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  • 1. Bergthaller, Hannes
    et al.
    Emmett, Rob
    Johns-Putra, Adeline
    Kneitz, Agnes
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    McCorristine, Shane
    Pérez Ramos, Isabel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Phillips, Dana
    Rigby, Kate
    Robin, Libby
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mapping Common Ground: Ecocriticism, Environmental History, and the Environmental Humanities2014In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 5, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the environmental humanities presents a unique opportunity for scholarship to tackle the human dimensions of the environmental crisis. It might finally allow such work to attain the critical mass it needs to break out of customary disciplinary confines and reach a wider public, at a time when natural scientists have begun to acknowledge that an understanding of the environmental crisis must include insights from the humanities and social sciences. In order to realize this potential, scholars in the environmental humanities need to map the common ground on which close interdisciplinary cooperation will be possible. This essay takes up this task with regard to two fields that have embraced the environmental humanities with particular fervour, namely ecocriticism and environmental history. After outlining an ideal of slow scholarship which cultivates thinking across different spatiotemporal scales and seeks to sustain meaningful public debate, the essay argues that both ecocriticism and environmental history are concerned with practices of environing: each studies the material and symbolic transformations by which “the environment” is configured as a space for human action. Three areas of research are singled out as offering promising models for cooperation between ecocriticism and environmental history: eco-historicism, environmental justice, and new materialism. Bringing the fruits of such efforts to a wider audience will require environmental humanities scholars to experiment with new ways of organizing and disseminating knowledge.

  • 2.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers tekniska universitet.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Environmental Themes in Popular Narratives2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Hamrén, Henrik
    Baltic Eye, Stockholms universitet.
    Berättelsen om Östersjön 2.02016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4. Johnson, A. F.
    et al.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA, United States.
    The balance between concepts and complexity in ecology2018In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 585-587Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Berättelser om havet - och om människor2016In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, no 1, p. 6-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    På bara några årtionden har bilden av havet förändrats. För inte så länge sedan betraktades världshaven som en främmande värld. Nu vet vi att människor interagerar med havet på många olika sätt. Människans påverkan på havet i form av föroreningar, försurning, utfiskning, övergödning samt stigande temperaturer och havsnivåer påverkar i sin tur människors hälsa, säkerhet och tillgång på mat. Men hur hänger våra idéer och föreställningar - våra berättelser - om havet ihop med kunskapsutvecklingen?

  • 6.
    Lidström, Susanna
    King's College, London.
    Different Shades of Green: A Dark Green Counterculture in Ted Hughes's Crow2013In: Ecozona, ISSN 2171-9594, E-ISSN 2171-9594, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 12-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay argues that Crow, a collection of poems by Ted Hughes published in 1970, forms part of a countercultural movement that began to emerge in the 1960s and that continues to find new forms in the current century. In the form it takes in Crow, this movement protests against a relationship between humans and nature based on a primarily Christian world view combined with what it considers an exaggerated belief in science and technology. This combination and its relation to environmental crisis was first addressed by Lynn White in his classical article from 1967, “The Historical Roots of our Ecologic Crisis”. This analysis attempts to demonstrate that the Crow poems, written in the years immediately following the publication of White’s article, express a similar set of ideas in poetic form. Hughes goes a step further than White, and envisions an alternative, spiritual rather than religious, framework for the nature‐human relationship. This alternative is characterised as part of a counterculture described by Bron Taylor in Dark Green Religion. According to Taylor, dark green religion defines a variant of environmentalism based on a spiritual view of nature (similar but not identical to deep ecology). This essay suggests that Hughes’s Crow is a version of this counterculture.

  • 7.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Experiments in ecocriticism: Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney2011Other (Other academic)
  • 8. Lidström, Susanna
    "Jackdawdom": Semiotic Nature in Ted Hughes’s Animal Poems2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Jakt och jägare i främmande länder: Svenska jägare utomlands och utländska jägare i Sverige2014In: Vilt, människa, samhälle - en återblick (forthcoming edited volume), 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Jägare i främmande länder2017In: Jaktens historia i Sverige: vilt, människa, samhälle, kultur / [ed] Kjell Danell, Roger Bergström, Leif Mattsson, Sverker Sörlin, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, p. 133-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Marine environmental change in literary non-fiction: public science writing2015Other (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nature, Environment and Poetry: Ecocriticism and the poetics of Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes2015Book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Ocean Currents and Human Culture: Crossing Disciplinary Borders2015Other (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Position paper: JPI Climate Future Research Leaders Forum2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Science, policy and the role of the IPCC2017Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presentation Abstract: Sea-level rise is potentially one of the most dramatic effects of climate change. In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain and communicate this threat to the public. This paper critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favour of fast-paced but de-contextualised events. The paper argues that both these frames de-politicise sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant political, cultural and ethical considerations, thereby obstructing rather than facilitating appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

  • 17.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain the threat of rising seas to the public. In this talk Susanna Lindstrom critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favor of fast-paced but de-contextualized events. Lindstrom’s presentation argues that both these frames de-politicize sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant social, cultural and ethical considerations. As examples of climate reductionism, these depictions may obstruct rather than facilitate appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

    Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Department of Literature.

  • 18.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: history, science and reductionism2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sea-level rise is a dramatic effect of climate change, with profound implications for societies around the world. In the past few years, a rush of literary non-fiction books have appeared that aim to explain the threat of rising seas to the public. This paper critiques how sea-level rise is framed in many of those books, on two accounts. First, anthropogenic sea-level change is frequently framed by accounts of natural variations of sea level in earth history, focusing on geological rather than societal processes. Second, single and sudden floods are often used to exemplify sea-level rise in ways that draw attention away from incremental environmental change in favour of fast-paced but de-contextualized events. The paper argues that both these frames de-politicize sea-level rise and may steer public understanding and discussion away from relevant social, cultural, and ethical considerations. As examples of climate reductionism, these depictions may obstruct rather than facilitate appropriate negotiations in response to predicted sea-level rise.

  • 19.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Sea-level rise in public science writing: History, science and reductionism2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Stories of the sea: ocean images and environmental crises2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Technology and landscape in Ted Hughes's Elmet poems2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Understanding marine environmental change through literary non-fiction, 1950s-present2015Other (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Garrard, Greg
    “Images adequate to our predicament”: Ecology, Environment and Ecopoetics2014In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 5, p. 35-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the idea of ‘ecopoetry’ by outlining its development from drawing on Romantic and deep ecological traditions in the 1980s to reflecting complex environmental concerns in the 2010s. We identify a distinction between definitions that focus on poetry’s ability to heighten individual readers’ awareness of their physical surroundings on the one hand, and definitions that look for how poems can engage with difficult and complex environmental questions involving scale, justice, and politics on the other. We suggest that the difference between these two kinds of poems might be clarified by differentiating between ecophenomenological and environmental ecopoetry. We argue that recognition of this difference reflects a broader interdisciplinary development in our understanding of the environment as a social category, and that recognising it more readily and clearly could facilitate increased and improved cross-disciplinary discussions between ecocritical studies of poetry specifically, and environmental humanities more broadly. We carry out our analysis through the lens of the work of two influential poets in the Western, Anglophone world, namely Seamus Heaney and Ted Hughes. Heaney and Hughes’s respective poetics exhibit distinctive differences that illustrate our argument. Their poems are frequently taught in university classes on ecopoetry, as well as, especially in their home countries, to younger students, and we argue that the differences we point to in their depictions of human-environment relations are important to recognise in these settings as part of a nuanced and interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between poetry, ecology and environment.

  • 24.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    West, Simon
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Invasive Alien Species2017In: PLoS Ecology BlogArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    West, Simon
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Changing Our Attitudes Towards Invasive “Alien” Species2017In: PLoS Ecology BlogArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    West, Simon
    Katzschner, Tania
    Pérez - Ramos, M. Isabel
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Twidle, Hedley
    Invasive Narratives and the Inverse of Slow Violence: Alien Species in Science and Society2015In: Environmental humanities, ISSN 2201-1919, E-ISSN 2201-1919, Vol. 7, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental narratives have become an increasingly important area of study in the environmental humanities. Rob Nixon has drawn attention to the difficulties of representing the complex processes of environmental change that inflict ‘slow violence’ on vulnerable human (and non-human) populations. Nixon argues that a lack of “arresting stories, images and symbols” reduces the visibility of gradual problems such as biodiversity loss, climate change and chemical pollution in cultural imaginations and on political agendas. We agree with Nixon that addressing this representational imbalance is an important mission for the environmental humanities. However, we argue that another aspect of the same imbalance, or representational bias, suggests the inverse of this is also needed—to unpack the ways that complicated and multifaceted environmental phenomena can be reduced to fast, simple, evocative, invasive narratives that percolate through science, legislation, policy and civic action, and to examine how these narratives can drown out rather than open up possibilities for novel social-ecological engagements. In this article we demonstrate the idea of invasive narratives through a case study of the ‘invasive alien species’ (IAS) narrative in South Africa. We suggest that IAS reduces complex webs of ecological, biological, economic, and cultural relations to a simple ‘good’ versus ‘bad’ battle between easily discernible ‘natural’ and ‘non-natural’ identities. We argue that this narrative obstructs the options available to citizens, land managers and policy-makers and prevents a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics and implications of biodiversity change, in South Africa and beyond.

  • 27.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers universitet.
    Havet stiger!: Fakta och fiktion om stigande havsnivåer2016Other (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lidström, Susanna
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Rising seas: facts, fictions and aquaria2016In: Curating the future: museums, communities and climate change / [ed] Jennifer Newell, Libby Robin, Kirsten Wehner, Routledge, 2016, 1, p. 230-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Pérez-Ramos, M. Isabel
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
    “Dam a River, Damn a People?”: Subverting dams in/through subaltern narrativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes how the symbolism of dams as material representations of Nation and Progress can be subverted through literary tropes. We show how, in a set of subaltern narratives, dams instead come to represent environmental degradation and cultural disintegration resulting from the slow violence brought about by the imposition of these infrastructures. The narratives, all examples of writer activism, portray “invisibilized” ethnic minorities―or “unimagined communities”―resisting real and fictional dam projects in several different locations around the world: the U.S. Southwest, the U.S. Northeast/Canada’s Southeast, northern Sweden, and western India.

  • 30. Åberg, A.
    et al.
    Höffken, J.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Looking for perspectives! EU energy policy in context2018In: Advancing Energy Policy: Lessons on the Integration of Social Sciences and Humanities, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitioning to less carbon-intensive energy systems involves making difficult choices and priorities. This chapter imagines three individuals who are affected in different ways by EU energy policy. Their fictional stories illustrate that energy policies are embedded in social, historical and cultural practices and need to take a broader perspective than either technological fixes or a narrowly defined goal of low or zero carbon emissions to be fair and effective. We argue that this is often not reflected in the EU's energy policy frameworks, and use the Energy Roadmap 2050 to demonstrate our point. Contrary to the impression given by the roadmap, a narrow technocratic empirical basis for a policy is not enough to define and solve an energy problem. Energy issues are societal problems and need to be addressed as such.

  • 31.
    Åberg, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Höffken, Johanna
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Looking for Perspectives!: EU Energy Policy in Context2018In: Advancing Energy Policy: Lessons on the Integration of Social Sciences and Humanities / [ed] Chris Foulds and Rosie Robison, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitioning to less carbon-intensive energy systems involves making difficult choices and priorities. This chapter imagines three individuals who are affected in different ways by EU energy policy. Their fictional stories illustrate that energy policies are embedded in social, historical and cultural practices and need to take a broader perspective than either technological fixes or a narrowly defined goal of low or zero carbon emissions to be fair and effective. We argue that this is often not reflected in the EU's energy policy frameworks, and use the Energy Roadmap 2050 to demonstrate our point. Contrary to the impression given by the roadmap, a narrow technocratic empirical basis for a policy isnot enough to define and solve an energy problem. Energy issues are soci-etal problems and need to be addressed as such.

  • 32.
    Åberg, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lidström, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Rising Seas: Facts, Fictions and Aquaria2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rising Seas: Facts, fictions and aquaria While exhibiting ocean environments presents particular practical difficulties to most museums, rising sea levels and other drastic changes in the sea make the ocean an essential part of any exhibit on climate change. This paper will examine how aquaria and other museums interpret and showcase ocean science in their attempts to imagine a warmer future world.To do this, we will look at a few specific cases of representations of the ocean in climate change exhibits. How is the sea represented or showcased? What kinds of artefacts are used? What narratives accompany the representation? Is the ocean presented as an alien environment, or is it shown to be permeated by pollution and other signs of human presence? Is it meaningful to talk about 'the ocean' as one place, or do we need to refer to specific places or habitats, differentiating between shallow seas with coral reefs and familiar species and the less well-known deep oceans, for instance? Based on these case studies, we will attempt a more general discussion and analysis of the role of future visions for imagining what a marine Anthropocene might look like and how they can be exhibited in the context of local and global climate change.

1 - 32 of 32
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