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  • 1. Burkle, M.
    et al.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Defining the role adjustment profile of learners and instructors online2013In: Journal of asynchronous learning networks, ISSN 1939-5256, E-ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the experience of post-secondary first time online students combining time spent in the classroom-workshop with online course access, and their interactions with instructors. In the following discussion, and following the Cleveland et al. [1] model, a comparison between the categories 'student's role adjustment' and 'instructors' role' is presented.

  • 2.
    Bälter, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Pettersson, Kerstin
    Stockholm University.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University.
    Svedin, Maria
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Student Approaches to Learning in Relation to Online Course Completion2013In: Canadian Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 0316-1218, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between approaches to studying and course completion in two online preparatory university courses in math- ematics and computer programming. The students participating in the two courses are alike in age, gender, and approaches to learning. Four hundred and ninety-three students participating in these courses answered the short version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). Results show that students demonstrating a deep approach to learning in ei- ther course are more likely to complete. In the mathematics course, a com- bination of deep and strategic approaches correlates positively with course completion. In the programming course, students who demonstrate a surface approach are less likely to complete. These results are in line with the inten- tions of the course designers, but they also suggest ways to improve these courses. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that ASSIST can be used to evaluate course design. 

  • 3.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Faculty development for online and blended learning: Communities of inquiry in higher education reform2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Learning to Learn Online: A MOOC with a difference for novice online learners2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Research in online and blended learning: Communities of inquiry in higher education reform2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teaching in blended communities of inquiry2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology-enabled learning MOOC for teachers in the developing world.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Ally, Mohamed
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Wark, Norine
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Fung, Tak
    University of Calgary, Canada.
    Emotional Presence and Mobile Learning: Learner-driven Responses in a Wireless World2013In: European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning, p. 106-117Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the use of mobile devices among online graduate students, and what effect, if any, this use has on emotional presence. We suggest that emotion exists as part of the online experience, just as it does in all human experience. The intensity of graduate study and the benefit of increased interaction through online communities may be a catalyst for both increased use of mobile communication devices to support learning and a stimulus for emotion. Results demonstrate that half the online graduate students in this study use mobile devices in support of their learning. Emotional presence does exist for online graduate students but it is not influenced by mobile device use. There is a significant gender difference in the measurement of emotional presence.

  • 9.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Briton, M.
    Gismondi, M.
    Ives, C.
    MOOC instructional design principles: Ensuring quality across scale an d diversity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Campbell, P.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Emotional presence, learning, and the online learning environment2012In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 269-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of evidence that more and more students are engaging in online learning experiences, details about the transition for teachers and students to a new learning environment are still unconfirmed. While new technologies are often expected to make work easier, they also involve the development of new competencies. This change may, in itself, elicit an emotional response, and, more importantly, emotion may impact the experience of online learning. Knowledge about the impact of emotion on learning broadly is available, but not about emotion and online learning. This study presents evidence of emotions present in online environments, and empirical data which suggests emotional presence may exist as a fundamental element in an online community of inquiry.

  • 11.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Garrison, D. R.
    Higher education and post-industrial society: New ideas about teaching, learning, and technology2012In: The Next Generation of Distance Education: Unconstrained Learning / [ed] Moller, L.; Huett, J. B., New York, USA: Springer, 2012, 1, p. 221-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gauvreau, Sarah
    Faculty role change: Adjustment to the influence of online teaching and learning2015In: European Journal of Open, Distance and eLearning, EDEN Special Issue, p. 134-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gauvreau, Sarah
    Online support for online graduate students: Fostering Student Development through Web-based Discussion and Support2011In: European Journal of Open, Distance and e-Learning, ISSN 1027-5207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leadership and Pedagogical Change: Accidental, Ad‐Hoc, or Arranged?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leading for pedagogical change2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16. Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    Seery, Niall
    OConnor, Adrian
    Identifying, Developing and Grading Soft Skills in Higher Education2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Influence of Emotion on Cognitive Presence in a Case of Online Math Coaching2014In: Challenges for Research into Open & Distance Learning: Doing Things Better – Doing Better Things. Proceedings of the European Distance and E-Learning Network 2014 Research Workshop , Oxford, 2014, p. 87-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics instruction using online coaching. Instructive communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Coachees range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom, Cleveland-Innes, & Hrastinski (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching called the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer ( 2000, 2001). Transcript analysis of Math Coach conversations indicates that emotional expression is a natural part of the practical inquiry process that constitutes cognitive presence.

  • 18. Gauvreau, S.
    et al.
    Hurst, D.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Hawranik, P.
    Online professional skills workshops: Perspectives from distance education graduate students2016In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 106-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While many online graduate students are gaining academic and scholarly knowledge, the opportunities for students to develop and hone professional skills essential for the workplace are lacking. Given the virtual environment of distance learning, graduate students are often expected to glean professional skills such as analytical thinking, self-awareness, flexibility, team-building, and problem-solving inherently through informal means (Cleveland-Innes & Ally, 2012). The goal of this study was to evaluate the experiences of online graduate students participating in synchronous online professional skills workshops. Students attended the sessions from the various graduate programs at an online Canadian university. The discussions from the focus group held at the end of the project were used to achieve the research goals. This paper used a phenomenological lens to accomplish its research goals. The participants reported that they experienced a "sense of community" and learned skills that were not included in their academic programs.

  • 19.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Tutoring online tutors: Using digital badges to encourage the development of online tutoring skills2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online tutors play a critical role in e-learning and need to have an appropriate set of skills in addition to subject matter expertise. This paper explores how digital badges can be used to encourage the development of online tutoring skills. Based on previous research, we defined three digital badges, which are examples of essential tutoring skills.These skills were self-assessed during two weeks by online tutors in K-12 mathematics, who also wrote a self-reflection based on their experience. The digital badges motivated tutors to reflect on online tutoring practices. The tutors described that they gained a more detailed understanding of the tutoring process when continuously analyzing ongoing conversations. However, it was a challenge for the tutors to balance the private activity, reflection on tutoring skills, and the social activity, communication with the K-12 students. It is essential to take into account when tutors will have time to reflect, for example, by scheduling time for reflection or enabling opportunities for reflection that is flexible in time. A challenge for further research is to better understand the potential benefits of different types of badges

  • 20.
    Hurst, Deborah
    et al.
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Hawranik, Pamela
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gauvreau, Sarah
    Contact North.
    Online graduate student identity and professional skills development2013In: Canadian Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 0316-1218, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 36-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graduate students are assumed to develop skills in oral and written communication and collegial relationships that are complementary to formal graduate programs. However, it appears only a small number of universities provide such professional development opportunities alongside academic programs, and even fewer do so online. There appears to be an assumption in higher education that students develop professional skills by virtue of learning through required academic tasks and having proximity to other students and faculty. Skeptics of online study raise questions about whether graduate students studying online can participate fully in such graduate communities and access these informal professional skill-building opportunities. It is possible that such activities may have to be designed and delivered for online graduate students. This paper presents preliminary qualitative findings from a project that developed, offered, and evaluated such online opportunities. Findings suggest that while online graduate students can and do develop professional skills while navigating their studies, building relationships, and participating in online learning communities, they are keen to develop such professional skills in a more deliberate way.

  • 21. Ostashewski, N.
    et al.
    Howell, J.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Optimizing K-12 education through online and blended learning2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of information and communication technologies in education is unavoidable, as an increasing percentage of educators embrace modern technology, others are faced with the decision to reevaluate their own pedagogical practices or become obsolete. To meet the needs of students, one must first define what stipulates a successful K-12 student, the best practices of online classrooms, the warning signs for low-performing students, and how to engage web-based students. Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning addresses the models, support, cases, and delivery of K-12 online education. Seeking to further the conversation about the most effective ways to integrate ICT into the classroom, this publication presents theoretical frameworks to support educators and administrators. This book is an essential collection of research for teachers, administrators, students of education, IT professionals, developers, and policy makers.

  • 22. Richardson, J. C.
    et al.
    Arbaugh, J. B.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    Athabasca University, Canada.
    Ice, P.
    Swan, K. P.
    Garrison, D. R.
    Using the community of inquiry framework to inform effective instructional design2012In: The Next Generation of Distance Education: Unconstrained Learning, Springer US , 2012, Vol. 9781461417859, p. 97-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Community of Inquiry (CoI) model views the online learning experience as a function of the relationship between three elements: social presence, teaching presence, and cognitive presence. The proposed panel and chapter will focus on how the CoI framework can be used to guide the design and implementation of online courses through the explication of measures verifying the CoI. In addition, factors external but influential to the model-technology, disciplinary differences, and the role of the online instructor-are reviewed.

  • 23.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Online Coaching as Teacher Training: Using a Relationship of Inquiry Framework2016In: Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning / [ed] Ostashewski, N.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Howell, J., Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Internet for educational purposes is now commonly accepted. More challenging is the realizationof this potential, particularly in the K-12 education environment. According to the growing literatureon this topic, using Internet technology during K-12 teacher training will provide more knowledge andskills for teachers wishing to use Internet technology in their own classrooms. In an adaption of theonline Community of Inquiry, a revised framework for one-to-one online teaching was developed. In theRelationship of Inquiry framework, the elements of cognitive, teaching, social, and emotional presenceoutline the educational experience of one student receiving learning support from one teacher. Theframework was tested with pre-service teachers using the Math Coach program which offers help withmathematics just-in-time via instant messaging.

  • 24.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Benjaminsson, Simon
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Digital badges for in-service training of online tutors2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation, an application where digital badges are used for continuing training of online tutors is reviewed. First, we present how digital badges are used in a math tutoring service for K–12 students. Then, we discuss benefits and challenges of digital badges for development of in-service online tutors.

  • 25.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Emotional presence in a relationship of inquiry: The case of one-to-one online math coaching2016In: Online Learning, ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions have been confirmed to be a critical component of the process of learning. In the online Community of Inquiry theoretical framework, and the recently suggested online Relationship of Inquiry framework, emotions are considered a subsection of social presence. In this study, the concept of emotional presence is examined. This examination occurs within the Relationship of Inquiry framework, developed to analyze one-to-one online coaching. A survey of online coaches and a transcript coding procedure from the online coaching service Math Coach provide the data for the study. The results indicate that a Relationship of Inquiry framework consisting of cognitive, social, teaching, and emotional presence enhances the exploration of one-to-one online coaching settings. The interpretation of these results identifies emotional presence as an essential and distinct part of one-to-one online math coaching.

  • 26.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. Athabasca University.
    The relationship of Inquiry – a framework for design and analysis of online coaching2014In: NGL 2014: Next Generation Learning Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation introduces the Relationship of Inquiry framework. It is a theoretical framework for design and analysis of online coaching, a one-to-one inquiry-based online learning activity. The video introduces the framework. During the seminar we will discuss this framework with data from an online coaching program called Math Coach.

  • 27. Vaughan, Norman D.
    et al.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Garrison, Randy
    Teaching in Blended Learning Environments: Creating and Sustaining Communities of Inquiry2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching in Blended Learning Environments provides a coherent framework in which to explore the transformative concept of blended learning. Blended learning can be defined as the organic integration of thoughtfully selected and complementary face-to-face and online approaches and technologies. A direct result of the transformative innovation of virtual communication and online learning communities, blended learning environments have created new ways for teachers and students to engage, interact, and collaborate. The authors argue that this new learning environment necessitates significant role adjustments for instructors and generates a need to understand the aspects of teaching presence required of deep and meaningful learning outcomes.

    Built upon the theoretical framework of the Community of Inquiry – the premise that higher education is both a collaborative and individually constructivist learning experience – the authors present seven principles that provide a valuable set of tools for harnessing the opportunities for teaching and learning available through technology. Focusing on teaching practices related to the design, facilitation, direction and assessment of blended learning experiences, Teaching in Blended Learning Environments addresses the growing demand for improved teaching in higher education.

1 - 27 of 27
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