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  • 1.
    Darmani, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Dwaikat, Nidal
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Technical University of Madrid, UPM.
    Ramirez Portilla, Andres
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Twelve Years of Scholary Research: Content and Trend Analysis of the Journal Creativity and Innovation Management2013In: IAMOT 2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the internationally recognized journals that publishes and spreads literature concerning the relation between organizations and innovation and how creativity and imagination is organized is ‘Creativity and Innovation Management’ (CAIM). To date there has been only one attempt to analyze the corpus of publications in this journal from 1992-2000. As no further historical analysis of CAIM has been done after it, the purpose of this paper is to present a content analysis and verify some of the trends within published articles for the last 12 years. This study is conducted by analyzing the content of latest 360 CAIM articles (published from 2000 to 2012). Data collection and analysis are performed by utilizing Publish-or-Perish software and also, Excel statistical analysis tools. This methodology uses a multi-approach to content analysis by interpreting the text in titles and abstracts to evaluate several elements, for instance the authorship characteristics, geographical contributions or the nine themes previously proposed and visible in the CAIM journal. The study outcomes in addition to the descriptive statistics that provide an overview of the research contributions, intend to gain insights in two important aspects. First, this study confirms how the articles categorized in the nine themes have behaved in the last 12 years. Second, the study reveals that some trends in the literature came from emerging markets economies (EME), which has not been raised so far, as the relation of author’s countries and the themes of their publications in the EME context.

  • 2.
    Dwaikat, Nidal
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Flexibility through Information Sharing: Evidences from the Automotive Industry in Sweden2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has validated the contribution of information sharing to performance improvement. It has also suggested that flexibility is a highly important competitive priority for those companies where demand is volatile. Several studies argue that flexibility has been recognized as a key enabler for supply chain responsiveness. However, the impact of information sharing on supplier flexibility is still unexplored, especially for the companies that operate in agile business environments such as in the automotive industry where flexibility is a strategic requirement to manage demand uncertainty. In agile supply chains, such as in the automotive industry, information sharing can play an important role in responding to demand variability. In such settings, the demand volumes generally fluctuate, and hence create production-scheduling problems for the upstream suppliers such as first-tier suppliers. Interestingly, the impact of demand fluctuations on suppliers is higher than that of Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs).

    The aim of this doctoral thesis is to investigate the role of information sharing between OEMs and first-tier suppliers, in enhancing supplier flexibility. Particularly, the research focuses on exploring the relationship between sharing demand schedules and inventory data, and volume and delivery flexibility. The questions on whether information sharing between OEMs and first-tier suppliers affect supplier flexibility remain unanswered. The following research questions have emerged: 

    • RQ1: How does information sharing between OEMs and first-tier suppliers affect the latter's responsiveness to fluctuating demand?
    • RQ2: What is the relationship between information sharing of OEMsʼ demand forecasts and inventory data, and suppliers’ volume and delivery flexibility?
    • RQ3: What factors should OEMs consider to improve the sharing of demand forecasts with suppliers?

    The empirical part of this thesis comprises three individual studies that constitute the empirical foundations of the research problem. Each study analyzes one research question using its own methodological approach. Hence, different research methods for collecting and analyzing data were used to address the research questions. Applying different research methods is deemed advantageous because it allows for methodological rigorousness in this doctoral thesis.

    This thesis contributes to the body of knowledge in three dimensions—theory, method, and context. First, it contributes to the academic field of operations and supply chain management by developing a model to explain how information sharing could affect suppliers’ delivery performance. The model provides a measurement scale to measure the level of information sharing between OEMs and suppliers, and its impact on suppliers’ delivery flexibility. Second, this thesis contributes to the methods by using state-of-the-art techniques, which is partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) including consistent PLS, and applying advanced concepts to empirically test the proposed model. Third, this thesis has a managerial contribution to examine the concept of information sharing and flexibility at the supplier level. Investigating the problem at the supplier level may enable managers to improve short-term decisions, such as production scheduling decisions, internal production, and inventory processes, and evaluate collaboration practices with OEMs.

    This doctoral thesis is organized in a monograph format comprising five chapters: Introduction, Literature review, Methodology, Empirics, and Conclusion. As an outcome, several scientific articles have emerged from this thesis and have been submitted for consideration for publication in peer-reviewed journals and international conferences in the field of operations and supply chain management. These articles are listed and appended at the end of this dissertation.

  • 3.
    Dwaikat, Nidal
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Technical University of Madrid UPM.
    Why Firms should not pursue the same purchasing competitive priorities2012In: / [ed] Martin Christopher, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies, when buying, use the same competitive priorities regardless of the category of the product being purchased. This purchasing practice creates misalignment between the purchasing and business strategies of a firm. The main aim of this paper is to theoretically explain why firms should not pursue the same competitive priorities for all purchased product categories. By analyzing most relevant literature and research findings published in peer-reviewed journals, this paper argues that strategic alignment between the purchasing competitive priorities and overall business strategy is of higher priority when buying strategic items than other categories. This research contributes to the field by introducing a conceptual framework that provides a further dimension to the strategic alignment concept. The framework aims to introduce the concept ‘strategic supply relatedness’.

  • 4.
    Dwaikat, Nidal Y.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Flexibilityand responsiveness through information sharing: Evidence from automotive suppliers in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dwaikat, Nidal Y.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Information sharing with first-tier suppliers: A volume-flexibility perspective2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has empirically validated the contribution of information sharing to supply chain performance. However, the question of how information sharing affects first-tier supplier’s ability to respond to fluctuating volumes remains unexplored. This paper explores how information sharing between Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) and first-tier supplier in automotive industry affects the supplier's volume flexibility. Anchored in 16 semi-structured interviews with executives of eight automotive supplier firms in Sweden, the study proposes a conceptual framework to understand how information sharing affects the suppliers' delivery performance.

  • 6.
    Dwaikat, Nidal Y.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Money, Arthur H.
    Beheshti, Hooshang M.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    How does information sharing affect first-tier suppliers’ flexibility?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 6 of 6
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