Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nyorientering av svensk sjukvård: Verksamhetstjänande implementeringslogiker bygger mer hållbart engagemang och utveckling - i praktiken2016Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Holden, Richard
    Lean implementation approaches at different levels in Swedish hospitals: the importance for working conditions, worker engagement, health and performance2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Swedish healthcare organizations are investing heavily in internal reforms. Lean has been frequently used as an overall concept to improve care processes and decrease costs. Some evidence shows positive results, especially if work environment issues are considered in parallel with other desired outcomes. However, there are considerable difficulties in evaluating lean as a concept since its application and interpretation seem to vary widely. Further, like for other management concepts, lean outcomes crucially depend on the implementation process.

    Aim

    This program investigates implementations of lean and lean-like developments of processes of care, and how these affect the working conditions, health, and performance of healthcare employees. We also investigated organizational factors and conditions that mediated specific outcomes.

    Method

    Mixed method design: questionnaire to employees (n=880) and managers (n=320), qualitative interviews (n=55) and observations with follow up during three years. Five hospitals were selected, and within them five units that were connected by their flow of acute care patients, i.e. the emergency unit, the medical and surgical emergency ward (or ICU at small hospital) as well as one medical and one surgical ward. Initially we used qualitative-driven analyses and thereafter quantitative-driven mixed method analysis.

    Results

    The implementation strategies varied between the hospitals and between the strategic and operative levels. Strategic managers also used different approaches to overcome the gap between strategic and operative levels. Operative managers shared similarities in their stepwise and coaching approaches encouraging participation among employees, but differences regarding how assignments were delegated. Social capital and attitudes among health care profession were of importance for employees’ work engagement and active engagement in development work.

  • 3.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard J.
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, US.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care clinicians' engagement in organizational redesign of care processes: Health care clinicians' engagement in organizational redesign of care processes2018In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 68, p. 249-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish health care system is reorienting towards horizontal organization for care processes. A main challenge is to engage health care clinicians in the process. The aim of this study was to assess engagement (i.e. attitudes and beliefs, the cognitive state and clinical engagement behaviour) among health care clinicians, and to investigate how engagement was related to work resources and demands during organizational redesign. A cohort study was conducted, using a questionnaire distributed to clinicians at five hospitals working with care process improvement approaches, two of them having implemented Lean production. The results show that kinds of engagement are interlinked and contribute to clinical engagement behaviour in quality of care and patient safety. Increased work resources have importance for engagements in organizational improvements, especially in top-down implementations. An extended work engagement model during organizational improvements in health care was supported. The model contributes to knowledge about how and when clinicians are mobilized to engage in organizational changes.

  • 4.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care professionals’ motivation, engagement and collaboration in organizational developments of processes of care2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean implementation at different levels in Swedish hospitals: the importance for working conditions and stress2015In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 235-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare organisations in Sweden are reorienting toward horizontal organisation around care processes. This paper's aim was to investigate how implementation approaches for improvements of care processes in line with lean production (LP), at hospital strategic and operative levels, are associated with working conditions and stress-related health among the employees. Five hospitals working with improvements to care processes were studied using questionnaires to employees (n = 1,303) and interviews at strategic and operative levels at baseline and follow-up. The process redesign implementation strategies varied between the strategic and operative levels. There were associations between a higher degree of LP at operative level and increased work resources and decreased work demands. Physical, cognitive and mental stress-related symptoms were only weakly associated with strategic or operative LP initiatives. There was evidence of more beneficial or improved working conditions in relation to higher degree of LP at operative levels.

  • 6.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Elg, M
    Eriksson, A
    Halling, Bengt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, H
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andersson, K
    Håkansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Langstrand, J
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Renström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, L
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean and working conditions: a current position2013In: HELIX Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard J.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    A Case Study of Three Swedish Hospitals' Strategies for Implementing Lean Production2016In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 105-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many hospitals have recently implemented the management concept lean production. The aim of this study was to learn how and why three Swedish hospitals selected and developed their hospital-wide lean production strategies. Although previous research shows that the concept is implemented in various ways, there is limited research on how and why different hospitals choose different implementation strategies and if the chosen strategies contribute to sustainable participation in organizational development. A case study of three different Swedish hospitals implementing lean production was thus performed. We studied the content of the hospitals' selected implementation strategies, conditions and rationales behind their strategy selection, and how different organizational actors participated in the implementation. Qualitative interviews with 54 key actors at the studied hospitals were performed. In addition, a self-administered survey questionnaire to employees was answered at T1 (2012, n = 557), T2 (2013, n = 554), and T3 (2014, n = 366). The three studied hospitals chose different strategies for implementing lean production due to different contextual conditions and for different reasons. The hospital-wide implementation strategies were related to employees' interest and participation in lean production. The results show that many different actors at different organizational levels need to participate in lean production in order to sustain and diffuse change processes. Furthermore, broad motives including quality of care seem to be needed for engaging different professional groups.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Implementation of the organizational concept lean production: Case studies of two Swedish hospitals2012In: NOVO Symposium: Hållbar hälso- och sjukvård, 2012, p. 25-25Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).
    Motivations and strategies for why and how to implement the organizational concept lean – a case study of a Swedish hospital2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyze motivations and strategies of a Swedish hospital for why and how to implement lean. A case study, including interviews with key actors, observations and document analysis, was performed. Lean was in the studied hospital viewed as tools to deal with suggestions from employees on how to improve the delivery of care. Process leaders employed for a limited time were responsible for implementing lean in the different units. The hospitals future choices of implementation strategies, including training of managers, can be seen ascritical for motivating unit-level managers to sustain lean over time.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Three Swedish hospitals’ lean strategies and their contribution to organizational development2014In: ODAM/NES, 2014, p. 657-658Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Holden, Richard J
    et al.
    Department of BioHealth Informatics, Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Healthcare workers' perceptions of lean: A context-sensitive, mixed methods study in three Swedish hospitals2015In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 46, p. 181-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the application of lean in healthcare expands, further research is needed in at least two areas: first, on the role of context in shaping lean and its consequences and second, on how healthcare workers perceive lean. Accordingly, this context-sensitive, mixed methods study addressed how hospital workers' perceptions of lean varied across contexts in three Swedish hospitals. Registered nurses and physicians at the hospitals and across units differing in acuity completed standardized surveys (N = 236, 57% response rate) about their perceptions of hospital-wide lean implementation. Perceptions varied by: hospital context, with one hospital's employees reporting the least favorable perceptions; unit acuity, with higher-acuity units reporting more favorable perceptions; and professional role, with nurses reporting more favorable perceptions than physicians. Individual interviews, group interviews, and observations provided insight about these dissimilar contexts and possible explanations for context-specific variability. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies for implementing lean in healthcare; the importance of attending to levels, context, and worker consequences of lean; and directions for future research.

  • 12. Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Interprofessional Learning for Enhanced Patient Safety: Biomedical Engineering Students and Nursing Students in Joint Learning Activities.2019In: Journal of Research in Interprofessional Practice and Education, ISSN 1916-7342, E-ISSN 1916-7342, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the last decade, research has highlighted the importance of interprofessional approaches to education and practice. Collaboration between medical practice and engineering has been identified as particularly relevant to developing accountable models for sustainable healthcare and overcoming increased specialization leading to professional barriers. This study aims to analyze insights and understanding expressed by nursing students and biomedical engineering students following a joint learning activity regarding a medical device used in the hospital setting.

    Method: A qualitative approach deriving from a phenomenological view examined an interprofessional learning activity where the focus was on active integration and knowledge exchange.

    Conclusion: The activity was expressed as a positive opportunity for getting insights into perspectives from other professional groups as well as insights into the importance of a system perspective in patient safety. The learning and insights listed in the evaluations included ideas about how the two professional groups could collaborate in the future.

  • 13.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Change agents and use of visual management tools in care process redesign: Implications on working conditions for operative managers and healthcare professionals2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish healthcare has been subject to change efforts to increase efficiency in care processes. In the 2000-2010’s lean production has influenced healthcare with change approaches such as visual management tools to increase patient flows and efficiency. Most previous research on lean healthcare has focused single hospitals or departments as case studies focusing lean production as successful for efficiency, or “mean” production affecting the work environment. Focus in this thesis though is instead on what strategies and approaches hospitals use in their care process redesign and their associations with working conditions and systems performance. This thesis’ overall aim was to assess change strategies and change approaches at strategic and operative levels during care process redesign at hospitals, focusing organization of change agents and use of visual management tools, and its implica-tions for alignment, working conditions and systems performance. Four studies were conducted at five Swedish hospitals, whereof three had lean-inspired change strategies. One qualitative cross-sectional study, one quantitative longitudinal study and two mixed method longitudinal studies are included in the thesis. Data was collected over three years with semi-structured interviews, structured interviews, staff questionnaires, manager questionnaires and photo document-ation. Qualitative data were analyzed by content analysis. Quantitative data were analyzed with Wilcoxon tests, mixed models of repeated measurements, ANOVA, and linear regression models. Results showed strategies involve operative manag-ers as change drivers, supported by change agent functions. Change agents’ contribution to change depends on e.g. closeness to operative managers due to the change agents place in the healthcare hierarchy, and also clarity regarding roles and responsibilities in change. Change agents with a close collaboration with operative managers, have better preconditions to contribute to alignment between change strategies and change approaches. Hospital care units in the 2010’s tend to use lean-inspired operative change approaches also without working with change strategies based on lean. Operative lean approaches show associations with positive working conditions for healthcare professionals. Visual management tools as change strategy has potential to support collaboration and communication within and between organizational levels and is considered to contribute to systems performance and alignment. Visual management tools as a cognitive job resource for operative managers show associations with e.g. lower burnout and more functioning collaboration as well as daily use among nurses show associations with cognitive, social and emotional benefits, perceived systems performance and buffering mental stress. Change agents and use of visual management tools are considered as contributors for operative managers’ and healthcare professionals’ sustainable work during care process redesign.

  • 14.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Operative managers' job-demands-resources when redesigning care processesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim was to describe hospitals’ approaches to use change agents and visualmanagement tools, and examine change agents and visual management tools as job resourcesfor operative managers, during care process redesign.

    Design

    A longitudinal three year (T0, T1, T2) mixed method design was used. Qualitativedata from semi-structured interviews was collected at five hospitals (T0, T2). Quantitativedata from questionnaires (T1, T2) was collected to examine the use and support from changeagents and visual management tools among operative managers at the hospitals. Operativemanagers’ support and associations with their working conditions were further examined inrelation to the Job Demands and Resources model. Analyses of differences between groups ofoperative managers were performed with Wilcoxon tests.

    Findings

    Change agents as emotional job resources supported operative managers whenintroducing care process redesign. Higher change agent support was associated to positiveresults regarding burnout and organizational outcomes. Visual management tools as cognitivejob resources supported operative managers when used daily, and were associated to positiveresults regarding burnout, and organizational outcomes. Combined support from both changeagents and visual management tools was associated to beneficial organizational outcomes(collaboration between operative managers as well as between operative managers andhealthcare professionals during care process redesign, and possibilities to fulfill managerialduties) and thus were considered as important job resources for operative managers to drivechange.

  • 15.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Karltun, Anette
    Nurses’ use of visual management in hospitals - a longitudinal, quantitative study on its implications on systems performance and working conditions2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 760-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine potential benefits provided by dailyvisual management tool use and explore its association with systems performanceand working conditions among hospital nurses.Background: Visual management tools used in everyday work and improvementwork in health care theoretically contribute to shared understanding of complexwork systems and provide certain user benefits. Cognitive load, miscommunicationwithin and between professional groups, and pressure to engage in care processredesign add to nurses’ strained working conditions.Design: Quantitative longitudinal.Methods: Questionnaires were distributed at T0, (N = 948, 66% response rate), T1(N = 900, 70% response rate), and T2 (N = 621, 72% response rate) to nurses atfive hospitals. Three groups of users (daily users, start users, and non‐daily users)were compared by means T1–T2 (significance tested with Wilcoxon signed ranktest) and by mixed model repeated measures T0, T1, T2.Results: Daily use associated to better overview of work, collaboration, social capital,and clinical engagement. Job resources were rated higher by daily users. Mentalstress increased and development opportunities decreased over time among nondailyusers. There were associations between use and perceptions of systems performance,though the differences between groups were small.Conclusion: This study specifically explores visual management tool use in the hospitalsetting, which contributes to research by broadening the understanding of cognitive,social, and emotional benefits provided by visual management tool use. Dailyuse was associated to positive working conditions, small but positive differences insystems performance, and indicated a buffering effect on nurses’ mental stress.

  • 16.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Karltun, Anette
    Visual management in hospitals during organizational developments: Benefits and contributions for working conditions and efficacy.2015In: Proceedings from 9th NOVO Symposium, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many hospitals choose to use certain tools related to lean, such as visual management (VM) during organizational development (OD) and daily processes. By using VM in the strategic planning process and depending on what is visualized in what stage of the planning process, different cognitive, social and emotional benefi ts may be gained. Research on VM in healthcare has so far concerned case studies of VM in surgical departments or during OD, and there is a lack of studies with rich empirical data. The aim of this paper was to explore VM use at hospital units undergoing OD; the main VM focus, and the benefi ts and perceived VM contributions concerning working conditions and efficacy.

  • 17.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Karltun, Anette
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Visualizing improvements of care processes- supporting engagement and perceived systems performance in improvement work2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Organization of change agents during care process redesign in Swedish health care2016In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Swedish health care organizations (HCOs) are changing using management concepts such as Lean, in attempts of improving efficiency, quality of care and work environment. Since there are pre-conditional challenges for operative managers to engage in change, HCOs tend to assign supportive functions such as change agents (CAs) to facilitate change. Research on the use of CAs in HCOs is sparse, thus the aim of this study explores role assignments and conditions of formally appointed CAs contributing to care process redesign.

    Methods: A purposive sample of three Swedish hospitals initiating Lean-inspired care process redesign during 2010–2011 was done. In-depth interviews were held with fifty-one key functions during change. Focus group interviews were conducted with thirty-eight health care professionals. Data were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: Top managers’ goal was to have operative management responsible for change during care process redesign, with support from assigned CAs. Organizing of CAs varied concerning, e.g. their hierarchical positions, job descriptions and practices, and conditions to act as driving forces towards change. Being granted formal power, having earned legitimacy and credibility, clarity regarding roles and responsibilities in change; a good sense of timing and ability to build relationships and trust, were identified as beneficial for CAs to support change.

    Conclusions: Role assignment and organizing of CAs varies. A position closer to the operative levels, formalized and clarified responsibilities, earned legitimacy and timing support adaptation and alignment of planned change, such as Lean-inspired care process redesign.

  • 19.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    The organization and work practice of change agents in health care organizations; effects on health care professionals’ engagement and participation in improvement work2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Who are the change agents when hospitals are implementing Lean?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Williamsson, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Anette
    Jönköping University.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Gothenburg.
    Visual management; condition or consequence to social capital and clinical engagement among nurses?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf