuals’ leisure activity participation decisions during the autumn season. Individuals exhibit routine behaviour characterized by repeated decisions in participating in day-to-day leisure activities that can last up to 14 days, regardless of any seasons.

  • 5.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Observing dynamic behavioural responses due to the extension of a tram line by using panel survey2016In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 86, p. 78-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a four-wave panel survey of individuals' trips and psychological attributes collected among residents along a new tram line extension in the city of Stockholm, Sweden, this study aims to investigate factors that determine the individuals' learning and decision-making processes in using a new transport option. This includes investigating which group of travellers have used the new tram extension earlier than others, and integrated the tram extension as a part of their daily travel patterns. This paper also describes the design and construction of the four-wave panel data collection, which was collected from two weeks before and up to seven months after the opening of the new option. Descriptive analysis shows that within a seven-month period, 79% of the respondents tried the new tram extension but only 14.9% of them adopted the new option as their daily travel mode. During the observed period, about 49.3% of the respondents migrated between travel modes for non-discretionary trips. Further multivariate analysis shows that middle-income travellers and travellers who owned car(s) used the new tram extension earlier than others. The effect of past experience on the current use of the tram extension on a day-to-day basis was also examined by using a mixed logit model with panel data. The purpose of the model is to examine whether individuals' daily experiences with the new tram extension that result from repeated previous choices would affect their decisions to maintain using the new option in subsequent waves.

  • 6. Allström, A.
    et al.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. cVTI Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Smartphone based travel diary collection: Experiences from a field trial in Stockholm2017In: Emerging technologies and models for transport and mobility 44th European Transport Conference Selected Proceedings, Casa Convalescència, Barcelona, Spain, 5-7 October 2016, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 26, p. 32-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, there is a great need for new methods to collect travel data. Traditional methods have considerable drawbacks and, at the same time, the models used to analyse the transport system require more and more detailed and high-quality data. An alternative method that stands out as very promising is to capture raw data from devices that can use any positioning technology (e.g., GPS, WiFi positioning, GSM, etc.), followed by transforming the raw data into meaningful travel data. Since most smartphones are equipped with various sensors that can be used to determine the location of the smartphone, and since smartphones are integrated in the daily life of most people, they provide an unprecedented opportunity for large-scale travel data collection. This method has a great potential to solve the problems related to the estimation of distance/travel time, geographic coding of departure/destination locations and forgotten trips and it will also provide a more detailed and extensive data set. In a recently completed research project the feasibility of replacing or complementing the traditional travel diary, with a suite of tools that make use of smartphone collected travel data has been evaluated. The advantages and disadvantages of the traditional method and the proposed method were studied. For a fair comparison, both methods have been tested in the same city, at the same time, and with the same respondents. To achieve the objectives of the project, MEILI, a system that consists of a smartphone application for capturing the movement of users and a web application for allowing the users to annotate their movement, has been deployed. The recruitment of respondents is a critical phase for traditional travel diaries and, as expected, this was the case also for the smartphone based method. A lesson learnt was that it is important to simplify the registration process as much as possible. In total 2142 trips were collected and annotated by 171 users. 51 of the users annotated trips covering more than a week. The experiences from the field trial shows that a smartphone based travel diary collection is a very useful complement to traditional travel diary collection methods since it appeals to a different age group and collects more detailed travel data for a longer period. The main findings of the paper are that smartphone based data collection is feasible, that the algorithms to save battery work well and that trips of the same respondent vary considerably depending on day of the week.

  • 7. Ames, Alicia
    et al.
    Mateo-Babiano, Iderlina B.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport planning, economics and engineering.
    Transport Workers' Perspective on Indigenous Transport and Climate Change Adaptation2014In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2451, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the potential role of indigenous transport for increasing the adaptive capacity of selected cities in developing Asia. Indigenous transport drivers were surveyed face-to-face in Bandung, Indonesia, and in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, to gain an understanding of how transport workers, specifically drivers-operators, characterize transport modes considered as indigenous and perceive their potential role in increasing the adaptive capacity of these cities. The main finding was that indigenous transport modes in the two cities in the case study had evolved to fit a niche market influenced by differing urban scales and divergent demographic and geographic characteristics. Thus, the experiences and the perceptions of transport workers on indigenous transport were highly contextualized in relation to service and route characteristics. Operating conditions for drivers were indicative of the regulatory status of indigenous transport modes in the informal landscape. This analysis contributes to an increased understanding of the role and the operation of indigenous transport modes within the transport system. The analysis also contributes policy-relevant insights to improve an understanding of the potential role of indigenous transport in climate change adaptation, as well as to increase awareness and to anticipate a shift to a more environmentally sustainable transport mode.

  • 8. Anable, Jillian
    et al.
    Schuitema, Geertje
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of theWest of England.
    Aditjandra, Paulus
    Beecroft, Mark
    Walking and cycling and socio-economic status in Scotland: analysis of statistical data and rapid review of the literature2010Report (Other academic)
  • 9. Andrews, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Parkhurst, Graham
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of the West of England.
    Shaw, Jon
    ‘The Grey Escape’: How and why are older people using their free bus passes?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Andrews, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Parkhurst, Graham
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Shaw, Jon
    The Grey Escape: investigating older people's use of the free bus pass2012In: Transportation planning and technology (Print), ISSN 0308-1060, E-ISSN 1029-0354, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2008 most older people in England have benefited from unlimited area-wide free travel by bus after the morning peak period. The official policy rhetoric supporting implementation of the measure drew significantly on the need to reduce social exclusion amongst older people. However, despite a substantial increase in the number of concessionary journeys in England and the associated cost liabilities for local authorities and possibly also operators, there is currently only limited understanding of the wide ranging effects on bus use of providing a free pass, and in particular to whom benefits from the policy accrue. In part, this circumstance results from a methodological focus by evaluation studies hitherto that has emphasised aggregate-level data, often at the expense of the very rich contextual information about how the individual benefits from using a pass. This article presents insights into the perceptions, motivations and decisions relating to use of free bus passes, highlighting the existence of both tangible and intangible benefits which arise. It offers a fresh insight into previously undefined uses and benefits derived from possessing and using a concessionary bus pass. This article concludes by noting possible policy implications of the research in the context of the UK's ageing population and for other international contexts where the transport intervention of free bus travel is being considered.

  • 11. Andrews, Geoffrey
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Parkhurst, Graham
    Shaw, Jon
    Exploring Impact of Zero-Fare Transportation Policies on Demand for Bus Travel by the Elderly2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2008, older people in England have been provided with nationwide zero-fare travel by bus as part of the Government’s wider social inclusion agenda. In common with other international zero-fare transportation measures, the scheme has stimulated a substantial increase in demand for bus travel, yet relatively little is known about how pass holders are using their passes. This is characterised by a lack of in-depth statistical analyses of pass holders’ usage trends. Through analysis of an on-board bus survey of 487 pass holders conducted in Southwest England, this paper explores the relationship between pass holders’ characteristics and their propensity to increase their travel by bus, and ultimately report an improvement in their quality of life as a result of the policy. The results confirm that the pass is mainly being used for shopping and social reasons, with evidence that the zero-fare pass has led to some modal substitution from the car, but also has facilitated trips that would not have taken place in the absence of the scheme. Multivariate analysis reveals that those pass holders who are older (75+), would have travelled as a car passenger, or used the bus anyway in the absence of a pass, are the ones least likely to report increased bus use since obtaining a pass. Interestingly, two of these variables (being older, and being a car passenger in the absence of a pass) simultaneously increase pass holders’ propensity to report an improvement in their quality of life, leading to the conclusion that zero-fare policy has the potential to improve quality of later life above and beyond changes in pass holder bus trip frequency. In other words, the traditionally assumed link between increase in bus trips and derived benefit is not supported in all cases by this research.

  • 12. Avineri, Erel
    et al.
    Shinar, David
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
    Pedestrians' behaviour in cross walks: The effects of fear of falling and age2012In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 30-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedestrians are exposed to risks when crossing roads in urban areas. The crossing behaviour of pedestrians was studied as a factor contributing to their exposure to risks on the road and to their involvement in road accidents. This work explores two specific aspects of crossing behaviour: crossing speed and head pitches the proportion of time pedestrians point their heads down (rather than towards the traffic) when crossing a road. The last one is used as an indicator of the (lack of) attention to cross-traffic. We also explored the possible effect of fear of falling (FOF) among pedestrians, as it might be associated with slow walking, less attention to cross traffic, and more attention to the pavement and their footsteps. This paper reports on a field study that combined an observatory technique with short survey. 203 pedestrians in two sites (signalised and unsignalised crosswalks) were video recorded while crossing the road. The FOF of pedestrians and other measures of pedestrian behaviour at crosswalks were revealed by means of questionnaire. Age and gender had the most significant effects on crossing speed, and FOF had a significant effect on the proportion of downward head pitches during crossing.

  • 13. Avineri, Erel
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of the West of England.
    The effect of household size and structure on travel/activity patterns: exploration of household travel time budget2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14. Avineri, Erel
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of the West of England.
    The effect of household size on travel/activity patterns: Exploration of household travel time budget2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Bayarma, Alexander
    et al.
    Kitamura, Ryuichi
    Susilo, Yusak
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    On the recurrence of daily travel patterns: A stochastic-process approach to multi-day travel behavior2007In: 86th Annual Meeting of Transportation Research Board (TRB), 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Bayarma, Alexander
    et al.
    Kitamura, Ryuichi
    Susilo, Yusak
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    On the recurrence of daily travel patterns: A stochastic-process approach to multi-day travel behavior2007In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, Vol. 2021, p. 55-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiday travel behavior was examined as a stochastic process, and new empirical findings are offered on the variation of travel patterns from day to day. The analysis was based on data from a 6-week travel diary survey conducted in Germany. A small number of travel pattern classes were identified, and transitions in the patterns over a course of weeks were analyzed with Markov chain models. Transitions from a pattern to itself are frequent, particularly for nonworkers, and indicate that some patterns tend to be pursued for a large number of consecutive days. The study also reveals that individuals are heterogeneous in terms of multiday travel behavior; pattern-to-pattern transition probabilities vary substantially across individuals. Some of the observable heterogeneity is demonstrated in terms of the association between attributes of the individual and the recurrence of daily travel patterns.

  • 17. Carmichael, Serena
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    University of the West of England.
    An exploration of the natural barrier impacts to the individual travel mode choice2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Cats, Oded
    et al.
    Delft University, Netherlands.
    Abenoza, Roberto
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Liu, Chengxi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Evolution of Satisfaction with Public Transport and Its Determinants in Sweden Identifying Priority Areas2015In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2538, p. 86-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring and analysing satisfaction with public transport services facilitates service performance monitoring, market analysis, benchmarking and the identification of priority areas. The systematic and regular collection of information concerning satisfaction enables to investigate how passengers’ satisfaction as well as its determinants changes over time. These changes may be driven by changes in service quality or shifts in passengers’ expectations and preferences. This study analyses how satisfaction with public transport and its determinants evolved over time in Sweden in the years 2001-2013. The determinants of satisfaction are identified based on a factor analysis and the estimation of multivariate satisfaction models. The superposition of our findings culminates in a dynamic passenger satisfaction priority map which allows identifying priority areas based on observed trends in satisfaction with service attributes and their respective importance. The deterioration of overall satisfaction with public transport in Sweden in recent years is driven by a decrease in satisfaction with customer interface and length of trip time. These two service aspects as well as operation were found key determinants of overall satisfaction which users consistently rate among the least satisfactory. The results of this study are instrumental in supporting service providers in designing measures that will foster satisfaction in the future.

  • 19.
    Cats, Oded
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Reimal, Triin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Public Transport Pricing Policy Empirical Evidence from a Fare-Free Scheme in Tallinn, Estonia2014In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2415, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities worldwide are looking for new policies to attract travelers to shift from cars to public transport. Policies focused on reducing public transport fares are aimed at improving social inclusion and leading to a modal shift. The City of Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, has recently introduced a fare-free public transport (FFPT) service in an effort to improve accessibility and mobility for its residents. The case of Tallinn is a full-scale, real-world experiment that provides a unique opportunity for investigating the impacts of FFPT policy. A macrolevel empirical evaluation of FFPT impacts on service performance, passenger demand, and accessibility for various groups of travelers is presented. In contrast to previous studies, the influence of FFPT on passenger demand was estimated while changes in supply were controlled. The results indicate that the FFPT measure accounts for an increase of 1.2% in passenger demand, with the remaining increase attributed to an extended network of public transport priority lanes and increased service frequency. The relatively small effect could be attributed to the previous price level and public transport share as well as analysis of the short-term impact. The evidence-based policy evaluation in this paper is instrumental in supporting policy making and facilitating the design of public transport pricing strategies.

  • 20.
    Cats, Oded
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Impacts of free public transport: evaluation framework2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Cats, Oded
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Reimal, T.
    The prospects of fare-free public transport: evidence from Tallinn2016In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subsidy level of public transport systems varies considerably among systems worldwide. While limited-scale free-fare public transport (FFPT) services such as limited campaigns and fare evasion for special groups or specific services are prevalent, there is only limited evidence on the consequences of introducing a full-fledged FFPT. The case of Tallinn, Estonia offers a full-scale experiment that provides a unique opportunity to investigate the impacts of FFPT. This study examines travel pattern changes based on individual travel habit survey shortly before and almost 1 year after the introduction of FFPT policy in Tallinn based on interviews and travel diaries of a random sample of 1500 household. We analyse modal shift effects and whether they are driven by trip generation or trip substitution, travel attitudes and satisfactions as well as impacts on equity, employment prospects, and trip destination choices. Almost a year after the introduction of FFPT, public transport usage increased by 14 % and there is evidence that the mobility of low-income residents has improved. The effect of FFPT on ridership is substantially lower than those reported in previous studies due to the good level of service provision, high public transport usage and low public transport fees that existed already prior to the FFPT.

  • 22. Chen, C.
    et al.
    Ma, J.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Liu, Y.
    Wang, M.
    The promises of big data and small data for travel behavior (aka human mobility) analysis2016In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 68, p. 285-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decade has witnessed very active development in two broad, but separate fields, both involving understanding and modeling of how individuals move in time and space (hereafter called "travel behavior analysis" or "human mobility analysis"). One field comprises transportation researchers who have been working in the field for decades and the other involves new comers from a wide range of disciplines, but primarily computer scientists and physicists. Researchers in these two fields work with different datasets, apply different methodologies, and answer different but overlapping questions. It is our view that there is much, hidden synergy between the two fields that needs to be brought out. It is thus the purpose of this paper to introduce datasets, concepts, knowledge and methods used in these two fields, and most importantly raise cross-discipline ideas for conversations and collaborations between the two. It is our hope that this paper will stimulate many future cross-cutting studies that involve researchers from both fields.

  • 23.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Teknikringen 10, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sun, Y.
    Chen, Y.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    The effect of residential housing policy on car ownership and trip chaining behaviour in Hangzhou, China2018In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 62, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China has recently initialised affordable housing policies to provide low rent housings for medium and low income households aiming to satisfy the growing demand in the housing market. The travel behaviour of residents in these two different types of housing is likely to differ, since public housing tenants have a limited choice of residential location, as the location of low-rent housing is fixed, while residents in commodity housing are able to take their travel patterns into account in choosing their housing location. Therefore, this paper investigates the differences in car ownership and trip chaining behaviour arising from living in different types of residential housing. The self-selection bias caused by the differences in the observed individual and household characteristics is partially controlled by a propensity score matching approach. The study further considers the endogenous effect of car ownership on travel chaining behaviour, thus controlling for the self-selection bias at car ownership level. The results show that residents in private commodity housing are more likely to own a car than those in low-rent housing with similar individual and household characteristics. Different life cycle stages play a vital role in car ownership after self-selection in residential housing has been taken into account. Living in private commodity housing has a direct negative effect on trip chaining complexity, after controlling for endogenous car ownership, although this effect is offset by the tendency for private commodity housing owners to do complex trip chaining because they have one or more cars.

  • 24.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Anders, Karlström
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Estimating changes in transport CO2 emissions due to changes in weather and climate in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a considerable body of studies on the relationship between daily transport activities and CO2 emissions. However, how these emissions vary in different weather conditions within and between the seasons of the year is largely unknown. Because individual activity–travel patterns are not static but vary in different weather conditions, it is immensely important to understand how CO2 emissions vary due to the change of weather. Using Swedish National Travel Survey data, with emission factors calculated through the European emission factor model ARTEMIS, this study is a first attempt to derive the amount of CO2 emission changes subject to the change of weather conditions. A series of econometric models was used to model travel behaviour variables that are crucial for influencing individual CO2 emissions. The marginal effects of weather variables on travel behaviour variables were derived. The results show an increase of individual CO2 emissions in a warmer climate and in more extreme temperature conditions, whereas increasing precipitation amounts and snow depths show limited effects on individual CO2 emissions. It is worth noting that the change in CO2 emissions in the scenario of a warmer climate and a more extreme temperature tends to be greater than the sum of changes in CO2 emissions in each individual scenario. Given that a warmer climate and more extreme weather could co-occur more frequently in the future, this result suggests even greater individual CO2 emissions than expected in such a future climate.

  • 25.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Anders, Karlström
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Weather Variability and Travel Behaviour - What Do We Know and What Do We Not KnowManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that severe weather conditions is becoming more and more frequent, understanding the roles of weathers in influencing individual’s daily activity-travel pattern is important. Whilst some of previously rare events, such as heavy rain, unpredictable snow, higher temperature, less clear differences between seasons etc., would become more common, it is still largely unknown how individual would change and adapt their travel pattern in future climate conditions. Because of this concern, the number of researches on weather and travel behaviour has been increased dramatically in the recent decades. Most of those empirical evidences, however, have not been adopted in cost-benefit analysis (CBA), which serves as the main tool for policy evaluation and project selection by stakeholders. This study summarizes the existing findings in relations between weather variability and travel behaviour, and critically assesses the methodological issues in those studies. Several further research directions are identified and suggested for bridging the gap between empirical evidence and current practice in CBA.

  • 26.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Estimating changes in transport CO2 emissions due to changes in weather and climate in Sweden2016In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 49, p. 172-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a considerable body of studies on the relationship between daily transport activities and CO2 emissions. However, how these emissions vary in different weather conditions within and between the seasons of the year is largely unknown. Because individual activity–travel patterns are not static but vary in different weather conditions, it is immensely important to understand how CO2 emissions vary due to the change of weather. Using Swedish National Travel Survey data, with emission factors calculated through the European emission factor model ARTEMIS, this study is a first attempt to derive the amount of CO2 emission changes subject to the change of weather conditions. A series of econometric models was used to model travel behaviour variables that are crucial for influencing individual CO2 emissions. The marginal effects of weather variables on travel behaviour variables were derived. The results show an increase of individual CO2 emissions in a warmer climate and in more extreme temperature conditions, whereas increasing precipitation amounts and snow depths show limited effects on individual CO2 emissions. It is worth noting that the change in CO2 emissions in the scenario of a warmer climate and a more extreme temperature tends to be greater than the sum of changes in CO2 emissions in each individual scenario. Given that a warmer climate and more extreme weather could co-occur more frequently in the future, this result suggests even greater individual CO2 emissions than expected in such a future climate.

  • 27.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Jointly modelling individual’s daily activity-travel time use andmode share by a nested multivariate Tobit model system2015In: Transportation Research Procedia: 21st International Symposium on Transportation and Traffic Theory, Elsevier, 2015, Vol. 9, p. 71-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding mechanisms underlie the individual’s daily time allocations is very important to understand the variability ofindividual’s time-space constraints and to forecast his/her daily activity participation. At most of previous studies, activity timeallocation was viewed as allocating a continuous quantity (daily time budget) into multiple discrete alternatives (i.e. variousactivities and trips to engage with). However, few researches considered the influence of travel time that needs to be spent onreaching the activity location. Moreover, travel time itself is influenced by individuals’ mode choice. This can lead to an over- orunder-estimation of particular activity time location. In order to explicitly include the individual’s travel time and mode choiceconsiderations in activity time allocation modelling, in this study, a nested multivariate Tobit model is proposed. This proposedmodel can handle: 1. Corner solution problem (i.e. the present of substantial amount of zero observations); 2. Time allocationtrade-offs among different types of activities (which tends to be ignored in previous studies); 3. Travel is treated as a deriveddemand of activity participation (i.e. travel time and mode share are automatically censored, and are not estimated, ifcorresponding activity duration is censored). The model is applied on a combined dataset of Swedish national travel survey(NTS) and SMHI (Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute) weather record. Individuals’ work and non-work activitydurations, travel time and mode shares are jointly modelled as dependent variables. The influences of time-locationcharacteristics, individual and household socio demographics and weather characteristics on each dependent variable areexamined. The estimation results show a strong work and non-work activity time trade-offs due to the individual’s time-spaceconstraints. Evidences on a potential positive utility of travel time added on non-work activity time allocation in the Swedish case,are also found. Meanwhile, the results also show a consistent mode choice preference for a given individual. The estimatednested multivariate Tobit model provides a superior prediction, in terms of the deviation of the predicted value against the actualvalue conditional on the correct prediction regarding censored and non-censored, compared to mutually independent Tobitmodels. However, the nested multivariate Tobit model does not necessarily have a better prediction for model componentsregarding non-work related activities.

  • 28.
    Chengxi, Liu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Nursitihazlin, Ahmad Termida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Subjective perception towards uncertainty on weather conditions and its impact on out-of-home leisure activity participation decisionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Weather is fundamentally a ‘subjective’ perception rather than an objective measure that affects individual’s everyday travel decisions. This study uses data from a four-wave travel diary survey and aims to answer two research questions, i.e. 1. How individuals from different socio-demographic groups perceive weather. 2. How subjective weather perceptions affect individuals’ leisure activity participation decisions. Subjective weather perception and leisure activity participation are modelled in panel static/dynamic ordered Probit models. The results show that the reference thermal environment in general corresponds to the historical mean of the thermal environment. The effects of objective weather measures on subjective weather perception vary substantially between individuals. Moreover, the effect of subjective weather perception on leisure activity participation is non-linear and asymmetric. Only “very bad weather” and “very good weather” significantly influence the leisure activity participation. The effect of “very bad weather” also varies significantly between individuals. The intra-individual heterogeneity in the effect of “very good weather” has a smaller magnitude than that in the effect of “very bad weather”.

  • 29.
    Dharmowijoyo, Bayu Endrayana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak O
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Adiredja, L. S.
    Collecting a multi-dimensional three-weeks household time-use and activity diary in the Bandung Metropolitan Area, Indonesia2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 80, p. 231-246, article id 1641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a comprehensive panel data collection and analysis at household level, including detailed travel behaviour variables and comprehensive in-home and out-of-home activities, individual cognitive habits and affective behaviours, the rate of physical activity, as well as health related quality of life (QoL) information in the Bandung Metropolitan Area (BMA) of Indonesia. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to collect an individual's activity diary over an extended period as it captures the multi-tasking activities and multidisciplinary factors that underlie individual activity-travel patterns in a developing country. Preliminary analyses of the collected data indicate that different beliefs, anticipated emotions, support and attachment to motorised modes significantly correlate with different groups of occupation, gender, age, activity participation, multi-tasking activities, and physical health, but not with different social and mental health. This finding highlights the reason why implementing car reduction policies in Indonesia, without breaking or changing the individual's habits and influencing his/her attitudes have not been fruitful. The results also show that endorsing more physical activities may result in a significant reduction in the individual's motorised mode use, whilst individuals who demonstrate a tendency to use their spare time on social activities tend to have better social health conditions. Furthermore, undertaking multi-tasking out-of-home discretionary activities positively correlates with better physical health. All these highlight the importance of properly understanding and analysing the complex mechanisms that underlie these fundamental factors that shape individual daily activity-travel patterns in developing countries. This type of multidisciplinary approach is needed to design better transport policies that will not only promote better transport conditions, but also a healthier society with a better quality of life.

  • 30. Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Relationships among discretionary activity duration, its travel time spent and activity space indices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area, Indonesia2016In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 54, p. 148-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interdependencies among an individual's time allocation for different activities and the travel time spent on a given day, socio-demographic and built environment variables on these in-home and out of-home discretionary activities time duration, and how interaction of those variables on discretionary activities time duration influences an individual's activity space indices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area (JMA), Indonesia. The 3SLS model and the 2004 SITRAMP household travel survey were used to achieve this objective. The results show that the time allocation for certain discretionary activities significantly influences the time allocation for other discretionary activities. Workers, students and non-workers have different complex mechanisms pertaining to how they allocate time across different activities and journeys. This unique trade-off mechanism gives an individual a unique distribution of activity locations and spatial movement patterns. This is observed via his/her activity space indices throughout time and space. For example, the estimation result shows that workers' and students' time-use allocation, activities participation and activity space indices are highly influenced by their engagement in mandatory activities. However, this is not the case for non-workers. Furthermore, the mandatory travel time variable has a stronger impact on an individual's discretionary activities time-use pattern than the duration of mandatory activities. This may lead to the argument that, in order to provide more opportunities and flexibilities among the JMA's workers and students for undertaking discretionary activities, travel time reduction policies can play more significant role in shaping the discretionary activity-travel patterns than reduction in working/school hour policies. Additionally, in-line with previous findings in developed countries, locating grocery shops closer to residential areas in the CBD and in suburban areas creates more opportunities for workers and students to spend more time on out-of-home maintenance activities; with a shorter travel time, especially on. Fridays.

  • 31.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Analysing the complexity of day-to-day individuals’ activity-travel pattern using Multi-dimensional Sequence Alignment Method: A case study in Bandung Metropolitan Area, IndonesiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Day-to-day interpersonal and intrapersonal variability of individuals' activity spaces in a developing country2014In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1063-1076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the SITRAMP dataset, which was collected in the Jakarta metropolitan area, Indonesia, over four consecutive days, this study examines day-to-day variability of individuals' activity spaces. The impact of individual heterogeneity and variability of transport network conditions on day-to-day variability of activity spaces is also investigated. Results show that individuals' activity spaces vary from day to day and between different individuals. The activity space of other household members was found to be the most significant factor influencing an individual's activity space. Against the common belief in developing countries that better traffic conditions make individuals travel farther, results show that higher road-network travel speed and better road surface conditions within the home zones actually encourage individuals to visit a more compact set of activity locations and/or visit fewer activity locations. Smoother road surface conditions and higher travel speeds within home zones also bring the centroid of activity locations closer to individuals' home locations. Furthermore, day-to-day variability analysis of individual activity spaces showed that weekday activity spaces are more compact than those at weekends. Moreover, it was found that students' activity spaces show most variability, while those of nonworkers have the lowest variability.

  • 33.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Day-to-day variability in travellers' activity-travel patterns in the Jakarta metropolitan area2016In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 601-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using four consecutive days of SITRAMP 2004 data from the Jakarta metropolitan area (JMA), Indonesia, this study examines the interactions between individuals’ activity-travel parameters, given the variability in their daily constraints, resources, land use and road network conditions. While there have been a significant number of studies into day-to-day variability in travel behaviour in developed countries, this issue is rarely examined in developing countries. The results show that some activity-travel parameter interactions are similar to those produced by travellers from developed countries, while others differ. Household and individual characteristics are the most significant variables influencing the interactions between activity-travel parameters. Different groups of travellers exhibit different trade-off mechanisms. Further analyses of the stability of activity-travel patterns across different days are also provided. Daily commuting time and regular work and study commitments heavily shape workers’ and students’ flexibility in arranging their travel time and out-of-home time budget, leading to more stable daily activity-travel patterns than non-workers.

  • 34.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    On complexity and variability of individuals’ day-to-day discretionary activitiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35. Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    On complexity and variability of individuals' discretionary activities2018In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 177-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a hierarchical structured equation model and a multi-dimensional 3-week household time-use and activity diary conducted in Bandung Metropolitan Area, Indonesia, this study investigated the interaction among individuals' non-instrumental variables, time space (such as their day-to-day time duration of activity participation, socio-demographics and built environment), and health factors on individuals' day-to-day discretionary activities. The results show that individuals' subjective characteristics and day-to-day time-space components significantly influence decision making processes to participate in certain activities, particularly grocery shopping. Integration between subjective factors and day-to-day time duration of activity participation also reveals how an individual categorises a particular behaviour as routine, planned or impulsive. For example, grocery shopping is a planned behaviour with real consequences (e.g. starving). Appearing as a strong commitment and intention enables individuals to allocate time to engage in this activity. Thus, given the individual's time-space constraints, there may be a regular trade-off between frequency and duration. On the other hand, out-of-home social-recreational activity is a less urgent/impulsive activity and depends far more on an individual's day-to-day time-space constraints than his/her subjective characteristics. If the situation on the given day is not feasible for him/her to undertake the out-of-home social recreational activity, he/she is more likely to re-schedule the activity. The study results also show that land use configuration and perceived accessibilities influence individuals' discretionary activity participation.

  • 36.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Relationships among discretionary activity duration, travel time spent and activity space indices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area, IndonesiaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    The Day to Day Inter and Intra Personal Variability of Individual's Action Space in Developing CountryIn: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    The Day to Day Variability of Traveller's Activity Travel Pattern in The Jakarta Metropolitan Area2012In: TRB 93rd Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers, TRB , 2012, , p. 24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using four consecutive days of SITRAMP Data (2004) from the Jakarta Metropolitan Area (JMA), this study examines the interactions between individuals’ activity-travel pattern variables in the context of their daily constraints, resources and external opportunities. The results from our simultaneous equation modeling show that the observed individual’s activity-travel patterns are the result of the complex interactions between each individual’s activity-travel parameters, which vary from day to day. Some of the interactions are similar with the patterns produced by travelers from developed countries, while others are different. Household and individual characteristics are the most significant variables influencing the interactions among individual activity-travel patterns. Different groups of travelers have different trade-off mechanisms. Further analyses on the stability of the activity-travel patterns across different days are provided. Daily commuting time and regular work commitments heavily shape workers’ and students’ flexibility in arranging their travel time and out-of-home time budget, leading them to more stable daily activity-travel patterns than non-workers. The model also shows that highly unpredictable traffic significantly influences workers’ and students’ intra-personal variability in travel time, more so than any other variable.

  • 39. Ettema, Dick
    et al.
    Fernandez Abenoza, Roberto
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Octavius Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Satisfaction with intermodal trips in Stockholm: How do service attributes influence satisfaction with the main mode and with the journey as a whole?2016In: TRB 95th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers, 2016, Vol. 16, article id 2247Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Using door-to-door travel satisfaction data which was collected in Stockholm, Sweden, in this paper the authors have investigated how satisfaction with the main mode is related to the overall trip satisfaction, and how service related variables influence satisfaction at both levels. The results show that every stages within the journey matters in influencing traveler’s door-to-door journey experience. Some other factors, such as occurrence of disruptions, were also found as significant factor influencing the reported travel satisfaction. The quality of vehicle design, one of the traditional emphases in improving passenger’ travel satisfaction, affects the trip as a whole but not the main mode satisfaction. This indicates that this variable is more relevant for the access and egress trips made by addition means of public transport. Overall, the authors' findings suggest that in order to improve the overall trip satisfaction, it does not suffice to focus only on characteristics of the main mode, but also the quality of egress and access trips and also the quality of the interchanges as a whole.

  • 40.
    Fernandez Abenoza, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. TU Delft.
    Octavius Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    How does travel satisfaction sum up?: Decomposing the door-to-door experience for multimodal tripsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how satisfaction with individual trip legs aggregates to the overall travel experience for different types of trips will enable the identification of the trip legs that are most impactful. For this purpose we analyze data on retrospective evaluations of entire multi-modal trip experiences and satisfaction with individual trip legs. We formulate and describe alternative aggregation rules and underpin them in theory and previous empirical findings. The results of a series of regression models show that for a large number of multi-modal trip configurations normative rules can better reproduce overall travel satisfaction than heuristic rules. This indicates that all trip legs need to be considered when evaluating the overall travel experience, especially for trips legs involving waiting and/or transferring time. In particular, weighting satisfaction with individual trip legs with perceived trip leg durations yielded the best predictor of overall travel satisfaction. No evidence for a disproportional effect of the last or most exceptional part of the trip was found. This research contributes to the literature on combining multi-episodic experiences and provides novel empirical evidence in the transport domain. 

  • 41.
    Fernandez Abenoza, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Susilo, Yusak Octavius
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Travel satisfaction with public transport: Determinants, user classes, regional disparities and their evolution2017In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 95, p. 64-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing public transport ridership while providing a service that better caters to individual travelers poses an important goal and challenge for society, particularly public transport authorities and operators. This study identifies and characterizes current and potential users of public transport in Sweden and identifies the most important determinants of travel satisfaction with Public Transport services for each segment of travelers. In addition, it investigates the changes over time of attribute importance among the different segments and the inter-segment geographical variation of overall satisfaction. The analysis is based on a dataset of almost half a million records. Travelers were clustered based on their socio-demographics, travel patterns and accessibility measures to enable the analysis of determinants of satisfaction for different market segments. The cluster analysis results with five segments of Swedish travelers include: (i) inactive travelers; (ii) long distance commuters; (iii) urban motorist commuters; (iv) rural motorist commuters and;(v) students. By contrasting satisfaction with the importance of each quality of service attribute, three key attributes that should be prioritized by stakeholders are identified: customer interface, operation, network and  length  of  trip time. Interestingly, the results suggest an overall similarity in the importance of service attributes among traveler segments. Nevertheless, some noticeable differences could be observed. The quality of service attributes’ importance levels reveal overall changes in appreciations and consumption goals over time. The more frequent public transport user segments are more satisfied across the board and are characterized by a more balanced distribution of attribute importance while rural motorist commuters are markedly dissatisfied with service operation attributes. This work can help authorities to tailor their policies to specific traveler groups.

  • 42.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Total cost of ownership and its potential implications for battery electric vehicle diffusion2016In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 18, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have been slow to diffuse on the international as well as the Swedish market. Previous studies have indicated situational factors such as economic factors, size and performance to be of major importance for vehicle purchasers in their choice of vehicle. In this paper, the authors explore a consumer centric total cost of ownership (TCO) model to investigate the possible discrepancy between purchase price and the TCO between internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and BEVs. The creation and testing of the TCO model reveals that computation could be a challenging task for consumers due to bounded access of relevant data and the prediction of future conditions. The application of the model to the vehicle sample found that BEVs could be cheaper compared to ICEVs and HEVs. The findings in this paper could prove to be of importance for policy and marketing alike in designing the most appropriate business models and information campaigns based on consumer conditions in order to further promoting the diffusion of BEVs in society.

  • 43. Hai, Pham
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    The motorcycle ownership behaviour in Hanoi city, Vietnam: How unique are they?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44. Hossain, Maruf
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Green and fair: An exploratory study on the use of rickshaws as a transport mode in Dhaka, Bangladesh2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Hossain, Maruf
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    The exploration of rickshaw usage pattern and its social impacts in Dhaka city, Bangladesh2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. Hossain, Maruf
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    The exploration of rickshaw usage pattern and its social impacts in Dhaka city, Bangladesh2011In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, Vol. 2239, p. 74-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With primary data collected from rickshaw users in Dhaka, Bangladesh, this paper explores patterns of rickshaw use and the possible social impacts that may occur if rickshaws were banned from Dhaka. A survey of 450 rickshaw users from six different locations in Dhaka was carried out, and descriptive and multivariate (binomial and multinomial logit models) analyses were applied to explore the social impacts of rickshaws on various groups of society. The results show that the rickshaw plays a crucial role in Dhaka's transport system. The majority of people use the rickshaw as their main mode of transport for their commute and social and recreational trips. Use of the rickshaw as a school travel mode and its resilience during the monsoon period make the rickshaw invaluable for Dhaka transport and economic activity. The analyses further show that the level of importance of rickshaws is unique for each socioeconomic group. For instance, females and people from low- and middle-income groups are more likely to be socially excluded if the rickshaw were not available anymore. A multinomial logit examined a rickshaw-free scenario: results suggest that most of the modal shift would move toward auto-rickshaws and taxicabs, rather than other public transport modes, such as the bus.

  • 47. Jirsa, Vojtech
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Estimating the Hourly Variability of  Bicycle Trip Paterns and Characteristisc  from Automatic Bicycle Counters: Case Study In Prague, Czech Republic2016In: Proceedings of The Third International Conference on Traffic and Transport Engineering (ICTTE), Scientific Research Center , 2016, p. 769-776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays it is common for many cities around the world to use automatic bicycle counters laid at main road segments to monitor the cyclists' traffic flow at any given time in the given location. In most cases, this data is then used to identify the peak period of the bicycle traffic. This paper introduces a method to classify the characteristics of bicycle traffic flows and inferring different proportion trip purposes based on the variations of hourly counts. Whilst of many previous studies investigated the key determinants of bicycle travel demand detected by these counters, none of these studies tried to distinguish different portions of different traffic characteristics in each counting section. In most cases the trip purposes of cycling were grouped into either prevailing utilitarian or prevailing recreational. In reality, however, these recorded bicycle traffic contains both trip purposes. The method which is introduced in this paper was developed and tested on the longitudinal datasets obtained from the bicycle counting system in the city of Prague over five years' period, i.e. 2010 to 2015. The system consists of 26 counting facilities in various city quarters covering wide variety of road segments. In achieving the study objective, first, a theoretical assumption was done to differentiate three different basic traffic characteristics and their respective hourly variations, i.e.: utilitarian, recreational affected by workhours, and recreational not affected by workhours. These hypothetical hourly variations were tested and confirmed based on the observed Prague sample. Obtained results were discussed with respect to geographical location, built environment and knowledge of local situation. The hourly variations of the recorded bicycle flow were influenced by the build environment factors such as specific land use in the proximity of counting section. The results also indicate some specific routes (and its direction) preferences.

  • 48. Joewono, T. B.
    et al.
    Vandebona, U.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Behavioural Causes and Categories of Traffic Violations by Motorcyclists in Indonesian Urban Roads2015In: Journal of Transportation Safety and Security, ISSN 1943-9962, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 174-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To prevent road accidents and formulate policies to promote road safety in urban roads, it is crucial to understand factors that cause violation of traffic rules. Although such issues have been investigated in developed countries, the availability of such knowledge in rapidly motorizing countries, such as Indonesia, is still poor. This study aims to investigate the factors influencing violation behavior by motorcyclists and types of such violations. The study is based on surveys of three metropolitan cities, namely Bandung, Yogyakarta, and Surabaya, in Indonesia. Structural equation modelling has been performed to investigate factors influencing motorcyclists to commit traffic violations and their causal relationships. Although there are differences in the ranking of factors influencing traffic violations among the three cities studied, the analysis has been able to show patterns of similarities as well. The inadequacy of engineering and maintenance conditions of the road infrastructure appears to be partly responsible for the phenomenon of motorcyclists developing a lack of respect to traffic rules.

  • 49. Joewono, Tri B.
    et al.
    Tarigan, Ari K. M.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Road-based public transportation in urban areas of Indonesia: What policies do users expect to improve the service quality?2016In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 49, p. 114-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between road-based public transport users' preferences and expectations of particular levels of support and their support of a set of improvement policy scenarios in Indonesia. A series of structural equation modelling estimations was carried out, using empirical surveys among road-based public transportation users in three major urban areas: Jakarta, Bandung and Yogyakarta. The results show that negative experience, service importance and dissatisfaction are factors that significantly correlate with the user preferences in accepting improvement policies along with fare adjustment. The users' travel behaviours and their socio-demographic characteristics were also found to be significant in influencing the degree of such support. However, the results also show discrepancies in the influence of key determinants across the three studied cities, which indicates a need for locally designed approaches. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 50. Joewono, Tri Basuki
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    User Preferences regarding Public Transport Policies in Indonesian Cities: an Initial Study2011Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 175
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf