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  • 1.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brynielsson, Joel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Edlund, Lena
    Fallgren, Per
    Forsberg, Lars
    Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus
    Gustavii, Jonathan
    Herzing, Mathias
    Häckner, Jonas
    Jacobsson, Adam
    Jacobsson, Eva-Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Källmén, Håkan
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Muren, Astri
    Sjöberg, Eric
    Thuresson, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tjörnhammar, Edward
    Wickström, Hans
    Effektiv miljötillsyn: Slutrapport2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Målsättningen har varit att ta fram ny kunskap inom miljötillsynen och därigenom uppnå en effektivare miljötillsyn samt att få in nya vetenskapliga perspektiv på miljötillsyn.

    I rapporten studeras metoder för inspektioner och det kommunikativa samspelet mellan inspektören och företrädare för den verksamhet som inspekteras, hur den institutionella ramen för inspektionsprocessen fungerar samt visar på möjligheter att mäta effekterna av inspektioner och tillsyn.

    Naturvårdsverket kommer att ha resultatet som ett kunskapsunderlag i fortsatt arbete med tillsynsvägledning och utveckling av hur tillsyn och tillsynsvägledning kan följas upp och utvärderas.

  • 2.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Intention-Centred Design Education: Beyond Methods and Techniques2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå Institute of Design , 2014, p. 1157-1167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design work can be driven from a variety of intentions, e.g. to serve users, to generate profit, to explore a new concept, or to trigger reflection and debate. However, it is not always clear how such intentions can be addressed concretely in education, and in specific design domains, such as interaction design, they might easily get lost among course content related to specific methods and technologies. In this paper, we discuss how we have addressed design intentions in our advanced course in interaction design, and also what we see as its main qualities in relation to more conventional course structure in this area.

  • 3.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Practicing Design Judgement through Intention-Focused Course Curricula2015In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on how design judgement can be practiced in design education, as explored in several iterations of an advanced course in interaction design. The students were probed to address four separate design tasks based on distinct high-level intentions, i.e. to 1) take societal responsibility, 2) to generate profit, 3) to explore a new concept, and 4) to trigger reflection and debate. This structure, we found, served as a valuable tool in our context for bringing important topics to discussion in class and for actively practicing design judgement. We discuss what we see as the main qualities of this approach in relation to more conventional course structures in this area, with a focus directed more towards aspects of methodology, specific interaction techniques, and design principles more generally.

  • 4.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Vallgårda, A.
    John Tharakan, M.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Touch and feel soft hardware2012In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, TEI 2012, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 359-362Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With soft hardware we refer to electronic components, coatings, and shells built from materials that make them elastic, flexible, floppy and malleable. By introducing new material properties into electronic and computational contexts we expect to open new paths for designing interactive things. Building electronics with textile and other soft materials may easily degrade elements such as speed, power, and storage capacities; however, these constraints can be acceptable if not down right desirable in these new contexts. We see how sensors, actuators, computers and even battery cells made of soft materials enables us to embed them into soft shapes that in turn afford certain forms of interaction. With the term soft hardware, we also highlight the interplay between computational and physical materials in interaction designs.

  • 5.
    Lou, Yi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gaming at work to save energy - Supporting behavioural change of occupants through cooperative games2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH - Royal Institute of Technology.
    Designing Energy-Sensitive Interactions: Conceptualising Energy from the Perspective of Electric Cars2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As technology is increasingly used in mobile settings, energy and battery management is becoming a part of everyday life. Many have experienced how quickly a battery can be depleted in a smartphone, laptop or electric cars, sometimes causing much distress. An important question is how we can understand and work with energy as a factor in interaction design to enable better experiences for end-users.

    Through design-oriented research, I have worked with the specific case of electric cars, which is currently a domain where people struggle in terms of energy management. The main issue in this use case is that current driving range estimates cause distrust and anxiety among drivers. Through sketches, prototypes and studies, I investigated causes as well as possible remedies to this situation. My conclusion is that instead of providing black-boxed predictions, in-car interfaces should expose the logics of estimates so that drivers know how their own actions in e.g. driving style, climate control, and other equipment, affects energy use. Revealing such energy mechanisms will not only empower the driver, it will also acknowledge the impact of variables that cannot be predicted automatically.

    In this work, understanding the dynamic aspects of energy has emerged as central to interaction with systems. This points to a need to design energy sensitive interactions - focusing on supporting users to find the right balance between energy use and the experiential values sought for. To ease design of energy sensitive interactions, energy use is divided into three different categories with accompanying ideals. These are exergy (always needed to achieve the required interaction), intergy (controllable and changing over time and use, needs to be addressed in design), and anergy (always waste that needs to be reduced). This articulation highlights aspects of energy that are specific to interaction design, and possible aspects to expose to allow more energy-efficient interactions in use. 

  • 7.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Differentiated driving range: Exploring a solution to the problems with the "guess-o-meter" in electric cars2014In: AutomotiveUI 2014 - 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, in Cooperation with ACM SIGCHI - Proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric cars may be an important alternative to combustion engine cars in the process towards a more sustainable transportation system. However, the short and varying driving range communicated by what has become known as the "guess-o-meter" on the dashboard of current electric car models is known to sometimes cause confusion for electric car drivers. In this paper, we analyze this issue and propose alternative solutions to the current way of presenting the remaining driving range to the driver. We do this by exploring a concept that we call differentiated driving range. The concept aims to reveal the relationship between factors related to driving and the estimated driving range. Starting from this concept we explore different ways of giving it a concrete form and eventually reach a fully testable interactive design. We believe that this is of interest to a wider audience and reflect on some issues with our current instantiation and directions for future work.

  • 8.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tactile Music Collaboration for Social Presence and Performance2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    COPE1 – Incorporating Coping Strategies into the Electric Vehicle Information System2012In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI '12) / [ed] ACM, ACM , 2012, p. 17-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sales of Electric vehicles (EVs) are estimated by the industry to increase in the future, as they are an important step towards more energy efficient transportation and to lower CO2 emissions. A problem is that available battery technologies for EVs limit the driving range and might cause range anxiety, and as technology stands now, this problem will be present for many years to come. As a result, it is important to re-design the electric vehicle information system (EVIS) to include tools that could easily help users overcome range anxiety issues. Design of such technology can take advantage of the experience accumulated by drivers who have already coped with this problem for many years. In this paper, we describe a coping strategy observed among some more experienced EV drivers, describe why this strategy is powerful, and demonstrate a first attempt to utilize it in design. 

  • 10.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing & Understanding the Impacts of Electric Vehicle Apps2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are in the process of designing a series of apps for plugin electric vehicles (PEVs) with the goals of raising technology understanding and mitigating range anxiety. We targeted our apps at different moments in the user-car relationship: before, during and after driving. We are designing a study involving a number of PEV drivers to both assess their driving behavior over time, and to test our PEV apps. This paper presents our process and current status, for workshop discussion.

  • 11.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Having a lead foot?: Exploring how to visualize energy consumption and driving in electric cars2014In: AutomotiveUI 2014 - 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, in Cooperation with ACM SIGCHI - Adjunct Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 111-114Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a visualization of estimated and real energy consumption while driving, as a tool to compare the driving to what might be considered "typical" driving. This is particularly relvant to cases where the driver wants to be aware of the energy consumption in order to reach a particular destination and avoid a "lead foot", or otherwise when learning to drive efficiently.

  • 12.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kis, Filip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olsson, I.
    Fahlén, L.
    Enough power to move: Dimensions for representing energy availability2012In: MobileHCI'12 - Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, ACM Digital Library, 2012, p. 201-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy and design of energy-feedback are becoming increasingly important in the mobile HCI community. Our application area concerns electric vehicles. We thus depart from home and workplace appliances and address range and energy anxiety caused by short driving distance capabilities and long charging times in mobile settings. While some research has been done on energy management of mobile devices, less has been done on mobility devices like electric vehicles. We explore this topic by letting conventional fuel car drivers reflect on their current driving habits through an exploration tool that we developed. Our results demonstrate three dimensions related to energy availability to consider for design of energy dependent mobility devices and provide explanations on how these dimensions could be utilize in our design through energy visualizations. With this we contributed not only by demonstrating aspects of energy availability and mobility, but also through opening up for new interesting possibilities and inquires in our and possibly other domains.

  • 13.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kis, Filip
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olsson, Ingvar
    Fahlen, Lennart
    SICS - Swedish Institute for Computer Science.
    EVERT: Energy Representations for Probing Electric Vehicle Practice2012In: Proceedings of the 2012 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '12, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 2141-2146Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy and design of energy-feedback are becoming increasingly important in the HCI community. Our application area concerns electric vehicles, we thus depart from home and workplace appliances and address range and energy anxiety caused by short driving distance capabilities and long charging times in mobile settings. We explore this topic by letting conventional fuel car drivers reflect on their current driving habits through an exploration tool that we use as a technology probe. Our preliminary results demonstrate the educational values of the energy representations in the tool, and we also identify a design tension for map-related energy representations.

  • 14.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exergy, Anergy, and Intergy: Uncovering Energy in InteractionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Electric Driving on the Edge: the Necessities of (Re)Planning, (Re)Assessment, and ReconfigurationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Getting to Know Electric Cars Through an App2015In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 289-296Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electric cars are a promising alternative to combustion engine cars to lower emissions and fossil fuel dependencies. However, many are skeptical to this unfamiliar technology and the limited driving range of these vehicles. Therefore, people disregard this option without properly knowing if it is a good practical alternative. This is unfortunate, as electric cars according to studies should cover most people’s needs. In this paper, we will share our results from a real-world study where 8 participants used an app designed to simulate the battery of electric cars using a regular combustion engine car. In this way it is intended to let people assess their real needs in their real context. Our results show that this might be an effective tool to overcome psychological barriers associated with electric cars, as they do not only assess electric cars and infrastructure, but also their own needs and habits. We also suggest a shift from a kWh and bar perspective to a percentage-perspective as our users easily could work with percentage to figure out the driving range and plan ahead. Our study also elevated a number of uncertainties causing unnecessary worries among our participants.

  • 17.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Developing a framework for evaluating the sustainability of computing projects2017In: LIMITS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 Workshop on Computing Within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 111-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toyama [19] has proposed a "preliminary taxonomy" for classifying computing projects as a way of separating sustainable computing efforts from unsustainable ones. In this paper we explore the feasibility of Toyama's taxonomy. We begin by describing how we revised and developed his taxonomy to make it more practically useful and then conducted a pilot study where we used the revised version to evaluate four computing projects. The pilot study was then used as a foundation for further discussing and developing the revised taxonomy into yet another, third and final version which we have chosen to call the Sustainable Computing Evaluation Framework (SCEF). While our proposed framework (SCEF) is more practically useful than Toyama's "preliminary taxonomy", there are still challenges that need to be addressed and we end the paper by suggesting where future efforts could be focused.

  • 18. Osswald, S.
    et al.
    Schroeter, R.
    Loehmann, S.
    Butz, A.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lienkamp, M.
    EVIS 2014: 3rd Workshop on Electric Vehicle Information Systems2014In: AutomotiveUI 2014 - 6th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, in Cooperation with ACM SIGCHI - Adjunct Proceedings, 2014, p. 93-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effort to push the electric vehicle development worldwide is continuously rising. Production sites for electric vehicle components are built, billions are invested to create new battery electric vehicle concepts (BEV) and new players are entering the market. The information systems of electric vehicles (EVIS) need to cope with a variety of new features that are related to changes of vehicle components and driving behavior, but also with changes and new systems that are silently introduced into the vehicles. Sustainability, mobility concepts and smart mobility are just a few points out of many that can be attributed to the "silent" category. With this workshop, we continue to bring together researchers, designers and practitioners to explore the related field and generate a state of the art perspective on EVIS.

  • 19.
    Paloranta, Jimmie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

  • 20.
    Shafqat, Omar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Rosberg, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Per-appliance energy feedback as a moving target2019In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, CEUR-WS , 2019, Vol. 2382Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy feedback through interactive technologies is often proposed as a major approach to reduce household energy consumption and carbon footprint. However, this vision is challenged by critics. This paper seeks to inform this debate through a case study of an advanced energy feedback device providing runtime and de-aggregated per-appliance feedback through a smartphone app. This study, based on 15 contextual interviews, aims to investigate how users understand and act on the various levels of feedback received from the device and the resulting impact on user behaviour. We found that appliance detection can be a “moving target” that hampers the intended aims of energy feedback, as it reduces user understanding of the technology. The lack of understanding was further deepened by unrelated supplementary functionality added in the package, in the form of smart plugs. Despite gaining a better understanding of their energy consumption, the users felt limited in terms of their ability to change their behaviour considerably.

  • 21.
    Sidenmark, Ludvig
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gaze Behaviour on Interacted Objects during Hand Interaction in Virtual Reality for Eye Tracking Re-calibration2019In: Eye Tracking Research and Applications Symposium (ETRA), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id a6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the probability and timing of attaining gaze fxations on interacted objects during hand interaction in virtual reality, with the main purpose for implicit and continuous eye tracking re-calibration. We conducted an evaluation with 15 participants in which their gaze was recorded while interacting with virtual objects. The data was analysed to fnd factors infuenc-ing the probability of fxations at diferent phases of interaction for diferent object types. The results indicate that 1) interacting with stationary objects may be favourable in attaining fxations to moving objects, 2) prolonged and precision-demanding interactions positively infuences the probability to attain fxations, 3) performing multiple interactions simultaneously can negatively impact the probability of fxations, and 4) feedback can initiate and end fxations on objects.

  • 22.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, AndersKTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Synesthetic Experience in S T R A T I C2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we humanize digital interactive technology? One way is through our experience with technology. With S T R A T I C we present several post-digital concepts to discuss the relationship of the digital in regard to our human lives. We emphasize the synesthetic experience along with other aesthetic experiences and materiality issues with manifestations of the digital in the physical world, tangible approaches to sonic performances, or exposure of internal logics of technological processes.

    In this paper, we propose both exhibiting our work as an art installation and via a live performance. We regard it as being highly relevant to the topic of the TEI Arts Track exhibition: post-digital materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital, and to its tangible aspects. 

  • 23.
    Simbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Synesthetic Experience in STRATIC2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 574-580Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we humanize digital interactive technology? One way is through our experience with technology. With S T R A T I C we present several post-digital concepts to discuss the relationship of the digital in regard to our human lives. We emphasize the synesthetic experience along with other aesthetic experiences and materiality issues with manifestations of the digital in the physical world, tangible approaches to sonic performances, or exposure of internal logics of technological processes. In this paper, we propose both exhibiting our work as an art installation and via a live performance. We regard it as being highly relevant to the topic of the TEI Arts Track exhibition: post-digital materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital, and to its tangible aspects.

  • 24.
    Simbelis, Vygandas Vegas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    STRATIC: Performing the Sampling Rate2015In: 12TH ADVANCES IN COMPUTER ENTERTAINMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (ACE15), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through our audio-visual project, STRATIC, we explore a particular technique the sampling rate, which refers to the visual appearance of line patterns. The connection of the audio and the visual is at the core and the project explores it through the visual-music technique. The STRATIC is using hardware, which captures frequencies of the produced sounds and directly generates light. Then the light and a camera compose the responsive colorful line patterns, winch appear through the sampling rate phenomenon. The artist duo is playing synthesizers and by visually responding to the produced light patterns they perform live audio-visual performances. So the music is played in responding to the real-time visual appearances. The audio-visual performance is played in a real-time creates evocative, noisy and sometimes relaxing atmosphere. We propose to experience such audio-visual performance at the ACE 2015 Creative Showcase.

  • 25.
    Šimbelis, V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Synthesis in the audiovisual2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016, p. 301-304Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The S T R A T I C audiovisual project1 is based on the phenomenon that occurs when filming a pulsating light - lines appear on the screen. The thickness, color and movement of these lines are directly related to the frequency of the sound. In other words, the sound generates the visuals in real-time. The visuals are examined by the use of shutter speed and frame rate of a camera. In this project we explore the interactive potential through our live performances and the space for aesthetic expression by synthesizing the audio and the visuals. The project relates to the genre of visual music and abstraction in the arts and creates a synesthetic experience for the audience. We find it highly relevant to CHI since it concerns aspects of materiality at the intersection of the analog and the digital. 

  • 26.
    Šimbelis, Vygandas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Solsona, Jordi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Metaphone: Machine aesthetics meets interaction design2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through our art project, Metaphone, we explored a particular form of aesthetics referred to in the arts tradition as machine aesthetics. The Metaphone machine collects the participant's bio-data, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) and Heart Rate (HR), creating a process of movement, painting and sound. The machine behaves in machine-like, aesthetically evocative ways: A shaft on two large wheels rotates on the floor, carrying paint that is dripped onto a large sheet of aquarelle paper on the floor according to bio-sensor data. A soundscape rhythmically follows the bio-sensor data, but also has its own machine-like sounds. Six commentators were invited to interact with the machine. They reported a strangely relaxing atmosphere induced by the machine. Based on these experiences we discuss how different art styles can help to describe aesthetics in interaction design generally, and how machine aesthetics in particular can be used to create interesting, sustained, stylistically coherent interactions.

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