Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Daniel, Svensson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Per-Olof Åstrand: Fysiologen som förändrade träningen2013In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 1, p. 6-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    GIH:s 200-åriga historia rymmer naturligtvis många viktiga personer. En av de mest centrala är Per-Olof Åstrand. Hans insatser inom fysiologin har haft enorm betydelse för forskningen men också för idrotten. Åstrand var en av förgrundsgestalterna när träningen skulle rationaliseras och bli mer konditionsinriktad.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    An Even Colder War?: Specialization, Scientification and Gender in the Training Methods of Cross-Country Skiing from the 1950s2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cold War era was also an era of scientific and rational training methods in sports, especially in cross-country skiing. As competition hardened through the rise of Soviet and DDR skiers, other nations had to adapt. Sweden did so by changing training ideology, from natural to scientific training, in the early 1950s. By teaming up with physiologists, the Swedish Ski Federation wanted access to scientific, rational training to stay competitive. The methods proposed were not only interesting for sports, but also for military purposes. Some of the research was even funded by military organizations. The Cold War contributed in two ways to training – an increased military interest in training, as well as an increased competition in international cross-country skiing that resulted in an accelerated rationalization of training.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Changing Tracks: The Battle Between Natural and Scientific Training in Swedish Cross-Country Skiing, 1948-19722014In: Idrott, historia & samhälle, ISSN 0280-2775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Until the 1950s, Swedish cross-country skiers relied on natural training. But in the wake of failure at the 1952 Winter Olympics, the Swedish Ski Federation initiated a scientification of training. They sought aid from physiologists to “rationalize” the training of elite skiers. But the advocates of natural training resisted this new, scientific model. A battle was fought between the two sides, and a number of different power strategies were used by the federation and the physiologists to promote scientific training. In this article, the battle between different training regimes is analyzed using theories of power and sportification.

    The article concludes that the shift towards rational training during the period 1948-1972 was part of a larger rationalization of Swedish society. And the relative slowness of implementation was due to a lack of professionalization (of coaches). Rationalization should therefore be seen as one of the later stages of sportification. 

  • 4.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Fjällens rörelsearv: Hållbar fjällutveckling och lokal kunskap2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Go' känsla i fädrens spår?2014In: Tidningen Utemiljö, ISSN 1402-1307, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 40-41Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    How Much Sport is there in Sport Physiology?: Practice and Ideas in the Stockholm School of Physiology at GCI, 1941–19692013In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 892-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physiology research at the Royal Central Institute of Gymnastics (Swedish acronym: GCI) in Stockholm was never primarily focused on sports, but has made significant contributions to sport and exercise physiology. Changing ideas about the human body (from form to motor) during the early twentieth century led to criticism towards the posture-oriented Ling gymnastics. The rationalisation movement of the 1930s and onwards also paved the way for a rationalistic physiology research. GCI recruited Eric Hohwü Christensen (1904–1996) from Copenhagen for the new position as professor in physiology in 1941. Christensen built his research programme on the ideas of the Copenhagen School, focusing on basic research, bodily limits and rationalisation of exercise. The majority of research at GCI focused on basic physiology, and the main goal was to rationalise the exercise of the entire population, which was in line with the ambitions of the emerging Swedish welfare state.

    But applications in elite sports became a claim to fame for GCI through names such as Per-Olof Åstrand and Bengt Saltin. This article aims at showing how the research programme was outlined during Christensen’s professorship, 1941–1969. How does a scientific environment focused on basic, physiological research become famous for its impact in sports?

  • 7.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    I fäders spår?: Längdskidåkningens landskap som kulturarv2014In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 193-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the landscapes of skiing from a heritage and memory perspective. Are there certain landscapes of cross-country skiing that can be seen as a national and/or local heritage? What constitutes these landscapes and how are they portrayed in tourism and marketing today? By the analysis of three examples - Hindås, Vålådalen and Vasaloppet - this article investigates how history and landscape is used to market skiing and to attract (skiing) tourism. How is skiing constructed as cultural heritage and used for present day purposes? The three before-mentioned cases are compared with fourth, Landvetter, a place where cross-country skiing does not have the same historical connection. The conclusion is that ideas about landscapes of skiing unite Vasaloppet, Vålådalen and Hindås, even though the efforts and commercial effects may differ greatly. Another conclusion is that landscapes of skiing (or any sport) are cultural products, and best understood as a form of cultural heritage. Landscapes of sport are now being articulated as sites of cultural heritage, much resembling the articulation process of other previously neglected landscapes of industry, research, cities and other. This articulation implies a broadening of the cultural heritage, a process that risk being paralleled by a commercialization and devaluation of the increasingly inclusive heritage concept. But there are also more positive aspects. The inclusion of landscapes of movement in the cultural heritage can result in both protection and increased attraction, like in the case of the VasaloppsArena.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Kriserna driver på idrottens utveckling2014In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 1 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vinter-OS i Sotji blev en svensk succé, men ingen av medaljörerna lär vinna Vasaloppet i morgon. Skidåkare är mer specialiserade i dag än förr. Och synen på träning har förändrats radikalt under 1900-talet.

  • 9.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    När träningen blev rationell2015In: Vasalöparen, ISSN 0283-5533, no 3, p. 46-48Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Rational training: How basic physiology became scientific methods of exercise in cross-country skiing.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at showing how the research program of one of the world’s most prominent physiology centers, the Royal Central Institute of Gymnastics (GCI) in Stockholm, was outlined during Eric Hohwü Christensen’s (1904-96) professorship, 1941-1969. How does a scientific environment like GCI, focused on basic, physiological research become famous for its impact in sports? What purpose did the researchers have to pursue this direction? What ideas about the human body enabled and shaped this kind of research? How did this research find its way to the practitioners, and how was it received?

  • 11.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Rational training: Science and experience in the training of male and female skiers in the Swedish national team, 1954-19752013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When cross country skiing was established as a sport in the late 19th and early 20th century, it was a

    sport heavily dominated by men. Training was something that was done on spare time, but the main

    bulk of physical training was due to heavy physical work, from forestry or farming. In Sweden, forest workers were common on the national team well into the 1970s. Cross country skiing was tightly linked to rural areas, and gender coded as male (Sommestad 1992). Especially in Norway, women’s

    skiing was not easily accepted (Wigernaes 1967). Female skiers in Scandinavia were depicted very

    differently than their male colleagues (Tolvhed 2008). After poor results in international competitions in the early 1950s, the Swedish Ski Federation sought to improve performance of skiers by scientific means. They turned to physiologists at the Royal Central Institute of Gymnastics (GCI) in Stockholm. GCI had previously been the center for physical culture and Swedish gymnastics in Sweden, but had shifted towards a more scientific, rational approach to physical education and training (Svensson, 2013, Yttergren 2010). During the 1950s and 1960s, GCI physiologists like Per Olof Åstrand and Bengt Saltin were involved in testing and scientifically advising the national team (both men and women). Did the reception of scientific advice differ among male and female skiers? If so, how and why? Preliminary results suggest that female skiers, lacking the connection to forestry and long tradition in the sport, were more open to new training methods, while their male colleagues followed the tradition of training from predecessors and forestry. Female skiers, by adapting scientific advice more easily than male colleagues, may have functioned as change agents in the sport of cross country skiing. This indicates a strong connection between the (gendered) culture of a certain physical activity and the training conducted.

  • 12.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    "Rationell träning": Vetenskapliggörandet av träning för längdskidåkning2014In: SVIF-nytt, no 2, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Review of License to Jump! A Story of Women’s Ski Jumping2016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Review of  ‘Stadion and Zinkensdamm: Stockholms Sporting Public During Two Centuries’ (Mats Hellspong, Stockholmia förlag, 2013)2014In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, p. 168-169Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Review of Identities, Ethnicities, Histories and Sports in Northern Norway2017In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Scientizing performance in endurance sports: The emergence of ‘rational training’ in cross-country skiing, 1930-19802016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite athletes of today use specialized, scientific training methods and the increasing role of science in sports is undeniable. Scientific methods and equipment has even found its way into the practice of everyday exercisers, a testament to the impact of sport science. From the experiential, personal training regimes of the first half of the 20th century to the scientific training theories of the 1970s, the ideas about training and the athletic body shifted.

    The rationalization process started in endurance sports in the 1940s. It was part of a struggle between two models of training; natural training and rational training. Physiologists wanted to rid training of individual and local variations and create a universal model of rational, scientific training. The rationalization of training and training landscapes is here understood as an aspect of sportification, a theory commonly used to describe similar developments in sports where increasing regimentation, specialization and rationalization are among the main criteria. This dissertation adds the concept of technologies of sportification to explain the role that micro-technologies and practices (such as training logs, training camps and scientific tests) have in the scientization of training.

    This thesis thus sets out to analyze the role that science has played in training during the 20th century. It is a history about the rationalization of training, but also about larger issues regarding the role of personal, experiential knowledge and scientific knowledge. The main conclusions are that the process of scientization never managed to rid training of components from natural, experiential training, and that the effort by Swedish physiologists to introduce rational training was part of the larger rationalization movement at the time. In the end, training knowledge was a co-production between practitioners and theoreticians, skiers and scientists.  

  • 17.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Skiing and Science: Practice, Theory and Co-Production of Training Knowledge in Cross-Country Skiing since the 1950s2015In: ECSS Congress Malmö 2015: Sustainable Sport, Köln, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Elite endurance athletes of today use specialized, scientific training methods and the increasing role of science in sports is undeniable. This is especially true for cross-country skiing. But how and when did scientists and educated coaches gain power? Scientification of training methods in cross-country skiing accelerated in the 1950s and cross-country skiing was an early adopter, even if not all skiers were (Svensson 2013). Still, the experiential, local knowledge of skiers remain an important ingredient in modern day training. How have these different knowledge traditions merged? How has it changed training in theory and practice?

     

    Methods

    This paper analyzes how physiologists and skiers interacted in the transformation of training methods. Material from archives, interviews and previous research will be studied using theories of bio-power (Foucault 1998), sportification (Yttergren 2006, Guttmann 1978) and STS (Knorr-Cetina 1999, Latour 1987) Skiers from Sweden and Norway will be used as the main examples.

     

    Results and discussion

    Training methods were developed through meetings between practitioners and theoreticians. Scientification of training was driven by hardening international competition. The creation of “rational” training methods was a co-production of knowledge between different knowledge traditions, where skiers represented a traditional, local and tacit knowledge (Polanyi 1958), while scientists represented scientific, written knowledge with universal claims.

    In the co-production of knowledge about training, bodies were at the core. Ultimately it was a matter of control over bodies. Should they be subjected to bio-power (Foucault 1998, 2001) or should they remain under the control of the practitioner? The relationship between skier and scientist resembled that of patient and doctor. Interaction between the expert on the local level (skier /patient) and the universal level (physiologist/doctor) resulted in a knowledge-base that affected both practice and theory. Rational training, in the end, was not built only on science but also on the individual and collective experiences of elite skiers.

     

    References

    Foucault, M.(1998), The Will to Knowledge. The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1. New York: Penguin Books.

    Guttmann, A. (1978), From Ritual to Record. The Nature of Modern Sports. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Heggie, V. (2011), A History of British Sport Medicine. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

     

    Knorr Cetina, K. (1999), Epistemic Cultures: How the Sciences Make Knowledge. London: Harvard University Press.

    Latour, B. (1987), ‘Centers of Calculation’, in Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 215-257.

    Polanyi, M. (1958), Personal Knowledge. Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Svensson, D.(2013), ‘How Much Sport is there in Sport Physiology? Practice and Ideas in the Stockholm School of Physiology at GCI, 1941–1969’ in The International Journal of the History of Sport, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 892-913.

    Yttergren, L. (1996), Täflan är lifvet: idrottens organisering och sportifiering i Stockholm 1860-1898. Stockholm : Stockholmia.

  • 18.
    Svensson, Daniel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Technologies of sportification: Practice, Theory and Co-Production of Training Knowledge in Cross-Country Skiing Since the 1950s2016In: European Studies in Sports History, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elite athletes of today use specialized, scientific training methods and the increasing role of science in sports is undeniable. The scientization process started in endurance sports (e.g. Yttergren 2012, Bourne 2008, Krüger 2006, Svensson 2014, Heggie 2011, Johnson 2009), among them cross-country skiing. This article analyzes how Swedish physiologists and cross-country skiers interacted in the scientization of training methods, focusing on the technologies of sportification that were used. Examples of such technologies are scientific testing, training logs, training camps and training manuals. Material from archives, interviews and earlier research will be studied using theories of bio-power (Foucault 1998) and sportification (e.g. Yttergren 2006, Guttmann 1978). The article concludes that while technologies of sportification could not ensure a rapid rationalization of training methods, these technologies over time became standard features in the training and sportification of cross-country skiing.

  • 19.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Movement Heritage: Discrete Monuments and Sustainable Development in the Swedish Mountain Range2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Svensson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The Movement Heritage: Training, History and Sustainable Landscape Use2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Oppenheim, Florence
    Etta på bollen: Historien om Öxabäcks damlag2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Fotboll är världens största sport. Men bland allt det stora (pengar, arenor, turneringar) finns också något annat, viktigare. Idrottens själ, numera svårfunnen på de största arenorna. Fotbollens rötter finns ofta på mindre orter – som Öxabäck.

    I drygt 30 år var lilla Öxabäcks IF ett av Sveriges främsta damfotbollslag. Trots ett begränsat befolkningsunderlag, knappa ekonomiska resurser och konkurrens från betydligt större orter. Vad var det som gjorde att just Öxabäck blev centrum för svensk damfotboll?

    I den här boken följer vi utveckingen från starten 1966, när ett gäng väninnor efter en danskväll i Borås trotsade rådande normer och drog igång vad som skulle bli Sveriges bästa lag. Hör spelare, tränare, styrelsemedlemmar och Öxabäcksbor berätta om lagets uppgång, storhetstid och fall.Detta är historien om Öxabäck, en liten by med ett mycket stort idrottsarv

  • 22.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Oppenheim, Florence
    Göteborgska gjorde första målet för pionjärerna2016In: Idrottsarvet: 2016 / [ed] Cege Berglund, Göteborg: Idrottsmuseet , 2016, p. 88-95Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    21st Century Sports: Movements Without Movements2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    High-altitude training and its relation to mountains and science2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Rationell träning: GCI:s fysiologiska forskning i möte med samhälle och idrott2013In: 200 år av kroppsbildning: Gymnastiska Centralinstitutet/Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan 1813-2013 / [ed] Leif Yttergren och Hans Bolling, Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan , 2013, p. 187-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Science, sport and landscape: The development of high-altitude training methods after 1945.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, most elite endurance athletes use high-altitude training to some extent. For at least the last 40 years, it has been linked to increased performance. But how was high-altitude training established as a means of improving performance? And how did the scientific approach to altitude differ from the traditional, natural valuation of mountains as a site for training? In this essay, these questions are addressed.High-altitude training was introduced in sports in the post-war period. During the 1960s, it became a highly contested method, with controversies between scientists, athletes, doctors, sport organizations and coaches. What ideas about altitude and performance were important in this process? What type of scientific hypotheses led scientists and sport practitioners towards increasing high-altitude training? Interestingly, those within sports who rejected the scientific, ‘machine-like’ training methods also often valued the mountains. Famous Swedish coach Gösta Olander is one example. He was the most influential protagonist of the natural training method in Sweden, and his base was in Vålådalen (in Jämtland, near Östersund and Åre). Both Swedish (e.g. Sixten Jernberg, Gunder Hägg) and international athletes (e.g. Michel Jazy and Michel Bernard) came to Vålådalen. The fresh mountain air and scenic surroundings were important as a place for training camps, but scientists later demystified the mountains via scientific explanations about increased oxygen uptake and increasing hemoglobin levels in the blood. Vålådalen became a center not only for natural training, but also for scientific monitoring, testing and evaluation.And the setting of international standards regarding high-altitude training had a political aspect, as the issue was addressed when white runners from low altitude were threatened by the results of mainly runners from high altitude countries like Kenya and Ethiopia.Focusing on the Swedish case, we will analyze the scientific interest in high-altitude training for sports. Especially, we will study the links between science, military and sports.

  • 27.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Science, sport et environnement: Le développement des techniques d’entraînement en altitude depuis 19452015In: Les liaisons dangereuses de la médecine et du sport / [ed] Grégory Quin, Anaïs Bohuon, Paris: Editions Glyphe, 2015, 1, p. 193-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, most elite endurance athletes use high-altitude training to some extent. For at least the last 40 years, it has been linked to increased performance. But how was high-altitude training established as a means of improving performance? And how did the scientific approach to altitude differ from the traditional, natural valuation of mountains as a site for training?

    High-altitude training was introduced in sports in the post-war period. During the 1960s, it became a highly contested method, with controversies between scientists, athletes, doctors, sport organizations and coaches. What ideas about altitude and performance were important in this process? What type of scientific hypotheses led scientists and sport practitioners towards increasing high-altitude training? Interestingly, those within sports who rejected the scientific, ‘machine-like’ training methods also often valued the mountains. Famous Swedish coach Gösta Olander is one example. He was the most influential protagonist of the natural training method in Sweden, and his base was in Vålådalen (in Jämtland, near Östersund and Åre). Both Swedish (e.g. Sixten Jernberg, Gunder Hägg) and international athletes (e.g. Michel Jazy and Michel Bernard) came to Vålådalen. The fresh mountain air and scenic surroundings were important as a place for training camps, but scientists later demystified the mountains via scientific explanations about increased oxygen uptake and increasing hemoglobin levels in the blood. Vålådalen became a center not only for natural training, but also for scientific monitoring, testing and evaluation.

    And the setting of international standards regarding high-altitude training had a political aspect, as the issue was addressed when white runners from low altitude were threatened by the results of mainly runners from high altitude countries like Kenya and Ethiopia.

    Focusing on the Swedish case, we analyze the scientific interest in high-altitude training for sports. Especially, we study the links between science, military and sports.

  • 28.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Skidåkare med känsla för det rationella2015In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mulk, Inga-Maria
    Slutrapport för "Fjällens rörelsearv: Diskreta monument i hållbar fjällutveckling"2015Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wall-Reinius, Sandra
    ETOUR, Mittuniversitetet.
    Fredman, Peter
    ETOUR, Mittuniversitetet.
    Dahlberg, Annika
    Stockholms universitet.
    Walking on the Shoulders of Giants: Historical Mountain Trails as Management Tools?2017In: The Routledge International Handbook of Walking Studies / [ed] C. M. Hall, Y. Ram, N. Shoval, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 330-339Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Walking in mountains is a way of transport in varied terrain and a means to enhance nature experiences and deepen landscape relations. It is also one of the most popular activities in Swedish outdoor life as well as among international tourists. Mobility has over time and for multiple reasons resulted in a network of trails and pathways – a ‘mobility heritage’. However, this heritage is not static but continuously transformed through new needs and uses, and as such it is a vital component in any reform towards a more sustainable landscape management by and for governing bodies, NGOs, and other interest groups.

     

    Despite multiple users and uses, trails are often discrete, small-scale and with marginal direct effects on local ecology and landscape, although exceptions also exist. However, the long history of multiple actor use of trails and landscapes alongside them, and the reasons and interests behind their location and maintenance, has profoundly affected landscape perceptions over time.

     

    We argue that trails can be used as a tool to engage different interests and to minimize conflicts between different users, while aiming to enhance landscape values for all users. This is highly relevant to various forms of nature conservation, Sami reindeer herding, recreation and tourism. We aim to provide deeper knowledge about trails, conceptually and about their roles, functions, and how this may relate to future management. Against a background of theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to pathways and walking we present our topic through the lens of Swedish mountain trails, with a special focus on Jämtland County. Can the interests of visiting hikers and multiple local and regional interests come to co-exist in a sustainable way by using trails as one main tool? 

  • 31.
    Svensson, Daniel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wormbs, Nina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    The movement heritage: Scale, place, and pathscapes in Anthropocene tourism2015In: Tourism and the Anthropocene / [ed] Martin Gren and Edward Huijbens, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 131-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic change is large-scale. But the Anthropocene is also a result of small-scale, local landscape use and change. These changes and uses are often based in movement. How do movements (sport, outdoor life, tourism etc.) affect landscapes physically and mentally? In the Anthropocene, these questions are increasingly important to answer.

    Mobility in the landscape is under-theorized. The cultural history of walking, with Rousseau, Austen, Thoreau, Muir and others have been discussed (e.g. Solnit 2001). Understandings of landscape monuments are often tied to nationalism (Lowenthal 1998, 2008, Hettne et al 2006) and are generally limited to monuments within traditional areas of cultural and natural heritage (buildings, infrastructure, rare species). But the importance of movement as a practice for understanding landscape and ”life worlds” has also been underlined (Ingold 2000, 2011, Hastrup 2009). The movement heritage, in terms of skiing tracks, hiking trails etc. has to no small degree shaped understanding of the landscape. We investigate how these landscapes of mobility have been and can be articulated, and how they can contribute to a sustainable tourism in the Anthropocene.

    We seek to combine this growing understanding of cultural heritage aspects of landscape with theories from the modern landscapes of bodily movement. These landscapes have been labeled portable (Qviström 2013), but in contrast to this portability, the landscapes of movement we focus on are not portable. Instead, their protection is based on their cultural history and emotional value. Is it possible to combine economic and ecological interests in tourism in the Anthropocene? 

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf