kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 191
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Exploiting simulation model potential in investigating handling capacity of Ro-Ro terminals: The case study of Norvik seaport2022In: Simulation Modelling Practice and Theory, ISSN 1569-190X, Vol. 117, p. 102513-102513, article id 102513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the spotlight is directed towards studying the handling capacity of pure Ro-Ro terminals, especially the new terminal of Norvik port. To this end, a simulation model based on a distributed architecture is built to assess the handling capacity under different flow scenarios with a particular focus on the trailer flow and export-lorry flow the terminal can handle in terms of resource availability, trailer-dwell times and management rules. This helped to determine the number of resources required to evacuate smoothly the incoming flows and to identify where potential bottlenecks happen the most inside the terminal. The established model is verified then validated by experts to conduct properly the experiment study where the model is fed with empirical data provided by terminal authorities. This experiment showed that the terminal can handle flows of which trailers do not exceed 17% and the export fraction of lorries is at most 42%.

  • 2.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Proposal of a module-driven architecture for building simulation models devoted to container terminals: dilemmas in applying generic, flexible, and modular principles2023In: Simulation (San Diego, Calif.), ISSN 0037-5497, E-ISSN 1741-3133, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 703-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Container terminals are complex systems where containerized cargo undergoes a set of processing and handling operations to be delivered to their outgoing modes. A pool of decision support methods and simulation models has been developed to assist planners and managers in making decisions about daily operations. Nevertheless, most are designed for a particular terminal and not generic types. Indeed, a generic model serves as a conceptual factory to create specific models which greatly reduces the time and efforts of development; however, building such a model is no mean feat. To this aim, the paper on hand discusses the complexity of applying genericity, flexibility, and modularity in system modeling and proposes a generic architecture to build modular and flexible simulation models for container terminals. This architecture is split into a set of smaller, manageable, well-connected, and generic modules that facilitate the creation of highly parametrized specific models. An illustrative example of the architecture usage is presented in a case study, the new container terminal of Stockholm, and the resulting models were validated by subject matter experts. Finally, to prove its efficiency, a numerical study fed with real data is conducted to investigate the handling capacity of the studied system under different handling and flow scenarios. The obtained results show that the terminal handling capacity can be increased by around 50% if three to four more straddle carriers are added to the existing fleet.

  • 3.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Marzano, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Boodaghian Asl, Arsineh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Lethvall, Sven
    Uppsala University Hospital,Uppsala,Sweden.
    Falk, Nina
    Uppsala University Hospital,Uppsala,Sweden.
    A Data-Driven Discrete Event Simulation Model to Improve Emergency Department Logistics2022In: Proceedings of the 2022 Winter Simulation Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands for health care are becoming overwhelming for healthcare systems around the world regarding theavailability of resources, particularly, in emergency departments (EDs) that are continuously open and mustserve immediately any patient who comes in. Efficient management of EDs and their resources is requiredmore than ever. This could be achieved either by optimizing resource utilization or by the improvement ofhospital layout. This paper investigates, through data-driven simulation alternative designs of workflowsand layouts to operate the ED of the Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden. Results are analyzed tounderstand the requirements across the hospital for reduced waiting times in the ED. The main observationrevealed that introducing a new ward dedicated to patients having complex diagnoses with a capacity ofless than 20 beds leads to lower waiting times. Furthermore, the use of data-mining was of great help inreducing the efforts of building the simulation model.

  • 4.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Boukachour, Jaouad
    Normandie University, UNIHAVRE, 76600 Le Havre, France.
    A model-driven design approach for Ro-Ro and container terminals: from requirements analysis down to simulation model implementation2021In: 20th International Conference on Modeling and Applied Simulation, MAS 2021, Cal-Tek Srl , 2021, p. 9-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling, one of the main pillars of good scientific research, is a long-standing multidisciplinary activity to understand and analyze complex systems. In this paper, the focus is directed toward conceptual modeling of multi-terminal seaports specialized in handling and treatment of intermodal transport units (ITU). These systems are complex with highly dynamic and stochastic behaviors and actors, therefore, studying them as a coherent whole or just analyzing one part by taking into account the high degree of integration among the different aspects and actors linked by a flow of activities, information, and interactions is a bet lost in advance without a well-defined design process. Several design approaches and methodologies have been proposed over the years, but nonetheless, there is still no agreement on how to conduct modeling of complex systems because they are of different kinds. In this line, this paper proposes a top-down approach for container and Ro-Ro terminals largely inspired by the Unified Process Methodology and refined through several research projects that we have been involved in. It gives some recommendations and guidelines as well as a helpful way to successfully build modular and consistent simulation models. To prove its efficiency, it was applied to a case study and the resulting models were validated by the subject matter's experts.

  • 5.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Ecole Cent Casablanca, Casablanca, Morocco..
    Rouky, Naoufal
    Euro-Mediterranean University, Fez, Morocco.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. Euro Mediterranean Univ, Fes, Morocco..
    A simulation-based decision support framework devoted to Ro-Ro terminals: Design, implementation and evaluation2023In: Computers & industrial engineering, ISSN 0360-8352, E-ISSN 1879-0550, Vol. 180, p. 109248-, article id 109248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a type of intermodal terminal, pure Ro-Ro terminals are one of the most important logistic hubs in the supply chain for rolling freight stored in containerized and wheeled steel boxes. These large-scale systems are highly complex, with nonlinear and hard-to-predict behavior evolving in a stochastic environment. Consequently, making decisions about any problem thereof is no mean feat, particularly for terminal planners. To assist them in decision-making, a pool of relevant models and tools have been developed over the years in the literature. Nevertheless, models that are oriented toward specific objectives dominate, and generic ones are rare. This paper tries to fill this gap and proposes a generic framework to be used as a factory to create specific decision support models based on simulation for pure Ro-Ro terminals. This framework is formulated following two artifacts: (1) the known classification of key performance indicators combined with the typical functional and physical organization of pure Ro-Ro terminals; (2) the three main arteries of harbor systems, namely flows, decisions and operations. Then a scalable way of making decisions based on a flexible form of the cost function weighted according to a set of coefficients is integrated. These designed coefficients allow decision-makers a wide flexibly in choosing how the best solutions are determined. An application of this framework is illustrated through a real case study, where the weights are estimated using an expert-profiling based approach then pushed into the OptQuest optimizer to be calibrated before analyzing the results. These results are aggregated, then expressed as scores on a scale of 0 to 1. This is to help terminal planners to easily identify the worst and best planning scenarios as well as the relationships and compatibilities between the involved handling rules to suggest different alternatives for managing operations.

  • 6. Albrecht, Stefano V.
    et al.
    Beck, J. Christopher
    Buckeridge, David L.
    Botea, Adi
    Caragea, Cornelia
    Chi, Chi-hung
    Damoulas, Theodoros
    Dilkina, Bistra
    Eaton, Eric
    Fazli, Pooyan
    Ganzfried, Sam
    Giles, C. Lee
    Guillet, Sebastien
    Holte, Robert
    Hutter, Frank
    Koch, Thorsten
    Leonetti, Matteo
    Lindauer, Marius
    Machado, Marlos C.
    Malitsky, Yuri
    Marcus, Gary
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Rossi, Francesca
    Shaban-Nejad, Arash
    Thiebaux, Sylvie
    Veloso, Manuela
    Walsh, Toby
    Wang, Can
    Zhang, Jie
    Zheng, Yu
    Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Series2015In: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25-26, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austin, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included Algorithm Configuration; Artificial Intelligence and Ethics; Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; Artificial Intelligence for Cities; Artificial Intelligence for Transportation: Advice, Inter-activity, and Actor Modeling; Beyond the Turing Test; Computational Sustainability; Computer Poker and Imperfect Information; Incentive and Trust in E-Communities; Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots; Learning for General Competency in Video Games; Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; Planning, Search, and Optimization; Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; Trajectory-Based Behaviour Analytics; and World Wide Web and Public Health Intelligence.

  • 7.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Context and Complexity in Telemedicine Evaluation: Work Domain Analysis in a Surgical Setting2021In: JMIR Perioperative Medicine, E-ISSN 2561-9128, Vol. 4, no 2, p. e26580-e26580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many promising telemedicine innovations fail to be accepted and used over time, and there are longstanding questions about howto best evaluate telemedicine services and other health information technologies. In response to these challenges, there is a growinginterest in how to take the sociotechnical complexity of health care into account during design, implementation, and evaluation.This paper discusses the methodological implications of this complexity and how the sociotechnical context holds the key tounderstanding the effects and outcomes of telemedicine. Examples from a work domain analysis of a surgical setting, where atelemedicine service for remote surgical consultation was to be introduced, are used to show how abstracted functional modelingcan provide a structured and rigorous means to analyze and represent the implementation context in complex health care settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Arnelo, Urban
    Groth, Kristina
    Modeling the Implementation Context of a Telemedicine Service: Work Domain Analysis in a Surgical Setting2021In: JMIR Formative Research, E-ISSN 2561-326X, Vol. 6, no 5, article id e26505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:A telemedicine service enabling remote surgical consultation had shown promising results. When the service was to be scaled up, it was unclear how contextual variations among different clinical sites could affect the clinical outcomes and implementation of the service. It is generally recognized that contextual factors and work system complexities affect the implementation and outcomes of telemedicine. However, it is methodologically challenging to account for context in complex health care settings. We conducted a work domain analysis (WDA), an engineering method for modeling and analyzing complex work environments, to investigate and represent contextual influences when a telemedicine service was to be scaled up to multiple hospitals.

    Objective:We wanted to systematically characterize the implementation contexts at the clinics participating in the scale-up process. Conducting a WDA would allow us to identify, in a systematic manner, the functional constraints that shape clinical work at the implementation sites and set the sites apart. The findings could then be valuable for informed implementation and assessment of the telemedicine service.

    Methods:We conducted observations and semistructured interviews with a variety of stakeholders. Thematic analysis was guided by concepts derived from the WDA framework. We identified objects, functions, priorities, and values that shape clinical procedures. An iterative “discovery and modeling” approach allowed us to first focus on one clinic and then readjust the scope as our understanding of the work systems deepened.

    Results:We characterized three sets of constraints (ie, facets) in the domain: the treatment facet, administrative facet (providing resources for procedures), and development facet (training, quality improvement, and research). The constraints included medical equipment affecting treatment options; administrative processes affecting access to staff and facilities; values and priorities affecting assessments during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; and resources for conducting the procedure.

    Conclusions:The surgical work system is embedded in multiple sets of constraints that can be modeled as facets of the system. We found variations between the implementation sites that might interact negatively with the telemedicine service. However, there may be enough motivation and resources to overcome these initial disruptions given that values and priorities are shared across the sites. Contrasting the development facets at different sites highlighted the differences in resources for training and research. In some cases, this could indicate a risk that organizational demands for efficiency and effectiveness might be prioritized over the long-term outcomes provided by the telemedicine service, or a reduced willingness or ability to accept a service that is not yet fully developed or adapted. WDA proved effective in representing and analyzing these complex clinical contexts in the face of technological change. The models serve as examples of how to analyze and represent a complex sociotechnical context during telemedicine design, implementation, and assessment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Frennert, Susanne
    Department of Computer Science and Media Technology, Internet of Things and People Research Center, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Telemedicine for Remote Surgical Guidance in Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Mixed Methods Study of Practitioner Attitudes2021In: JMIR Formative Research, E-ISSN 2561-326X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. e20692-e20692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Telemedicine innovations are rarely adopted into routine health care, the reasons for which are not well understood. Teleguidance, a promising service for remote surgical guidance during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was due to be scaled up, but there were concerns that user attitudes might influence adoption.

    Objective:Our objective was to gain a deeper understanding of ERCP practitioners’ attitudes toward teleguidance. These findings could inform the implementation process and future evaluations.

    Methods:We conducted semistructured interviews with ERCP staff about challenges during work and beliefs about teleguidance. Theoretical constructs from the technology acceptance model (TAM) guided the thematic analysis. Our findings became input to a 16-item questionnaire, investigating surgeons’ beliefs about teleguidance’s contribution to performance and factors that might interact with implementation.

    Results:Results from 20 interviews with ERCP staff from 5 hospitals were used to adapt a TAM questionnaire, exchanging the standard “Ease of Use” items for “Compatibility and Implementation Climate.” In total, 23 ERCP specialists from 15 ERCP clinics responded to the questionnaire: 9 novices (<500 ERCP procedures) and 14 experts (>500 ERCP procedures). The average agreement ratings for usefulness items were 64% (~9/14) among experts and 75% (~7/9) among novices. The average agreement ratings for compatibility items were somewhat lower (experts 64% [~9/14], novices 69% [~6/9]). The averages have been calculated from the sum of several items and therefore, they only approximate the actual values. While 11 of the 14 experts (79%) and 8 of the 9 novices (89%) agreed that teleguidance could improve overall quality and patient safety during ERCP procedures, only 8 of the 14 experts (57%) and 6 of the 9 novices (67%) agreed that teleguidance would not create new patient safety risks. Only 5 of the 14 experts (36%) and 3 of the 9 novices (33%) were convinced that video and image transmission would function well. Similarly, only 6 of the 14 experts (43%) and 6 of the 9 novices (67%) agreed that administration would work smoothly. There were no statistically significant differences between the experts and novices on any of the 16 items (P<.05).

    Conclusions:Both novices and experts in ERCP procedures had concerns that teleguidance might disrupt existing work practices. However, novices were generally more positive toward teleguidance than experts, especially with regard to the possibility of developing technical skills and work practices. While newly trained specialists were the main target for teleguidance, the experts were also intended users. As experts are more likely to be key decision makers, their attitudes may have a greater relative impact on adoption. We present suggestions to address these concerns. We conclude that using the TAM as a conceptual framework can support user-centered inquiry into telemedicine design and implementation by connecting qualitative findings to well-known analytical themes.

  • 10.
    Aminoff, Hedvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Groth, Kristina
    Arnelo, Urban
    User Experience in Remote Surgical Consultation: Survey Study of User Acceptance and Satisfaction in Real-Time Use of a Telemedicine Service2021In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 8, no 4, p. e30867-e30867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Teleguidance, a promising telemedicine service for intraoperative surgical consultation, was planned to scale upat a major academic hospital in partnership with 5 other hospitals. If the service was adopted and used over time, it was expectedto provide educational benefits and improve clinical outcomes during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP),which is a technically advanced procedure for biliary and pancreatic disease. However, it is known that seemingly successfulinnovations can play out differently in new settings, which might cause variability in clinical outcomes. In addition, few telemedicineservices survive long enough to deliver system-level outcomes, the causes of which are not well understood.Objective: We were interested in factors related to usability and user experience of the telemedicine service, which might affectadoption. Therefore, we investigated perceptions and responses to the use and anticipated use of a system. Technology acceptance,a construct referring to how users perceive a technology’s usefulness, is commonly considered to indicate whether a new technologywill actually be used in a real-life setting. Satisfaction measures were used to investigate whether user expectations and needshave been met through the use of technology. In this study, we asked surgeons to rate the perceived usefulness of teleguidance,and their satisfaction with the telemedicine service in direct conjunction with real-time use during clinical procedures.Methods: We designed domain-specific measures for perceived usefulness and satisfaction, based on performance and outcomemeasures for the clinical procedure. Surgeons were asked to rate their user experience with the telemedicine service in directconjunction with real-time use during clinical procedures.Results: In total, 142 remote intraoperative consultations were conducted during ERCP procedures at 5 hospitals. The demandfor teleguidance was more pronounced in cases with higher complexity. Operating surgeons rated teleguidance to have contributedto performance and outcomes to a moderate or large extent in 111 of 140 (79.3%) cases. Specific examples were that teleguidancewas rated as having contributed to intervention success and avoiding a repeated ERCP in 23 cases, avoiding 3 PTC, and 11referrals, and in 11 cases, combinations of these outcomes. Preprocedure beliefs about the usefulness of teleguidance weregenerally lower than postprocedure satisfaction ratings. The usefulness of teleguidance was mainly experienced through practicaladvice from the consulting specialist (119/140, 85%) and support with assessment and decision-making (122/140, 87%).Conclusions: Users’ satisfaction with teleguidance surpassed their initial expectations, mainly through contribution to nontechnicalaspects of performance, and through help with general assessment. Teleguidance shows the potential to improve performance and outcomes during ERCP. However, it takes hands-on experience for practitioners to understand how the new telemedicineservice contributes to performance and outcomes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Anand, N.
    et al.
    Meijer, D.
    van Duin, J. H. R.
    Tavasszy, L.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Validation of an agent based model using a participatory simulation gaming approach: The case of city logistics2016In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 71, p. 489-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agent-based modeling is used for simulating the actions and interactions of autonomous entities aiming to assessing their effects on the system as a whole. At an abstract level, an agent-based model (ABM) is a representation of the many simple agents and interactions among them. The decision making of the agents is based on the rules given to them. In an ABM, the model output is the result of internal decision-making and may differ with alteration in the decision path. On the contrary, with the set of rules embedded in agents, their behavior is modeled to take a ‘certain action’ in a ‘certain situation’. It suggests that the internal decision making behavior of agents is truly responsible for the model output and thus it cannot be ignored while validating ABMs. This research article focuses on the validating agents’ behavior by evaluating decision-making processes of agents. For this purpose, we propose a validation framework based on a participatory simulation game. Using this framework we engage a human player (i.e. a domain stakeholder) to allow us to collect information about choices and validate the behavior of an individual agent. A proof-of-concept game is developed for a city logistics ABM to test the framework.

  • 12.
    Assander, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Caring Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergström, Aileen
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Caring Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Caring Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Acad Primary Hlth Care Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Caring Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Med Unit Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Theme Womens Hlth & Allied Hlth Profess, Stockholm, Sweden..
    ASSIST: a reablement program for older adults in Sweden - a feasibility study2022In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Western countries emphasise the provision of assistive home care by implementing reablement services. Reablement services are offered to a limited degree in Sweden, and systematic research regarding outcomes and how reablement can be tailored to maximize benefits for older adults has been lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a novel reablement program (ASSIST 1.0) regarding study design and outcome measures, as well as fidelity, adherence, and acceptability of the program in a Swedish context. Method A non-randomised, quasi-experimental, mixed-method, pre/post-test design was applied with an intervention group receiving ASSIST 1.0 (n = 7) and a control group receiving regular home care (n = 10). ASSIST 1.0 was developed to empower older adults to increase their perceived performance and satisfaction of performing activities in everyday life as well as increase their perceived health, self-efficacy, and well-being. ASSIST 1.0 was founded on the concept of reablement and included three components: i) goal setting with The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), ii) provided support to home care staff to enhance their provision of reablement, and iii) explored the incorporation and use of an information- and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate information transfer. Results Using COPM for goal setting with older adults and providing support to the staff via workshops were valuable components in the delivery of ASSIST 1.0. The ICT product encountered several challenges and could not be evaluated. COPM and EQ-5D were deemed the most important instruments. Organisational and political barriers affected the feasibility. Although, the fidelity and adherence were complied the staff perceived the program to be acceptable. Conclusion The ASSIST 1.0 program was feasible in regard of study design, delivering the intervention, and evaluating instruments that detected a change. A logical progression would be to conduct a full-scale trial. In addition, a usability study to evaluate the technological component is also recommended. With minor improvements, the ASSIST 1.0 program has the potential to contribute to the development of a home care organisation that could enhance older adults possibility to age in place at home.

  • 13. Aydoǧan, R.
    et al.
    Lo, J. C.
    Meijer, Sebastian A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Jonker, C. M.
    Modeling network controller decisions based upon situation awareness through agent-based negotiation2014In: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2014, p. 191-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dutch railway traffic control is in an urgent need for innovation and therefore turns to gaming simulation as a platform to test and train future configurations of the system. The presence of relevant participants is necessary to keep the fidelity of the gaming simulation high. Network controllers are often needed in such games, but are expensive, scarce, and often have limited action, thus making their involvement less than desirable. To overcome this, the current paper introduces the use of intelligent software agents to replace some roles. The cognitive construct of situation awareness is required to model the evaluation of an offer in a negotiation setting, in which a situation awareness model (SAM) is introduced for evaluating offers in complex and dynamic systems.

  • 14.
    Azhari, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Design and Implementation of Interactive Visualizations and Simulation in Transportation2014In: The Shift from Teaching to Learning: Individual, Collective and Organizational Learning Through Gaming Simulation: Proceedings of the 45th Conferenceof the International Simulation and Gaming Association, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation Planners have a long history of using Geographical Information Systems, Simulation Models and Visualizations for decision support. A frame-work that integrates all three can provide enhanced decision support, opportuni-ties for training and planning future scenarios. In the current paper, we describe the concept of such a framework and the first steps toward its development.

  • 15.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development, Avancerad underhållsteknik och produktionslogistik.
    Soebke, Heinrich
    Bauhaus Univ Weimar, Goethepl 7-8, D-99423 Weimar, Germany..
    Broeker, Thomas
    Nuremberg Inst Technol, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Lim, Theodore
    Heriot Watt Univ, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Luccini, Angelo Marco
    Succubus Interact, Nantes, France..
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Current Competencies of Game Facilitators and Their Potential Optimization in Higher Education: Multimethod Study2021In: JMIR Serious Games, E-ISSN 2291-9279, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e25481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Serious games can be a powerful learning tool in higher education. However, the literature indicates that the learning outcome in a serious game depends on the facilitators' competencies. Although professional facilitators in commercial game-based training have undergone specific instruction, facilitators in higher education cannot rely on such formal instruction, as game facilitation is only an occasional part of their teaching activities. Objective: This study aimed to address the actual competencies of occasional game facilitators and their perceived competency deficits. Methods: Having many years of experience as professional and occasional facilitators, we (n=7) defined requirements for the occasional game facilitator using individual reflection and focus discussion. Based on these results, guided interviews were conducted with additional occasional game facilitators (n=4) to check and extend the requirements. Finally, a group of occasional game facilitators (n=30) answered an online questionnaire based on the results of the requirement analysis and existing competency models. Results: Our review produced the following questions: Which competencies are needed by facilitators and what are their training needs? What do current training courses for occasional game facilitators in higher education look like? How do the competencies of occasional game facilitators differ from other competencies required in higher education? The key findings of our analysis are that a mix of managerial and technical competencies is required for facilitating serious games in higher educational contexts. Further, there is a limited or no general competence model for game facilitators, and casual game facilitators rarely undergo any specific, formal training. Conclusions: The results identified the competencies that game facilitators require and a demand for specific formal training. Thus, the study contributes to the further development of a competency model for game facilitators and enhances the efficiency of serious games.

  • 16.
    Batterink, M.
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University.
    Tromp, S.
    Wageningen University.
    Simulaties en simulatiespellen2004In: Tools voor samenwerking in ketens en netwerken / [ed] Maarten Batterink, Paul Hoyer, Onno Omta and Lia Spaans-Dijkstra, Elsevier, 2004, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17. Bekebrede, Geertje
    et al.
    Harteveld, Casper
    Warmelink, Harald
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Beauty or the Beast: Importance of the Attraction of Educational Games2012In: Student Usability in Educational Software and Games: Improving Experiences, IGI Global, 2012, p. 138-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational games are often less attractive than entertainment games in visuals, gameplay, and other aspects, but do we need entertainment-level beauties in our education or are beasts sufficient? To identify the importance of attraction for educational games, the authors offer the results of a comparative analysis of five educational games used and evaluated from 2005-2010 (N=754). They operationalized attraction through statements in which players were asked to rate the games’ visual, gameplay, and user interface attractiveness. While some scholars argue that for game-based education to become successful, educational games need to be visually more attractive, the results of the analysis show the opposite. For educational games, attraction is of relatively low importance. The authors further found that gameplay is the most important aspect of attraction and visuals the least. These results contribute to the debate amongst designers and educators on what priorities to set when considering game-based education.

  • 18.
    Bekebrede, Geertje
    et al.
    Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Understanding Complex Infrastructure Systems: the Case of SimPort-MV22009In: 2009 Second International Conference on Infrastructure Systems and Services: Developing 21st Century Infrastructure Networks, (INFRA) / [ed] E Subrahmanian & J Schueler, IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning and design of infrastructures is a complicated process, which is caused by the complexity of the subject matter. The theory of Complex Adaptive Systems offers insights that can be of use in the design process. However, translating theory into practice is difficult. Gaming is proposed as a tool to bridge this gap by simulating complex adaptive systems. The objective of the paper is to analyze whether gaming can simulate the behavior of a complex adaptive system. We use the game SimPort-MV2 as a case study. Based on this example, we conclude that games can simulate complex adaptive systems. However, we raise specific concerns about the validity of the outcome and use of the game.

  • 19. Bekius, F.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    The redesign process of the timetable for the Dutch railway sector: A theoretical approach2018In: International Journal of System of Systems Engineering, ISSN 1748-0671, E-ISSN 1748-068X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 330-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of a new timetable for a railway system is a complex process. Focusing only on the product and the exchange of information between design phases, does not cover the complexity. Strategic actor behaviour and contextual factors are underexposed by research on theory of designing civil infrastructures. Therefore, we investigate the redesign process of the timetable for the Dutch railways from two perspectives: 1) an engineering perspective; 2) an actor and context perspective. To indicate the successes and failures of the redesign process it is characterised using the PSI framework which includes these two perspectives. Several design phases are distinguished and at the transitions misalignments are identified. The misalignments are compared with empirical data to conclude on a set of improvements. Areas perceived as problematic are knowledge transfer between design phases, decomposition of one design phase into several products, and composition of multiple products into one final design.

  • 20. Bekius, F.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Thomassen, H.
    A Real Case Application of Game Theoretical Concepts in a Complex Decision-Making Process: Case Study ERTMS2022In: Group Decision and Negotiation, ISSN 0926-2644, E-ISSN 1572-9907, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 153-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering systems are complex, amongst others due to the interdependencies between actor and technical aspects. This complexity has consequences for the way of designing such systems and, in particular, for the decision-making process. Recognizing the impossibility of having an optimal system design in such complex systems, this article explores how a game theoretical characterization of a decision-making process assists in the organization and design of the process itself. In contrast to a game theoretical analysis, which results in optimal outcomes, the characterization is fed back to the designers of the decision-making process during the course of the process. The study analyses how the game concept characterization was used, i.e., which strategies were defined during the game theory interventions, and what the consequences of these strategies were for the design of the decision-making process. The design of a new safety system ERTMS for the Dutch railway sector is the context in which the study was performed. The contribution is a successful approach to complex decision-making in multi-actor systems by identification of multiple game concepts over time, with periodic feedback into the designing system, and not the actual decision-making itself. In short, it supported adapting to an actor focus on the process, it affected the role and responsibilities of the program management, it contributed to (de)coupling of issues, and it influenced the capability of creating awareness amongst actors of the urgency of the decision window. The paper ends with reflections on the experience of intervening in a decision-making process with game theoretical concepts.

  • 21.
    Bekius, Femke
    et al.
    Radboud University NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Delft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands.
    Selecting the Right Game Concept for Social Simulation of Real-World Systems2020In: Springer Proceedings in Complexity, Springer , 2020, p. 71-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game theoretical models can be used for social simulation of real-world systems. These models describe the interaction between actors who have to make a decision. Before application of those models, the game concept that describes the situation at hand needs to be selected. Selecting the right game concept is crucial when choosing a model to simulate the process, but not trivial. In this paper we present a taxonomy of game concepts to select a set of suitable models.

  • 22.
    Bekius, Femke
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    de Bruijn, Hans
    Delft Univ Technol, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Collaboration patterns in the Dutch railway sector: Using game concepts to compare different outcomes in a unique development case2018In: Research in Transportation Economics, ISSN 0739-8859, E-ISSN 1875-7979, Vol. 69, p. 360-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making on changes to large infrastructural systems is complex. It involves many actors, the system shows unpredictable behaviour and the environment in which decision-making takes place is dynamic. In a unique development case of the Dutch railway sector two decision-making processes regarding the same issue are performed in two consecutive years. Although, from a technical perspective, the elements of the processes are similar, the decisions in each year are different. In this paper, we use game concepts to explain the different outcomes. Other frequently adopted decision-based models that focus on the technical perspective do not distinguish between both processes. Game concepts are able to reveal the hidden actor and context dynamics of the process and provide action perspective. To identify the game concepts present in the decision-making process, we first consider whether these concepts are mentioned in interviews with decision-makers in our case. Thereafter, we interpret the processes using the identified game concepts. The fact that, in the second year, more external issues are discussed and pressure increased created room for another decision.

  • 23.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evaluation of an intervention addressing a reablement programme for older, community-dwelling persons in Sweden (ASSIST 1.0): a protocol for a feasibility study2019In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e025870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Older persons with functional limitations often need assistance from home care staff to thrive and continue to live in their home environments. Reablement, a proactive, preventative approach administered by home care staff, stimulating active engagement of the older person, is often recommended. Even though reablement has a potential to become a new rehabilitation model and has been implemented in different countries in various degrees, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the process of establishing reablement, the theoretical underpinnings and the conditionality and outcomes in different contexts. This knowledge is needed before fullscale recommendations can be made for implementation in specific contexts. Aim This study protocol aims to present a feasibility study of the intervention, ASSIST 1.0, a theory-based reablement programme, which includes coaching of home care staff and digitally based smart products, in a Swedish context. Methods and analysis This feasibility study will evaluate the perceived value and acceptability of ASSIST 1.0 intervention programme regarding fidelity, reach and dose, and potential outcomes by using a pretest and post-test design involving an intervention group and a control group (n=30) of older persons living at home, needing home care services. Qualitative interviews with home care staff delivering ASSIST and the older adults receiving the intervention as well as their significant others will be conducted to explore aspects affecting the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional ethics board. The results of the feasibility study will form the base for refinement of the ASSIST programme and for the subsequent planning of a full-scale randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of the programme on a larger scale. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences as well as information to involved stakeholders.

  • 24. Bharosa, Nitesh
    et al.
    Janssen, Marijn
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology.
    Brave, Fritjof
    Designing and evaluating for Multi-agency Crisis Preparation: A Living Lab2010In: Proceedings of electronic government: 9th International conference, Berlin, Germany, 2010, p. 180-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public organizations show growing interest in the development of dashboards that aid relief agency managers in crisis preparation. Yet, there is a dearth of research on the development of such dashboards. This paper discusses the experiences gained from apioneering Living Lab on the development and evaluation of dashboards for assessingcrisis preparedness. In order to evaluate and further improve dashboards, a two-day user-centered gaming simulation was organized with forty relief agency managers. Asurvey distributed amongst the managers indicates that they were satisfied with the dashboards and intend to use these in practice. However, the managers suggested that the formulation and clustering of the performance indicators requires better alignment with the context of use. One of the main findings is that the high level of uncertainty regarding the final set of performance indicators and the corresponding norms demands flexibility in the dashboard architecture beyond the evaluation stage.

  • 25. Bharosa, Nitesh
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Janssen, Marijn
    Brave, Fritjof
    Are we prepared?: Experiences from developing dashboards for disaster preparation2010In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM2010), Seattle, USA, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relief agency managers show growing interest in dashboards for assessing multi-agency disaster preparedness. Yet, there is a dearth of research on the development and use of dashboards for disaster preparation. Consequently, information system architects in the disaster management domain have little guidance in developing dashboards. Here, dashboards refer to digitalized visualizations of performance indicators. In this paper, we discuss the experiences gained from an action research project on the development of dashboards for assessing disaster preparedness. The objective of this paper is to discuss experiences and tradeoffs extracted from the development of dashboards in practice. We organized a two-day gaming-simulation with relief agency managers for the evaluation of the dashboards. While the relief agency managers acknowledged the usefulness of dashboards in the disaster preparation process and expressed their intention to use these in practice, they suggested that the formulation and clustering of performance indicators requires further research.

  • 26.
    Boodaghian Asl, Arsineh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A hybrid modeling approach to simulate complex systems and classify behaviors2024In: NETWORK MODELING AND ANALYSIS IN HEALTH INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS, ISSN 2192-6662, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many important systems, both natural and artificial, are complex in nature, and models and simulations are one of the main instruments to study them. In this paper, we present an approach where a complex social system is represented at a high level of abstraction as a network, thereby addressing several challenges such as quantification, intervention, adaptation and validation. The network represents the factors that influence the mental health and wellbeing in children and young people. In this article, we present an approach that links a system dynamics simulation to simulate the network and ranking algorithms to measure the vertices' behaviors. The network is enhanced by adding edge strengths in the form of correlations between vertices (established through literature). Such an approach allows us to exploit the network structure to qualify and quantify the vertices of the network, to overlay different processes over the network topology, to add and remove new vertices, and therefore interact dynamically. This in turn allows for the qualification of vertices' importance and network resilience. System dynamics simulation allows for policy analysis, where different scenarios are analyzed by stimulating a set of vertices and the effect over the network is observed. This approach allows for an abstract, flexible, yet comprehensive way of analyzing a complex social network at any scale.

  • 27.
    Boodaghian Asl, Arsineh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Simulation and Model Validation for Mental Health Factors Using a Multi-Methodology Hybrid Approach2021In: Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To promote policy analysis and decision-making in mental health and well-being, simulations are used to scrutinize causal maps and provide policymakers reasonable evidence. This paper proposes and illustrates a multi-methodology hybrid approach by building a hierarchy of models, moving from a systems dynamics model to a simulation based on PageRank to quantify and assess a complex mental health map. The motives are: (1) to aid scenario analysis and comparison for possible policy interventions, (2) to quantify and validate mental health factors, and (3) to gain new insights into the core and confounding factors that affect mental health. The results indicate that the approach identifies factors that cause significant and frequent variation on mental health. Furthermore, validation confirms PageRank accuracy and detects minor fluctuations and variation in model's output behavior.

  • 28.
    Boodaghian Asl, Arsineh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Using pageRank and social network analysis to specify mental health factors2021In: Proceedings of the Design Society: 23rd International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 2021,, Cambridge University Press (CUP) , 2021, Vol. 1, p. 3379-3388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various factors influence mental well-being, and span individual, social and familial levels. These factors are connected in many ways, forming a complex web of factors and providing pathways for developing programs to improve well-being and for further research. These factors can be studied individually using traditional methods and mapped together to be analyzed holistically from a complex system perspective. This study provides a novel approach using PageRank and social network analysis to understand such maps. The motives are: (1) to realize the most influential factors in such complex networks, (2) to understand factors that influence variations from different network aspects. A previously developed map for children's mental well-being was adopted to evaluate the approach. To achieve our motives, we have developed an approach using PageRank and Social Network Analysis. The results indicate that regardless of the network scale, two key factors called "Quantity and Quality of Relationships" and "Advocacy" can influence children's mental well-being significantly. Moreover, the divergence analysis reveals that one factor, "Recognition/Value Placed on well-being at School" causes a wide range of diffusion throughout the system.

  • 29.
    Danell Lindström, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Towards a systems model to inform policy and interventions for medication adherence in chronic disease2021In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, ISSN 2210-7703, E-ISSN 2210-7711, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 293-293Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Darwich, Adam S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Bostroem, Anne-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nursing, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Aging, Huddinge, Sweden.;Stockholms Sjukhem, Res & Dev Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Hlth, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Med Unit Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Theme Womens Hlth & Allied Profess, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Investigating the Connections Between Delivery of Care, Reablement, Workload, and Organizational Factors in Home Care Services: Mixed Methods Study2023In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 10, article id e42283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Home care is facing increasing demand due to an aging population. Several challenges have been identified in the provision of home care, such as the need for support and tailoring support to individual needs. Goal-oriented interventions, such as reablement, may provide a solution to some of these challenges. The reablement approach targets adaptation to disease and relearning of everyday life skills and has been found to improve health-related quality of life while reducing service use.Objective: The objective of this study is to characterize home care system variables (elements) and their relationships (connections) relevant to home care staff workload, home care user needs and satisfaction, and the reablement approach. This is to examine the effects of improvement and interventions, such as the person-centered reablement approach, on the delivery of home care services, workload, work-related stress, home care user experience, and other organizational factors. The main focus was on Swedish home care and tax-funded universal welfare systems.Methods: The study used a mixed methods approach where a causal loop diagram was developed grounded in participatory methods with academic health care science research experts in nursing, occupational therapy, aging, and the reablement approach. The approach was supplemented with theoretical models and the scientific literature. The developed model was verified by the same group of experts and empirical evidence. Finally, the model was analyzed qualitatively and through simulation methods.Results: The final causal loop diagram included elements and connections across the categories: stress, home care staff, home care user, organization, social support network of the home care user, and societal level. The model was able to qualitatively describe observed intervention outcomes from the literature. The analysis suggested elements to target for improvement and the potential impact of relevant studied interventions. For example, the elements "workload" and "distress" were important determinants of home care staff health, provision, and quality of care.Conclusions: The developed model may be of value for informing hypothesis formulation, study design, and discourse within the context of improvement in home care. Further work will include a broader group of stakeholders to reduce the risk of bias. Translation into a quantitative model will be explored.

  • 31. Den Hengst, Marielle
    et al.
    Bekebrede, Geertje
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Training Adjunct Commissionaires of Police in an Open Simulation: Methodological Challenges from a Politically Sensitive Case2012In: Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, ISSN 1752-4512, E-ISSN 1752-4520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Dhar, U.
    et al.
    Dubey, J.
    Dumblekar, V.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Lukosch, H.
    Preface2022In: 52nd International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2021, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. v-viConference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Flötteröd, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming simulations with environmental trajectories that maximize information gain2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), IEEE , 2012, p. 6465068-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulations put real actors in simulated environments. Example applications are training and scenario analysis in transport operations and disaster management. Running a single gaming simulation is an expensive endeavor and therefore must be led through interesting scenario configurations to maximize the learning or research outcomes. This article presents an approach to automatically control the simulated environment in account for the real players' behavior such that a maximum usability of the session is ensured. The approach accesses elements from discrete choice theory and provides the game designer with different options to tailor the type of learning. An archetypical application demonstrates the usefulness of the approach.

  • 34. Grogan, P. T.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Gaming Methods in Engineering Systems Research2017In: Systems Engineering, ISSN 1098-1241, E-ISSN 1520-6858, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 542-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent interest in applications of games and gaming methods has stimulated discussion of their use in engineering systems research. Simulation games or gaming simulations are interactive environments which simultaneously model a technical system through simulation and a social system with role-play participants. Their boundary-spanning nature aligns with challenges in engineering systems to consider both technical and social factors in design. This paper outlines a class of gaming methods for research in engineering systems. Key contributions synthesize diverse bodies of literature to classify gaming applications as generating generalizable and contextual knowledge to benefit participants and principals, identify intellectual foundations in related social sciences, and describe the dual purpose of games as a research method for analytical or design science objectives. Conclusions highlight opportunities and challenges for gaming research methods to accommodate social science research in design-centric activities.

  • 35.
    Güneysu Özgür, Arzu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. Chili Lab, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Majlesi, A. R.
    Taburet, V.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Leite, Iolanda
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Kuoppamäki, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Designing Tangible Robot Mediated Co-located Games to Enhance Social Inclusion for Neurodivergent Children2022In: Proceedings of Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2022, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2022, p. 536-543Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurodivergent children with cognitive and communicative difficulties often experience a lower level of social integration in comparison to neurotypical children. Therefore it is crucial to understand social inclusion challenges and address exclusion. Since previous work shows that gamified robotic activities have a high potential to enable inclusive and collaborative environments we propose using robot-mediated games for enhancing social inclusion. In this work, we present the design of a multiplayer tangible Pacman game with three different inter-player interaction modalities: semi-dependent collaborative, dependent collaborative, and competitive. The initial usability evaluation and the observations of the experiments show the benefits of the game for creating collaborative and cooperative practices for the players and thus also potential for social interaction and social inclusion. Importantly, we observe that inter-player interaction design affects the communication between the players and their physical interaction with the game.

  • 36.
    Harteveld, Casper
    et al.
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Sutherland, Steven
    University of Houston-Clear Lake, Houston, TX, USA.
    Troiano, Giovanni
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.
    Lukosch, Heide
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Preface2023In: Simulation and Gamingfor Social Impact: 53rd International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2022, Boston, MA, USA, July 11–14, 2022. Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Harteveld C., Troiano G., Sutherland S., Lukosch H., Meijer S., Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2023, 13622, Vol. 13622 LNCS, p. v-viChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH. BIBA, Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik an der Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Carretero, Ramos Miguel
    KTH.
    Kodjabachian, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Duqueroie, B.
    Protoworld: a simulation based gaming environment to model and plan urban mobility2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 393-400Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will offer the participants the opportunity to explore and test a gaming environment integrating simulation data from different sources. The participants will model and play different mobility options for five European cities. The ProtoWorld solution integrates different simulations and street maps in Unity and allows a playful experience in urban mobility planning. The software will be available for the participants also after the workshop for further experimentation.

  • 38.
    Hellstrand, Mikaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Tensions between real-world practices and the digitalization paradigm for data-driven services in eldercare: observations from an ethnographic study in Sweden2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of a data-driven approach within the health care system happens in a rapid pace; including in the eldercare sector. Within Swedish eldercare, data-driven health approach is not yet widely implemented. In the specific context of long-term care for older adults, quality of care is as much determined by how social care is being performed as it is by what kind medical care that is provided. In particular, relational aspects have been proven to have a crucial influence on the experience of quality of care for the actors involved. Drawing on ethnographic material collected at a Swedish nursing home, this paper explores in what way the relational aspects of care could potentially become affected by the increased use of a data-driven health approach. Methods: An ethnographic approach was adopted in order to investigate the daily care work at a long-term care facility as it unfolded. Fieldwork was conducted at a somatic ward in a Swedish long-term care facility over 4 months (86 h in total), utilizing the methods of participant observation, informal interviews and document analysis. The material was analyzed iteratively throughout the entire research process adopting thematic analysis. Results: Viewing our ethnographic material through an observational lense problematising the policy discourse around data-driven health approach, two propositions were developed. First, we propose that relational knowledge risk becoming less influential in shaping everyday care, when moving to a data-driven health approach. Second, we propose that quality of care risk becoming more directed on quality of medical care at the expense of quality of life. Conclusion: While the implementation of data-driven health approach within long-term care for older adults is not yet widespread, the general development within health care points towards a situation in which this will become reality. Our study highlights the importance of taking the relational aspects of care into consideration, both during the planning and implementation phase of this process. By doing this, the introduction of a data-driven health approach could serve to heighten the quality of care in a way which supports both quality of medical care and quality of life.

  • 39. Hellström Karlsson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Aiding Remote Diagnosis with Text Mining2018In: Proceedings of the 31st International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, FLAIRS 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the increase of digital healthcare providers, theinterest in diagnostic aids for remote diagnosis has increasedas well. As patients write about their symptoms themselves,we have access to a type of data which previously was rarelyrecorded, and which has not been filtered by a healthcareprofessional. Knowledge of similar patients and similarsymptoms is beneficial for doctors to arrive at a diagnosis.Therefore, the remote diagnostic process could be aided bypresenting patient cases together with information aboutsimilar patients and their self-reported symptom descriptions.Apart from online diagnosis, such an aid could bebeneficial in many healthcare settings, such as long-distancevisits and knowledge gain from patient diaries.In this paper, we present the impact of aiding remote diagnosisby presenting clusters of similar symptoms, usingsymptom descriptions collected from a virtual visit applicationby the Swedish telemedicine provider KRY. Symptomdescriptions were represented using the bag-of-words modeland were then clustered using the k-means algorithm. Anexperiment was then conducted with 13 doctors, where patientcases were presented together with the most representativewords of the associated cluster, to measure howtheir work was impacted. Results indicated that it was usefulin more complicated cases, but also that future experimentswill require further instructions on how the information is tobe interpreted.

  • 40.
    Hlotova, Yevheniia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Netherlands.
    Measuring Bus Drivers' Occupational Stress Under Changing Working Conditions2014In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2415, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is an immense problem in modern society; approximately half of all occupational illnesses are directly or indirectly related to stress. The work of a bus driver is typically associated with high stress levels that negatively influence individual well-being as well as workforce management. The current study examined the impact of newly proposed working conditions on bus drivers' occupational stress by monitoring heart rate and by collecting data on mental workload with a questionnaire in operational driving conditions. The main determinants of stress levels were identified through multiple regression analysis. Results indicated that bus drivers experienced considerably lower stress levels under a new control strategy that shifts the performance objective from schedule adherence to service regularity. Higher stress levels were recorded during extreme weather conditions and peak hours and among inexperienced drivers. The measurements were performed with low-cost sports devices that can easily be used by practitioners.

  • 41.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Jonker, Catholijn
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Verwaart, Tim
    Wageningen University and Research.
    Modelling Trade and Trust across Cultures2006In: TRUST MANAGEMENT, PROCEEDINGS  , Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, Vol. 3986, no 1, p. 120-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Misunderstandings arise in international trade due to difference in cultural background of trade partners. Trust and the role it plays in trade are influenced by culture. Considering that trade always involves working on the relationship with the trade partner, understanding the behaviour of the other is of the essence. This paper proposes to involve cultural dimensions in the modelling of trust in trade situations. A case study is presented to show a conceptualisation of trust with respect to the cultural dimension of performance orientation versus cooperation orientation.

  • 42.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Kramer, Mark
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Wijdemans, Jeroen
    Information Technology, Wageningen University.
    A Chain Game for distributed trading and negotiation2001In: Experimental Learning in Industrial Management: Transference & Creation of Knowledge: 6th International Workshop on Simulation Gaming in Production Management / [ed] Juan Cano, Zaragoza University , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Kramer, Mark
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Wijdemans, Jeroen
    Information Technology, Wageningen University.
    A chain game for distributed trading and negotiation2003In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 111-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, SebastiaanWageningen University.Smeds, RiittaAalto University.Riis, Jens OveAalborg University.
    Proceedings of the 8th International workshop on experimental learning in chains and networks2004Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Jonker, Catholijn
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen UR, Den Haag, Netherlands.
    Tykhonov, Dmytro
    Delft University of Technology.
    Verwaart, Tim
    Wageningen University and Research.
    Multi-agent Model of Trust in a Human Game2006In: Lecture notes in economics and mathematical systems, ISSN 0075-8442, E-ISSN 2196-9957, Vol. 564, no 3, p. 91-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual-level trust is formalized within the context of a multi-agent system that models human behaviour with respect to trust in the Trust and Tracing game. This is a trade game on commodity supply chains and networks, designed as a research tool and to be played by human players. The model of trust is characterised by its learning ability, its probabilistic nature, and how experience influences trust. The validity of the trust model is tested by comparing simulation results with aggregated results of human players. More specifically the simulations show the same effects as human plays on selected parameters like confidence, tracing cost, and the trust update coefficient on observable game statistics like number of cheats, traces, certificates, and guarantees.

  • 46.
    Kabir, Zarina Nahar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leung, Angela Yee Man
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Sch Nursing, Ctr Gerontol Nursing, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Grundberg, Åke
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Sophiahemmet Univ, Dept Nursing Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Aging, Huddinge, Sweden.;Stockholms Sjukhem, R&D Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laemas, Kristina
    Umeå Univ, Dept Nursing, Umeå, Sweden..
    Kallstroem, Ana Paula
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Moberg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cronfalk, Berit Seiger
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Red Cross Univ Coll, Div Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Konradsen, Hanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Nursing, Alfred Nobels Alle 23, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Care of family caregivers of persons with dementia (CaFCa) through a tailor-made mobile app: study protocol of a complex intervention study2020In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundGlobally, family members account for the main source of caregiving of persons with dementia living at home. Providing care to family members with dementia often has negative health consequences for caregivers such as stress, depression and low quality of life. Yet, formal support for family caregivers (FCs) is limited. Telehealth technology has the potential to provide health care and social support to FCs. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of providing support by healthcare professionals (HPs) through a mobile app in reducing stress, depressive symptoms and loneliness, and improving mental health and quality of life of FCs of persons with dementia.MethodsUsing a pragmatic intervention design, this study will use pre- and post-intervention assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed intervention in a sample of 78 FCs of persons with dementia (PWD). The intervention will be implemented by approximately 5 HPs specialized in dementia care based in the municipalities in Sweden. The main thrust of the intervention is to provide professional support, with help of an interactive mobile app, to family members in their caregiving role for PWDs. Qualitative interviews with HPs and FCs form the groundwork of the development of the mobile app. By using the app on smart phone or tablet, the FC, in groups of 8-10, will communicate with peers and a HP exchanging ideas on how to deal with PWD's behavioral and cognitive changes and get support. They will also be able to discuss stressful events and access mindfulness exercises focused on themselves. Quantitative data will be collected before and at three time points after the 8-week intervention to assess changes in the health outcomes of the FCs. In-depth interviews will be conducted after the intervention to capture the experiences of FCs and HPs regarding the ease of use and acceptability of the app.DiscussionThis tailor-made mobile app has the high potential to be a practical platform for supporting FCs to alleviate stress and improve mental health irrespective of distance to the nearest health care or social service center.Trial registrationISRCTN, ISRCTN46137262. Registered 10 October 2019.

  • 47. Kleiman, F.
    et al.
    Janssen, M.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Evaluation of a Pilot Game to Change Civil Servants’ Willingness Towards Open Data Policy Making2021In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), Springer Nature , 2021, p. 23-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of open data policy-making by governments is limited due to different types of constraints. Civil servants are reluctant to open their data to the public for many reasons. The lack of knowledge of benefits that can be produced by the release of data and the overestimation of risks and operational complexity seems to decrease their willingness to support the opening of data. The idea that a serious game intervention can change awareness of participants in different domains is already known. Yet, games are domain dependent and concepts differ per domain. A game has never been used for the emerging domain of open data in which civil servants are operating in a bureaucratic environment having a risk-averse culture and strict institutional rules. A role-playing game prototype was designed for civil servants to experience open data policy-making. This paper analyses its first results aiming at changes of perception for the participants of the game and aims to understand the changes in behavior of civil servants that played it. For some participants, the game influenced their attitude, whereas others were not influenced. Suggesting that different approaches might be necessary for changing the attitude of different groups.

  • 48. Kleiman, F.
    et al.
    Janssen, M.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH.
    Serious gaming for developing open government data policies by local governments2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 702-703Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing open government by local government is cumbersome. Many local governments have no policies or are struggling to develop policies enabling to create value from open data. Policy-making is challenging due to the wicked nature of many policy problems, unclear objectives, and the involvement of diverse stakeholders. At the same time governments are opening their policy-making processes for participation by citizens and private companies. The goal of this paper is to present the structure of a game to increase the understanding of open-data policies by local governments. Open Data Policies are aimed at making public data available to be accessed and used by civil society. The game participants can experience the implications of various policies. This should help them to developed better policies.

  • 49. Kleiman, F.
    et al.
    Janssen, M.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Jansen, S. J. T.
    Changing civil servants’ behaviour concerning the opening of governmental data: evaluating the effect of a game by comparing civil servants’ intentions before and after a game intervention2020In: International Review of Administrative Sciences, ISSN 0020-8523, E-ISSN 1461-7226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Open data policies are increasingly being adopted by governments. However, civil servants find it challenging to comply with open data policies. Gaming can help civil servants to practise opening data and can change their behaviour to support the opening of more data. In this article, the effect of playing a game is evaluated in an experiment in which several factors that influence the opening of data are compared before and after the game. The benefits appeared in unexpected ways and areas. Data management, privacy and security knowledge was transferred using the game, the perception of benefits showed significant changes, and behavioural intention was positively affected. Points for practitioners: Civil servants’ behaviour influences how public policies are enacted. The release of open data by governments is related by many as crucial for increasing public transparency and civic participation, and generating new economic opportunities. Games can influence the attitude of civil servants and, consequently, change governments’ decisions. Transferring knowledge and providing insights from new experiences can influence civil servants’ attitudes to open data. Moreover, governments can use games to influence civil servants’ attitudes.

  • 50.
    Kleiman, F.
    et al.
    Faculty of Technology, Policy 8 Management, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Janssen, M.
    Faculty of Technology, Policy 8 Management, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Gaming for Meaningful Interactions in Teleworking Lessons Learned during the COVID-19 Pandemic from Integrating Gaming in Virtual Meetings2020In: Digital Government: Research and Practice, ISSN 2639-0175, Vol. 1, no 4, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent need for social-distancing caused by COVID-19 resulted in working remotely, which can cause loneliness and disconnect from the organization. The pandemic stimulated people to look for novel ways to interact and, at the same time, socialize with each other. The change to home office increased the number of people using digital video calls; however, these impose restrictions on social bonding. In this commentary, we argue that the social bonding capacity of video calls can be increased by using games. Playing games can create a common object with shared goals, which can give players the feeling of being in the same environment, belonging to the same organization, working on joint objectives, and give an enjoyable experience. All work activities will unlikely return to the office after the pandemic is over, and preparing for remote working and socialization is needed. We recommend several avenues for research, including researching the concepts of online socialization and evaluating the effectiveness of gaming.

1234 1 - 50 of 191
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf