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  • 1. Albrecht, Stefano V.
    et al.
    Beck, J. Christopher
    Buckeridge, David L.
    Botea, Adi
    Caragea, Cornelia
    Chi, Chi-hung
    Damoulas, Theodoros
    Dilkina, Bistra
    Eaton, Eric
    Fazli, Pooyan
    Ganzfried, Sam
    Giles, C. Lee
    Guillet, Sebastien
    Holte, Robert
    Hutter, Frank
    Koch, Thorsten
    Leonetti, Matteo
    Lindauer, Marius
    Machado, Marlos C.
    Malitsky, Yuri
    Marcus, Gary
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Rossi, Francesca
    Shaban-Nejad, Arash
    Thiebaux, Sylvie
    Veloso, Manuela
    Walsh, Toby
    Wang, Can
    Zhang, Jie
    Zheng, Yu
    Reports on the 2015 AAAI Workshop Series2015In: The AI Magazine, ISSN 0738-4602, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AAAI's 2015 Workshop Program was held Sunday and Monday, January 25-26, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Austin Hotel in Austin, Texas, USA. The AAAI-15 workshop program included 16 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. Most workshops were held on a single day. The titles of the workshops included Algorithm Configuration; Artificial Intelligence and Ethics; Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments; Artificial Intelligence for Cities; Artificial Intelligence for Transportation: Advice, Inter-activity, and Actor Modeling; Beyond the Turing Test; Computational Sustainability; Computer Poker and Imperfect Information; Incentive and Trust in E-Communities; Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots; Learning for General Competency in Video Games; Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination; Planning, Search, and Optimization; Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas; Trajectory-Based Behaviour Analytics; and World Wide Web and Public Health Intelligence.

  • 2. Anand, N.
    et al.
    Meijer, D.
    van Duin, J. H. R.
    Tavasszy, L.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Validation of an agent based model using a participatory simulation gaming approach: The case of city logistics2016In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 71, p. 489-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agent-based modeling is used for simulating the actions and interactions of autonomous entities aiming to assessing their effects on the system as a whole. At an abstract level, an agent-based model (ABM) is a representation of the many simple agents and interactions among them. The decision making of the agents is based on the rules given to them. In an ABM, the model output is the result of internal decision-making and may differ with alteration in the decision path. On the contrary, with the set of rules embedded in agents, their behavior is modeled to take a ‘certain action’ in a ‘certain situation’. It suggests that the internal decision making behavior of agents is truly responsible for the model output and thus it cannot be ignored while validating ABMs. This research article focuses on the validating agents’ behavior by evaluating decision-making processes of agents. For this purpose, we propose a validation framework based on a participatory simulation game. Using this framework we engage a human player (i.e. a domain stakeholder) to allow us to collect information about choices and validate the behavior of an individual agent. A proof-of-concept game is developed for a city logistics ABM to test the framework.

  • 3. Aydoǧan, R.
    et al.
    Lo, J. C.
    Meijer, Sebastian A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Jonker, C. M.
    Modeling network controller decisions based upon situation awareness through agent-based negotiation2014In: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Springer-Verlag Tokyo Inc., 2014, p. 191-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dutch railway traffic control is in an urgent need for innovation and therefore turns to gaming simulation as a platform to test and train future configurations of the system. The presence of relevant participants is necessary to keep the fidelity of the gaming simulation high. Network controllers are often needed in such games, but are expensive, scarce, and often have limited action, thus making their involvement less than desirable. To overcome this, the current paper introduces the use of intelligent software agents to replace some roles. The cognitive construct of situation awareness is required to model the evaluation of an offer in a negotiation setting, in which a situation awareness model (SAM) is introduced for evaluating offers in complex and dynamic systems.

  • 4.
    Azhari, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Design and Implementation of Interactive Visualizations and Simulation in Transportation2014In: The Shift from Teaching to Learning: Individual, Collective and Organizational Learning Through Gaming Simulation: Proceedings of the 45th Conferenceof the International Simulation and Gaming Association, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation Planners have a long history of using Geographical Information Systems, Simulation Models and Visualizations for decision support. A frame-work that integrates all three can provide enhanced decision support, opportuni-ties for training and planning future scenarios. In the current paper, we describe the concept of such a framework and the first steps toward its development.

  • 5.
    Batterink, M.
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University.
    Tromp, S.
    Wageningen University.
    Simulaties en simulatiespellen2004In: Tools voor samenwerking in ketens en netwerken / [ed] Maarten Batterink, Paul Hoyer, Onno Omta and Lia Spaans-Dijkstra, Elsevier, 2004, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6. Bekebrede, Geertje
    et al.
    Harteveld, Casper
    Warmelink, Harald
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Beauty or the Beast: Importance of the Attraction of Educational Games2012In: Student Usability in Educational Software and Games: Improving Experiences, IGI Global, 2012, p. 138-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational games are often less attractive than entertainment games in visuals, gameplay, and other aspects, but do we need entertainment-level beauties in our education or are beasts sufficient? To identify the importance of attraction for educational games, the authors offer the results of a comparative analysis of five educational games used and evaluated from 2005-2010 (N=754). They operationalized attraction through statements in which players were asked to rate the games’ visual, gameplay, and user interface attractiveness. While some scholars argue that for game-based education to become successful, educational games need to be visually more attractive, the results of the analysis show the opposite. For educational games, attraction is of relatively low importance. The authors further found that gameplay is the most important aspect of attraction and visuals the least. These results contribute to the debate amongst designers and educators on what priorities to set when considering game-based education.

  • 7.
    Bekebrede, Geertje
    et al.
    Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Department of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands.
    Understanding Complex Infrastructure Systems: the Case of SimPort-MV22009In: 2009 Second International Conference on Infrastructure Systems and Services: Developing 21st Century Infrastructure Networks, (INFRA) / [ed] E Subrahmanian & J Schueler, IEEE conference proceedings, 2009, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning and design of infrastructures is a complicated process, which is caused by the complexity of the subject matter. The theory of Complex Adaptive Systems offers insights that can be of use in the design process. However, translating theory into practice is difficult. Gaming is proposed as a tool to bridge this gap by simulating complex adaptive systems. The objective of the paper is to analyze whether gaming can simulate the behavior of a complex adaptive system. We use the game SimPort-MV2 as a case study. Based on this example, we conclude that games can simulate complex adaptive systems. However, we raise specific concerns about the validity of the outcome and use of the game.

  • 8. Bekius, F.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    The redesign process of the timetable for the Dutch railway sector: A theoretical approach2018In: International Journal of System of Systems Engineering, ISSN 1748-0671, E-ISSN 1748-068X, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 330-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of a new timetable for a railway system is a complex process. Focusing only on the product and the exchange of information between design phases, does not cover the complexity. Strategic actor behaviour and contextual factors are underexposed by research on theory of designing civil infrastructures. Therefore, we investigate the redesign process of the timetable for the Dutch railways from two perspectives: 1) an engineering perspective; 2) an actor and context perspective. To indicate the successes and failures of the redesign process it is characterised using the PSI framework which includes these two perspectives. Several design phases are distinguished and at the transitions misalignments are identified. The misalignments are compared with empirical data to conclude on a set of improvements. Areas perceived as problematic are knowledge transfer between design phases, decomposition of one design phase into several products, and composition of multiple products into one final design.

  • 9.
    Bekius, Femke
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    de Bruijn, Hans
    Delft Univ Technol, Jaffalaan 5, NL-2628 BX Delft, Netherlands..
    Collaboration patterns in the Dutch railway sector: Using game concepts to compare different outcomes in a unique development case2018In: RESEARCH IN TRANSPORTATION ECONOMICS, Vol. 69, p. 360-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making on changes to large infrastructural systems is complex. It involves many actors, the system shows unpredictable behaviour and the environment in which decision-making takes place is dynamic. In a unique development case of the Dutch railway sector two decision-making processes regarding the same issue are performed in two consecutive years. Although, from a technical perspective, the elements of the processes are similar, the decisions in each year are different. In this paper, we use game concepts to explain the different outcomes. Other frequently adopted decision-based models that focus on the technical perspective do not distinguish between both processes. Game concepts are able to reveal the hidden actor and context dynamics of the process and provide action perspective. To identify the game concepts present in the decision-making process, we first consider whether these concepts are mentioned in interviews with decision-makers in our case. Thereafter, we interpret the processes using the identified game concepts. The fact that, in the second year, more external issues are discussed and pressure increased created room for another decision.

  • 10.
    Bergström, Aileen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evaluation of an intervention addressing a reablement programme for older, community-dwelling persons in Sweden (ASSIST 1.0): a protocol for a feasibility study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e025870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Older persons with functional limitations often need assistance from home care staff to thrive and continue to live in their home environments. Reablement, a proactive, preventative approach administered by home care staff, stimulating active engagement of the older person, is often recommended. Even though reablement has a potential to become a new rehabilitation model and has been implemented in different countries in various degrees, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the process of establishing reablement, the theoretical underpinnings and the conditionality and outcomes in different contexts. This knowledge is needed before fullscale recommendations can be made for implementation in specific contexts. Aim This study protocol aims to present a feasibility study of the intervention, ASSIST 1.0, a theory-based reablement programme, which includes coaching of home care staff and digitally based smart products, in a Swedish context. Methods and analysis This feasibility study will evaluate the perceived value and acceptability of ASSIST 1.0 intervention programme regarding fidelity, reach and dose, and potential outcomes by using a pretest and post-test design involving an intervention group and a control group (n=30) of older persons living at home, needing home care services. Qualitative interviews with home care staff delivering ASSIST and the older adults receiving the intervention as well as their significant others will be conducted to explore aspects affecting the intervention. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional ethics board. The results of the feasibility study will form the base for refinement of the ASSIST programme and for the subsequent planning of a full-scale randomised controlled trial investigating the effect of the programme on a larger scale. Dissemination will include peer-reviewed publications and presentations at national and international conferences as well as information to involved stakeholders.

  • 11. Bharosa, Nitesh
    et al.
    Janssen, Marijn
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology.
    Brave, Fritjof
    Designing and evaluating for Multi-agency Crisis Preparation: A Living Lab2010In: Proceedings of electronic government: 9th International conference, Berlin, Germany, 2010, p. 180-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public organizations show growing interest in the development of dashboards that aid relief agency managers in crisis preparation. Yet, there is a dearth of research on the development of such dashboards. This paper discusses the experiences gained from apioneering Living Lab on the development and evaluation of dashboards for assessingcrisis preparedness. In order to evaluate and further improve dashboards, a two-day user-centered gaming simulation was organized with forty relief agency managers. Asurvey distributed amongst the managers indicates that they were satisfied with the dashboards and intend to use these in practice. However, the managers suggested that the formulation and clustering of the performance indicators requires better alignment with the context of use. One of the main findings is that the high level of uncertainty regarding the final set of performance indicators and the corresponding norms demands flexibility in the dashboard architecture beyond the evaluation stage.

  • 12. Bharosa, Nitesh
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Janssen, Marijn
    Brave, Fritjof
    Are we prepared?: Experiences from developing dashboards for disaster preparation2010In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM2010), Seattle, USA, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relief agency managers show growing interest in dashboards for assessing multi-agency disaster preparedness. Yet, there is a dearth of research on the development and use of dashboards for disaster preparation. Consequently, information system architects in the disaster management domain have little guidance in developing dashboards. Here, dashboards refer to digitalized visualizations of performance indicators. In this paper, we discuss the experiences gained from an action research project on the development of dashboards for assessing disaster preparedness. The objective of this paper is to discuss experiences and tradeoffs extracted from the development of dashboards in practice. We organized a two-day gaming-simulation with relief agency managers for the evaluation of the dashboards. While the relief agency managers acknowledged the usefulness of dashboards in the disaster preparation process and expressed their intention to use these in practice, they suggested that the formulation and clustering of performance indicators requires further research.

  • 13. Den Hengst, Marielle
    et al.
    Bekebrede, Geertje
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Training Adjunct Commissionaires of Police in an Open Simulation: Methodological Challenges from a Politically Sensitive Case2012In: Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, ISSN 1752-4512, E-ISSN 1752-4520Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Flötteröd, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming simulations with environmental trajectories that maximize information gain2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), IEEE , 2012, p. 6465068-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulations put real actors in simulated environments. Example applications are training and scenario analysis in transport operations and disaster management. Running a single gaming simulation is an expensive endeavor and therefore must be led through interesting scenario configurations to maximize the learning or research outcomes. This article presents an approach to automatically control the simulated environment in account for the real players' behavior such that a maximum usability of the session is ensured. The approach accesses elements from discrete choice theory and provides the game designer with different options to tailor the type of learning. An archetypical application demonstrates the usefulness of the approach.

  • 15.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH. BIBA, Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik an der Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Carretero, Ramos Miguel
    KTH.
    Kodjabachian, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Duqueroie, B.
    Protoworld: a simulation based gaming environment to model and plan urban mobility2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 393-400Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will offer the participants the opportunity to explore and test a gaming environment integrating simulation data from different sources. The participants will model and play different mobility options for five European cities. The ProtoWorld solution integrates different simulations and street maps in Unity and allows a playful experience in urban mobility planning. The software will be available for the participants also after the workshop for further experimentation.

  • 16. Hellström Karlsson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Aiding Remote Diagnosis with Text Mining2018In: Proceedings of the 31st International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, FLAIRS 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the increase of digital healthcare providers, theinterest in diagnostic aids for remote diagnosis has increasedas well. As patients write about their symptoms themselves,we have access to a type of data which previously was rarelyrecorded, and which has not been filtered by a healthcareprofessional. Knowledge of similar patients and similarsymptoms is beneficial for doctors to arrive at a diagnosis.Therefore, the remote diagnostic process could be aided bypresenting patient cases together with information aboutsimilar patients and their self-reported symptom descriptions.Apart from online diagnosis, such an aid could bebeneficial in many healthcare settings, such as long-distancevisits and knowledge gain from patient diaries.In this paper, we present the impact of aiding remote diagnosisby presenting clusters of similar symptoms, usingsymptom descriptions collected from a virtual visit applicationby the Swedish telemedicine provider KRY. Symptomdescriptions were represented using the bag-of-words modeland were then clustered using the k-means algorithm. Anexperiment was then conducted with 13 doctors, where patientcases were presented together with the most representativewords of the associated cluster, to measure howtheir work was impacted. Results indicated that it was usefulin more complicated cases, but also that future experimentswill require further instructions on how the information is tobe interpreted.

  • 17.
    Hlotova, Yevheniia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Netherlands.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Netherlands.
    Measuring Bus Drivers' Occupational Stress Under Changing Working Conditions2014In: Transportation Research Record, ISSN 0361-1981, E-ISSN 2169-4052, no 2415, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress is an immense problem in modern society; approximately half of all occupational illnesses are directly or indirectly related to stress. The work of a bus driver is typically associated with high stress levels that negatively influence individual well-being as well as workforce management. The current study examined the impact of newly proposed working conditions on bus drivers' occupational stress by monitoring heart rate and by collecting data on mental workload with a questionnaire in operational driving conditions. The main determinants of stress levels were identified through multiple regression analysis. Results indicated that bus drivers experienced considerably lower stress levels under a new control strategy that shifts the performance objective from schedule adherence to service regularity. Higher stress levels were recorded during extreme weather conditions and peak hours and among inexperienced drivers. The measurements were performed with low-cost sports devices that can easily be used by practitioners.

  • 18.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Jonker, Catholijn
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Verwaart, Tim
    Wageningen University and Research.
    Modelling Trade and Trust across Cultures2006In: TRUST MANAGEMENT, PROCEEDINGS  , Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2006, Vol. 3986, no 1, p. 120-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Misunderstandings arise in international trade due to difference in cultural background of trade partners. Trust and the role it plays in trade are influenced by culture. Considering that trade always involves working on the relationship with the trade partner, understanding the behaviour of the other is of the essence. This paper proposes to involve cultural dimensions in the modelling of trust in trade situations. A case study is presented to show a conceptualisation of trust with respect to the cultural dimension of performance orientation versus cooperation orientation.

  • 19.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Kramer, Mark
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Wijdemans, Jeroen
    Information Technology, Wageningen University.
    A Chain Game for distributed trading and negotiation2001In: Experimental Learning in Industrial Management: Transference & Creation of Knowledge: 6th International Workshop on Simulation Gaming in Production Management / [ed] Juan Cano, Zaragoza University , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Kramer, Mark
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Wijdemans, Jeroen
    Information Technology, Wageningen University.
    A chain game for distributed trading and negotiation2003In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 111-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Wageningen University.
    Meijer, SebastiaanWageningen University.Smeds, RiittaAalto University.Riis, Jens OveAalborg University.
    Proceedings of the 8th International workshop on experimental learning in chains and networks2004Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Jonker, Catholijn
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen UR, Den Haag, Netherlands.
    Tykhonov, Dmytro
    Delft University of Technology.
    Verwaart, Tim
    Wageningen University and Research.
    Multi-agent Model of Trust in a Human Game2006In: Lecture notes in economics and mathematical systems, ISSN 0075-8442, E-ISSN 2196-9957, Vol. 564, no 3, p. 91-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individual-level trust is formalized within the context of a multi-agent system that models human behaviour with respect to trust in the Trust and Tracing game. This is a trade game on commodity supply chains and networks, designed as a research tool and to be played by human players. The model of trust is characterised by its learning ability, its probabilistic nature, and how experience influences trust. The validity of the trust model is tested by comparing simulation results with aggregated results of human players. More specifically the simulations show the same effects as human plays on selected parameters like confidence, tracing cost, and the trust update coefficient on observable game statistics like number of cheats, traces, certificates, and guarantees.

  • 23. Kleiman, F.
    et al.
    Janssen, M.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH.
    Serious gaming for developing open government data policies by local governments2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 702-703Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing open government by local government is cumbersome. Many local governments have no policies or are struggling to develop policies enabling to create value from open data. Policy-making is challenging due to the wicked nature of many policy problems, unclear objectives, and the involvement of diverse stakeholders. At the same time governments are opening their policy-making processes for participation by citizens and private companies. The goal of this paper is to present the structure of a game to increase the understanding of open-data policies by local governments. Open Data Policies are aimed at making public data available to be accessed and used by civil society. The game participants can experience the implications of various policies. This should help them to developed better policies.

  • 24.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Ind Engn & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamification of a Procurement Process for Professional Training of Public Servants2019In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation and training about changes in a procurement process are complex due to the complexity of the procurement process characterised by the adaptive stakeholder network and continuously changing market rules. Traditional training approaches for procurement split the process into separate steps; however, to be able to assess all training aspects, it is important to have a holistic look at procurement. This work explores how well gamification can address the complexity of the procurement process for training specialists in the road construction sector. A case study is carried out to train new business models for both experienced specialists and new employees. The steps for the development of gamification for training in procurement are shown. A comparison of results from experienced and less experienced participants is presented. The results show the relationships amongst the complexity of the real system, the gamification design and the results of gamification.

  • 25.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamifying Project Procurement to Incorporate Better Goals of Organizations in the Public Sector: A participatory simulation approach on a Swedish road construction use case2019In: Operations Research PerspectivesArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governmental institutions need to ensure work of infrastructures, and in most cases, it is done using project procurement process. Such processes have highly complex and dynamic interaction. It leads to issues, such as information asymmetry, over-specified tenders, not efficient feedback loops, etc. As result, projects can rarely match objectives of organizations. This paper explores the use of participatory simulation to help holistically investigate a project procurement process. Based on case studies from the Swedish road construction field, it can be concluded, that a participatory simulation is an effective approach to experiment with the effects of project procurement.

  • 26.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulation Validation: Matching Participants’ Worldviews with Their Decisions2019In: ISAGA 2018, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation is a successful approach to many issues where a holistic view is important. However, to use results from gaming simulations, the game has to be validated. This paper proposes a two-step approach for process validation of behavior for the gaming simulation by comparing decisions that players make in a game with the perceptions that affect their real-life decisions. Two case studies, where this approach was applied, are presented and the results are analyzed and discussed. A strong correlation between behavior during the games and in the real world was observed. This correlation indicates that gaming simulations in these cases are validated and represent the real system in an accu-rate manner. Thus, these cases show that the proposed approach works and can be used for validation of gaming simulations.

  • 27.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Hauge, Jannicke Baalsrud
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Perceptions of stakeholders in project procurement for road construction2018In: Cogent Business and Management, ISSN 2331-1975, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1520447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning transport system, building, operating and maintaining public roads and railways is typically performed by public institutions in collaboration with other stakeholders, such as manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. In many cases, this collaboration is done with a procurement process. Despite the formal nature of such process, stakeholders can have different worldviews or perceptions leading to adverse effects on the final procurement result. This article is focused on how to find perceptions of stakeholders related to roadwork-related procurement processes using Q methodology. This methodology uses data from the stakeholders and searches for factors or groups within the data of participants who have similar opinions. A specific case of road procurement in Sweden is used to test the methodology. As a result, three clusters of perceptions are found. These clusters and their interpretation can be applied to many tasks that are related to complex adaptive systems such as policy-making, strategy generation, solution testing, training and others.

  • 28.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Using Q Methodology for Developing a System Dynamics Model: A Case Study of Modelling Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of strategic and dynamic behaviour in real-world systems is paramount, especially when we consider the large technical infrastructures that make society work. Modelling social aspects are complicated because they are usually not well defined and can highly depend on individuals. This paper proposes and describes a framework on how to combine system dynamics and Q methodology to better understand complex systems. The proposed framework is the tool to work with systems where connections can be explained only by subjective opinions, and it gives opportunities to simulate sociotechnical systems, where social behaviour cannot be described with observation data.

  • 29.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A Research Agenda for Green Procurement of Infrastructures2014In: 2014 International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation: Engineering Responsible Innovation in Products and Services, ICE 2014, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 6871604-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction and maintenance of road infrastructure is a major source of emissions and energy usage. Procuring green roads, however, is neither commonplace nor trivial to implement. New ways to enhance the green procurement of roads are therefore needed, and can potentially involve life cycle assessment and green labelling methods. Considering the complexity of the pavement industry sector with its many actors and structures, implementing such innovations in the procurement process is surrounded with a series of uncertainties. The current paper formulates a research agenda for green procurement of roads by looking into potential mechanisms for future procurement. Given the objective of green procurement, the paper is focusing on the question what are the short term and long term effects of potential combinations of life cycle assessment principles and procurement process structures on infrastructure costs, risks, environmental impact and the structure of the road sector. Six different approaches are presented and reviewed for relevant earlier work in the literature. Based upon the complexities found, the authors discuss the challenges in finding a matching single research method. A solution is proposed for a holistic approach using gaming simulation, since it allows evaluating the procurement of infrastructure as a complex adaptive system.

  • 30.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Developing a System Dynamics Model from Perceptions: A Case Study of Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a public organisation, road administrations have the responsibility to improve the road construction process. However, the changes in such process involve a number of the stakeholders, who have different perceptions about what is most important in the road construction process. Perspectives on the necessity and nature of change will differ too. In order to provide an environment in which the potential consequences of changes in procurement can be tested, it is important to develop a model that simulates the process, especially the social part of the system. To achieve this, the model requires perceptions of stakeholders. The paper presents a new framework that obtains worldviews of the stakeholders in the complex adaptive system and transforms them into a System Dynamics model. As a result, a computational model is developed to observe the behaviour of stakeholders in the system. The model can become a tool for testing policies in the complex adaptive system.

  • 31.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Perspectives of Stakeholders on Road Procurements: In search of Procurement Aspects using Q Methodology2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays much emphasis is given to innovative procurement in the road construction sector. However, typical discussions about it do not focus on all the stakeholders involved in the process and all aspects. However, one cannot forget that procurement is a complex system, and everyone’s perspective is important for success. This paper looks at the worldviews of stakeholders in the road construction industry. The Q methodology is used to analyse the subjectivity of the worldviews. As a result, it is possible to look deeper into the perspectives and to see what each stakeholder sees as most important, and also to compare different worldviews among stakeholders.

  • 32. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Measuring group situation awareness in a multiactor gaming simulation: A pilot study of railway and passenger traffic operators2013In: Proc Hum Factors Ergon Soc, 2013, p. 177-181Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides initial results for the gaming simulation design and measurement of group situation awareness (SA) through a low-tech multi-actor board gaming simulation for the Dutch railway operation. Group situation awareness is measured in this study, as railway operations consist of many dyadic teams and predominantly unique roles. Gaming simulations are herein defined as a simulation of a system using gaming methods, in which humans take part. This particular type of gaming simulation provides a relative fast and low-cost alternative to measure situation awareness in a multi-actor environment compared to the traditional human-in-the-loop-like simulator environment for SA measurements. However, due to variations in their abstraction level, exploration is needed on the validity for measurements of situation awareness in these environments. Thus, the main aim in this study is to determine whether, and if so, how, group SA can be measured in gaming simulations up to a quality that provides significant data for research. The results show potential for SA measurements in low-tech board gaming simulations, although improvement is needed with regards to the different validity types for gaming simulation. This may be achieved through the explicit use of gaming simulation design principles for SA. Future work should focus on further validation and research on the theoretical implications of group situation awareness.

  • 33. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming simulation design for individual and team situation awareness2014In: Frontiers in Gaming Simulation: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Stockholm, Sweden, June 24-28, 2013. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 121-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Situation awareness is a key concept in understanding operator behaviour. Shortly, it can be described as knowing what is going on. For the past decades, human-in-the-loop simulators have been the traditional type of gaming simulations for studying or training situation awareness. The overall characteristic of gaming simulations is that they are a simulation of a system using gaming methods in which humans take part. Depending on a range of design choices, these gaming simulations take upon different visualizations and approaches to simulate aspects of the real world. Thus, a fundamental question is: what are the minimal requirements of a game to ensure natural levels of (team) situation awareness? This paper aims to capture and define the boundaries and limitations of gaming simulation design, in which the situation awareness of individuals and teams can be simulated and measured.

  • 34. Lo, J. C.
    et al.
    Sehic, E.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Explicit or implicit situation awareness?: Situation awareness measurements of train traffic controllers in a monitoring mode2014In: 11th International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, EPCE 2014, Held as Part of 16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2014, 2014, Vol. 8532 LNAI, p. 511-521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Railway traffic control faces the challenge of ensuring a high infrastructure capacity to maintain a constant train traffic flow. The current study assesses the situation awareness (SA), as a predictor of decision-making, of train traffic controllers to gain novel insights in their cognition. This study puts emphasis on levels of implicit and explicit situation awareness in a monitoring mode, through measures of SAGAT, MARS and performance. A human-in-the-loop simulator, called the PRL game is used to simulate the workspace of train traffic controllers. Initial findings indicate rather low levels of explicit SA, on the contrary to higher subjective SA scores through MARS and observer ratings, and a high performance on the punctuality and unplanned stops of trains.

  • 35.
    Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Fac Techol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Situation Awareness Measurement Techniques for Gaming Simulations: An Overview and Application for Railway Traffic Controllers2013In: 2013 IEEE INTERNATIONAL MULTI-DISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE ON COGNITIVE METHODS IN SITUATION AWARENESS AND DECISION SUPPORT (COGSIMA), IEEE , 2013, p. 238-245Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an extended gaming simulation framework and methods overview for the selection and development of situation awareness (SA) measurement techniques in gaming simulations. Gaming simulations are here defined as a simulation of a system through the use of gaming methods. Unlike SA measurements in human-in-the-loop simulators like cockpits, measurements for situation awareness in multi-actor gaming simulation environments are little investigated as a methodological approach. The aim of the framework is to bridge the gap between the theoretical implications of gaming simulations design elements and SA measurement techniques. Secondly, to provide key elements in game design and evaluation for the development of situation awareness measurement techniques. The framework is applied to determine a set of situation awareness measurement techniques for Dutch railway traffic controllers, in which the Dutch railway sector is increasingly using gaming simulation methods to investigate influences of new innovations for the railway system before innovations are put into the operations. Different sets of situation awareness measurement techniques for individuals and team/groups in railway traffic control are selected.

  • 36. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Pluyter, Kari R.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Individual Markers of Resilience in Train Traffic Control: The Role of Operators' Goals and Strategic Mental Models and Implications for Variation, Expertise, and Performance2016In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 80-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual markers of resilience and obtain quantitative insights into the understanding and the implications of variation and expertise levels in train traffic operators' goals and strategic mental models and their impact on performance. Background: The Dutch railways are one of the world's most heavy utilized railway networks and have been identified to be weak in system and organizational resilience. Method: Twenty-two train traffic controllers enacted two scenarios in a human-in-the-loop simulator. Their experience, goals, strategic mental models, and performance were assessed through questionnaires and simulator logs. Goals were operationalized through performance indicators and strategic mental models through train completion strategies. Results: A variation was found between operators for both self-reported primary performance indicators and completion strategies. Further, the primary goal of only 14% of the operators reflected the primary organizational goal (i.e., arrival punctuality). An incongruence was also found between train traffic controllers' self-reported performance indicators and objective performance in a more disrupted condition. The level of experience tends to affect performance differently. Conclusion: There is a gap between primary organizational goals and preferred individual goals. Further, the relative strong diversity in primary operator goals and strategic mental models indicates weak resilience at the individual level. Application: With recent and upcoming large-scale changes throughout the sociotechnical space of the railway infrastructure organization, the findings are useful to facilitate future railway traffic control and the development of a resilient system.

  • 37. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Brookhuis, Karel A.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Explicit or implicit situation awareness?: Measuring the situation awareness of train traffic controllers2016In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 43, p. 325-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on situation awareness (SA) predominantly focused on its explicit, reasoned, conscious features rather than on the implicit, intuitive, unconscious aspects that are often identified with expert operators. This research investigated implicit levels of SA of train traffic controllers (TTCs) in order to contribute to the body of knowledge on rail human factors research and SA. A novel approach was used to uncover levels of implicit SA through a set of three analyses: (1) fairly low SAGAT values with correlations between SAGAT scores and multiple performance indicators; (2) negative correlations between work experience and SAGAT scores; and (3) structurally lower level-1 SA (perception) scores in comparison to level-2 SA (comprehension) scores in accordance with Endsley's three-level model. Two studies were conducted: A pilot study which focused on SA measurements with TTCs in a monitoring mode (N = 9) and the main study, which involved TTCs from another control center (N = 20) and three different disrupted conditions. In the pilot study, SA was measured through the situation-awareness global assessment technique (SAGAT), perceived SA and observed SA, and performance was measured through punctuality and unplanned stops of trains before red signals. In the main study, SA was measured through SAGAT, and perceived SA and multiple performance indicators, such as arrival and departure punctuality and platform consistency, were assessed. In both studies, the set of three analyses showed consistent and persistent indications of the presence of implicit SA. Endsley's three-level model and related SAGAT method can be constrained by the presence of these intuitive, unconscious processes and inconsistent findings on correlations between SAGAT scores and performance. These findings provide insights into the SA of TTCs in the Netherlands and can support the development of training programs and/or the design of a new traffic management system.

  • 38. Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Measuring Mental Workload With Low-Cost and Wearable Sensors: Insights Into the Accuracy, Obtrusiveness, and Research Usability of Three Instruments2017In: Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, ISSN 1555-3434, E-ISSN 2169-5032, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 323-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The affordability of wearable psychophysiological sensors has led to opportunities to measure the mental workload of operators in complex sociotechnical systems in ways that are more objective and less obtrusive. This study primarily focuses on the sensors themselves by investigating low-cost and wearable sensors in terms of their accuracy, obtrusiveness, and usability for research purposes. Two sensors were assessed on their accuracy as tools to measure mental workload through heart rate variability (HRV): the E3 from Empatica and the emWave Pro from HeartMath. The BioPatch from Zephyr Technology, which is an U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved device, was used as a gold standard to compare the data obtained from the other 2 devices regarding their accuracy on HRV. Linear dependencies for 6 of 10 HRV parameters were found between the emWave and BioPatch data and for 1 of 10 for the E3 sensor. In terms of research usability, both the E3 and the BioPatch had difficulty acquiring either sufficiently high data recording confidence values or normal distributions. However, the BioPatch output files do not require postprocessing, which reduces costs and effort in the analysis stage. None of the sensors was perceived as obtrusive by the participants.

  • 39.
    Lo, Julia C.
    et al.
    ProRail, Dept Innovat & Dev, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sehic, Emdzad
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands.
    Balancing organizational and academic research: Investigating train affic Controller's geographical workspace design and team situation areness using gaming simulations2019In: Journal of Rail Transport Planning & Management, ISSN 2210-9706, E-ISSN 2210-9714, Vol. 10, p. 34-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In innovating and designing new concepts in the railway sector, the tch railway infrastructure manager ProRail uses different types of mulations to identify and tackle possible bottlenecks in future frastructure design. Computer simulation tools are used in earlier ages of the design process, followed by the application of gaming mulations where the design is fine tuned together with railway traffic erators before it is put into operation. This study focuses on oviding insights into the use of a human-in-the-loop simulator in ich an organizational research question investigates the impact of ltiple geographical workspace designs, while in parallel human factors search is conducted to investigate the concept of team situation areness from an academic research interest. Finding a balance between e practical and academic implications in one research design and its ndings does not rely on a trivial approach. The current article aims contribute on several levels: (1) to illustrate the balance between search for practice and research for academia through the applications gaming simulations; (2) to illustrate the use of gaming simulations r railway traffic operations and (3) to provide insights in team SA velopment in railway traffic operations using gaming simulations.

  • 40. Lo, Julia
    et al.
    Van den Hoogen, Jop
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Using gaming simulation experiments to test railway innovations: Implications for validity2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference - Simulation: Making Decisions in a Complex World, WSC 2013, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 1766-1777Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation in the railway sector often uses the same conceptual model as in computer simulation, and enables operators to interact with this model during a simulation run. Therefore, gaming simulation validation poses different challenges. This paper aims to answer the question to what extent gaming simulation can be used as an experimental research setting, due to its loosely demarcated experimental features. Focusing on validity issues, we study five cases in which the Dutch railway sector used gaming simulation to test innovations in a controlled environment. The results show that in addition to traditional external validity issues, human game players inherently open up this controlled environment, bringing in many confounding variables. By signaling what the specific validity threats are, this paper strives to improve gaming simulation for testing innovations that tackle social and technical elements of a system.

  • 41. Lukosch, H.
    et al.
    Van Bussel, R.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A serious game design combining simulation and sandbox approaches2014In: Frontiers in Gaming Simulation: 44th International Simulation and Gaming Association Conference, ISAGA 2013 and 17th IFIP WG 5.7 Workshop on Experimental Interactive Learning in Industrial Management, Stockholm, Sweden, June 24-28, 2013. Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 52-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has proven the usefulness of serious gaming for learning and advancing motivation by a combination of visuals, audio, text, and entertaining elements. Nevertheless, a broadly accepted, practical instructional design approach to serious games does not yet exist, especially when focusing on vocational edu-cation. The authors introduce a new instructional design model developed for this massive field of education, and argue some advantages compared to other design approaches. The first application is presented in mechanics mechatronics edu-cation to illustrate the close match of timing and provision of information that the instructional design model prescribes and how this has been translated to a rigidly structured serious game design. The structured approach answers the learning needs of applicable knowledge within the target group. It combines advantages of gaming simulations related to the transfer of knowledge from and to the workplace with a sandbox approach, an integrated fun-part of the game, which is aiming at motivating the students in in the best possible way.

  • 42. Lukosch, Heide
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Van Bussel, Roy
    A Game Design Framework for vocational education2013In: Journal of Communication and Computer, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Serious gameshave provento be a useful instrument to engage learners and increase motivation. Nevertheless, a broadly accepted, practicalinstructional design approach to serious games does not exist. In this paper, we introduce the use of an instructional design model that has not been applied to serious games yet, and has some advantages comparedto other design approaches.We present the case ofmechanics mechatronics education to illustrate the close match with timing and role of knowledge and information that the instructional design modelprescribes and how thishas been translatedto a rigidlystructured game design.The structured approach answers the learning needs of applicable knowledge within the target group. It combines advantages of simulations with strengths of entertainment games to foster learner’s motivation in the best possible way. A prototype of the game will be evaluated along a well-respectedevaluation method withinan advanced test settingincluding test and control group.

  • 43. Lukosch, Heide
    et al.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Van Bussel, Roy
    A Game Design Framework for vocational education2012In: International Journal of Human and Social Sciences, ISSN 1307-8046, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Mannaerts, Aster
    et al.
    Van Daalen, Els
    van Luipen, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Supporting policy analysis in the Dutch rail sector using System Dynamics2013In: Proceedings of the System Dynamics conference 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a sizeable expected growth of demand for rail transport in the Netherlands in the coming decades, and limited resources for expansion of the rail network, intensified utilization of the infrastructure is to be expected. To adequately manage this growth, appropriate tools for policy analysis are needed. The possibilities and pitfalls of using System Dynamics for policy analysis in the Dutch rail system have been explored by performing a modelling study into the interrelations of modal split, mobility and operations using System Dynamics. Additional scrutiny is placed on the method, because of the unstructuredness of many problems in the rail sector, and decision-making in a network type environment. Results show that the reliability of infrastructure is a major component in the extent of delays. Furthermore, the effect of unreliability in a train trip and the characteristics of a car trip are important for the choice between train and car. Although classical policy analysis has proven to be possible, modelling the operational part of the system has proven challenging due to the spatial and discrete characteristics of parts of the system. Recommendations are given to improve the model and model use to better suit the unstructuredness of the problems.

  • 45.
    Meershoek, Cees
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology.
    Kortmann, Rens
    Delft University of Technology.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology.
    Subrahmanian, Eswaran
    Delft University of Technology.
    Verbraeck, Alexander
    Delft University of Technology.
    The Culture Driven Game Design Method: Adapting serious games to the players’ culture2013In: Integrating Cultures: Formal Models and Agent-Based Simulation / [ed] Dignum, V., Dignum, Frank, Ferber, J., Stratulat, T., Springer, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Players of serious games are culturally sensitive agents; by interacting with the game and other players they bring their own culture into the game. This can result in conflicting behaviour that hampers the players to reach the objectives of the game. It is therefore necessary that the design of the game architecture is adjusted to the players’ culture. Currently, game designers typically adjust serious games to their players’ culture by playtesting with their target group. However, since playtesting demands a lot of time, incurs high costs and may spoil the client’s first impression of the game, playtesting is not always possible or desirable. This chapter presents an alternative to playtesting which we call the Culture Driven Game Design Method. This method provides a tool to assess and represent the players’ culture as well as a set of guidelines to process this assessment and avoid conflicts between the players’ culture and the architecture of the game.

  • 46.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulations for Railways: Lessons Learned from Modeling Six Games for the Dutch Infrastructure Management2012In: Infrastructure Design, Signalling and Security in Railway / [ed] Xavier Perpinya, Rijeka: InTech, 2012, p. 275-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Introducing gaming simulation in the Dutch railways2012In: Transport Research Arena 2012 / [ed] Papaioannou, P, London, United Kingdom, 2012, p. 41-51Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in the Dutch railways in the domain of capacity management and traffic control is increasingly difficult to implement because of the large interconnectedness of all processes and separation into different institutions and organizations. Meanwhile there is a push for quality improvements leading to more robustness and resilience as well as a significant capacity increase. In the years 2009 - 2010, the gaming group of Delft University of Technology was asked to introduce gaming simulation methodology at ProRail, the Netherlands' rail infrastructure manager, to support innovation projects. Three initial trial projects ran so successful that the organization asked the Delft researchers to identify where in the organization large-scale implementation of gaming simulation methodology would be most promising. Based upon a series of interviews through the organization, ProRail and TU Delft jointly formulated a four-year research and implementation proposal that is now in operation. The first gaming session in this new collaboration proved the essence of the fit of gaming simulation for innovation at the Dutch railways. Unique for gaming simulation is the highly detailed simulation of both the more technical and process variables of rail infrastructures as the decision and communication function of real people in their real roles. The method does not assume models of decision-making but draws upon the real-world knowledge of professionals in the operation. The paper gives lessons learned on methodological challenges resulting from the four projects described.

  • 48.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    Testing hypotheses using gaming simulation: qualitative and qualitative research in supply chains and networks2010In: Planspiele - Entwicklungen und Perspektiven: Rückblick auf den Deutschen Planspielpreis 2010 / [ed] Friedrich Trautwein, Norderstedt , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Wageningen University.
    The impact of the netchain laboratory: gaming for insight in netchains2004In: PhD-conference Mansholt Graduate School, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, 2 June 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Delft University of Technology, Delft, the Netherlands .
    The organisation of transactions: studying supply networks using gaming simulation2009Book (Other academic)
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