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  • 1. Ahlgren, Niklas
    et al.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Larsson, Robin
    Spacecraft Department, OHB Sweden, Sweden.
    Noteborn, Ron
    PRISMA Mission Extension: Adapting Mission Operations to New and Changing Mission Objectives2012In: SpaceOps 2012 Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PRISMA in-orbit test-bed was launched in June 2010 to demonstrate strategies and technologies for formation flying and rendezvous. OHB Sweden is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) with support from DLR, CNES, and DTU. In early September of 2011, 15 months after launch, all primary mission objectives of the PRISMA formation flying satellites had been achieved and mission success was declared. Since a significant amount of delta-V capability still remained an open call for new experiments was issued, inviting both old and new experimenters to use the capabilities of the formation. Several interested parties took the opportunity to perform their own experiments with an existing platform, each coming with new mission objectives not previously planned to be flown on the PRISMA satellites. Some of these experiments were close to what had already been achieved within the nominal mission, but some included new ways of using the formation not envisioned by the spacecraft designers. The new experiments span from data collection in specific relative orbits, with a separation from a few meters to several kilometers, to entirely new modules within the on-board software. Changing from a pre-planned technology demonstration mission to operating a commercial resource required adaptation of the original operational concept, taking into account the different levels of experience of the customers and managing the satellites between experiments. This paper describes how these new mission objectives were integrated in operations and how a sometimes very short turn-around between initial concept and experiment execution was implemented with the aid of well established validation processes, high degrees of on-board autonomy and a flexible operations team.

  • 2. Bodin, Per
    et al.
    Chasset, Camille
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Noteborn, Ron
    Nylund, Matti
    Vretblad, Örjan
    Veldman, Sytze
    Persson, Staffan
    Guidance, navigation, and control experiments on the PRISMA in-orbit test bed2007In: 58th International Astronautical Congress, IAC-07-C1, 2007, Vol. 7, p. 4461-4470Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRISMA will demonstrate Guidance, Navigation and Control strategies for advanced autonomous formation flying and rendezvous. The Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB). The project is further supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), and the French Space Agency (CNES). PRISMA consists of two spacecraft: MAIN and TARGET. The MAIN satellite is 3-axis stabilized and has full 3D delta-V maneuverability that is independent of the spacecraft's attitude. The TARGET satellite has a simplified, yet 3-axis stabilizing, magnetic attitude control system and no orbit maneuver capability. This paper presents the PRISMA Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) subsystem. The paper gives a mission summary and an overview of the GNC subsystem with its hardware and software configuration. It also explains how the orbit control functions contain advanced fuel optimal Model Predictive Control (MPC). It is shown how the GNC software is developed using model based automatic coding technology implemented with Matlab/Simulink. The paper then summarizes the different GNC experiments to be performed by SSC. Finally, an overview of the test approach for the subsystem is given.

  • 3. Bodin, Per
    et al.
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Chasset, Camille
    Noteborn, Ron
    Nylund, Matti
    PRISMA: an in-orbit test bed for guidance, navigation, and control experiments2009In: Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, ISSN 0022-4650, E-ISSN 1533-6794, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 615-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents system-level hardware-in-the-loop real-time simulation results for three different guidance, navigation, and control experiments designed for in-flight demonstration on the PRISMA formation-flying satellite mission. The mission consists of two spacecraft: Main and Target The Main satellite has full orbit control capability, whereas Target is attitude-controlled only. Launch is planned for November 2009. The simulation results presented demonstrate the feasibility and readiness for flight as well as the expected in-flight performance. The three experiments include Global Positioning System and vision-based formation flying for two spacecraft in both passive and forced motion. In addition to these simulation results, the paper gives an overview of the PRISMA mission in general and the guidance, navigation, and control experiments in particular. The hardware-in-the-loop real-time test environment is also presented.

  • 4. Bodin, Per
    et al.
    Noteborn, Ron
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation, Sweden.
    Chasset, Camille
    System test results from the GNC experiments on the PRISMA in-orbit test bed2011In: Acta Astronautica, ISSN 0094-5765, E-ISSN 1879-2030, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 862-872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PRISMA in-orbit test bed will demonstrate guidance, navigation, and control strategies for spacecraft formation flying and rendezvous. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and the prime contractor is the Swedish Space Corporation. The project is further supported by the German Aerospace Center, the Technical University of Denmark, and the French Space Agency. PRISMA was launched on June 15, 2010 and after three weeks of operations, all on-board systems and units have passed an initial commissioning phase. Separation of the two PRISMA satellites from each other is expected by mid-August 2010. PRISMA consists of two spacecraft: MAIN and TARGET. The MAIN spacecraft has full orbit control capability while TARGET is attitude controlled only. The Swedish Space Corporation is responsible for three groups of guidance, navigation, and control experiments. These experiments include GPS- and vision-based formation flying during which the spacecraft will fly in passive as well as forced motion. The three experiments are: autonomous formation flying, proximity operations with final approach/recede maneuvers, and autonomous rendezvous. This paper presents system test results from two of these experiments as obtained with the flight-ready system. The system tests consist of a series of simulations performed on the flight model spacecraft with a large amount of hardware in the loop.

  • 5. Bodin, Per
    et al.
    Noteborn, Ron
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden AB, AOCS & SW Dept, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Thomas
    D’Amico, Simone
    Ardaens, Jean Sebastien
    Delpech, Michel
    Berges, Jean-Claude
    The Prisma Formation Flying Demonstrator: Overview and Conclusions from the Nominal Mission2012In: Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, ISSN 0065-3438, Vol. 144, p. 441-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PRISMA in-orbit testbed was launched on June 15, 2010 to demonstrate strategies and technologies for formation flying and rendezvous. OHB Sweden (OHB-SE) is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board with additional support from the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the French National Space Center (CNES), and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). In August 2011, PRISMA completed its nominal mission and during the fall of 2011, several additional activities have been performed under a mission extension program. The mission qualifies a series of sensor and actuator systems including navigation using GPS, Vision Based and RF technology as well as a propulsion system based on environmentally friendly propellant technology. The mission also includes a series of GNC experiments using this equipment in closed loop. Separate experiments are implemented by OHB-SE, DLR, and CNES and the paper provides an overview and conclusions from the nominal mission flight results from these experiments.

  • 6. Chapuis, T
    et al.
    Guidotti, P Y
    Delpech, M
    Queyrut, O
    Harr, J
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Carlsson, Anna
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden, Sweden.
    FFIORD Architecture and Operational Concepts2010In: Proceedings of DASIA 2010 Data Systems In Aerospace, by Ouwehand, L. ESA-SP 682, 2010, Vol. 682Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the architecture and the operational concepts of the Formation Flying In Orbit Ranging Demonstation experiment (FFIORD) which is part of the PRISMA mission. This technological experiment, lead by CNES, is based on a specific Radio Frequency subsystem manufactured by Thales Alenia Space. The objectives are to assess the performances of the Flying Formation RF sensor (FFRF) and to validate the algorithms developed for various Formation Flying scenarios.

  • 7. Chasset, Camille
    et al.
    Noteborn, Ron
    Bodin, Per
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB-Sweden, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Björn
    3-Axis magnetic control: flight results of the TANGO satellite in the PRISMA mission2013In: CEAS Space Journal, ISSN 1868-2502, E-ISSN 1868-2510, Vol. 5, no 1-2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRISMA implements guidance, navigation and control strategies for advanced formation flying and rendezvous experiments. The project is funded by the Swedish National Space Board and run by OHB-Sweden in close cooperation with DLR, CNES and the Danish Technical University. The PRISMA test bed consists of a fully manoeuvrable MANGO satellite as well as a 3-axis controlled TANGO satellite without any ΔV capability. PRISMA was launched on the 15th of June 2010 on board DNEPR. The TANGO spacecraft is the reference satellite for the experiments performed by MANGO, either with a "cooperative" or "non-cooperative" behaviour. Small, light and low-cost were the keywords for the TANGO design. The attitude determination is based on Sun sensors and magnetometers, and the active attitude control uses magnetic torque rods only. In order to perform the attitude manoeuvres required to fulfil the mission objectives, using any additional gravity gradient boom to passively stabilize the spacecraft was not allowed. After a two-month commissioning phase, TANGO separated from MANGO on the 11th of August 2010. All operational modes have been successfully tested, and the pointing performance in flight is in accordance with expectations. The robust Sun Acquisition mode reduced the initial tip-off rate and placed TANGO into a safe attitude in <30 min. The Manual Pointing mode was commissioned, and the spacecraft demonstrated the capability to follow or maintain different sets of attitudes. In Sun/Zenith Pointing mode, TANGO points its GPS antenna towards zenith with sufficient accuracy to track as many GPS satellites as MANGO. At the same time, it points its solar panel towards the Sun, and all payload equipments can be switched on without any restriction. This paper gives an overview of the TANGO Attitude Control System design. It then presents the flight results in the different operating modes. Finally, it highlights the key elements at the origin of the successful 3-axis magnetic control strategy on the TANGO satellite.

  • 8. D'Amico, Simone
    et al.
    Ardaens, J S
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden, Sweden.
    In-flight demonstration of formation control based on relative orbital elements2011In: 4th International Conference on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions & Technologies, 2011, p. 18-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental objective of the PRISMA mission is to respond to the increasing demand of autonomous formation flying and on-orbit servicing technology through the in-flight demonstration of novel guidance, navigation and control (GNC) techniques. This paper addresses one of the primary experiments conducted in the frame of the PRISMA mission to demonstrate broad autonomous formation keeping and reconfiguration capabilities on a routine basis using GPS navigation, relative orbital elements, and impulsive control. After a brief introduction of the adopted formation flying concept and its key algorithms, the paper focuses on the experiment planning, operations and its performance in orbit. The obtained results show the high readiness of the developed spaceborne GNC technology and pave the way for its adoption in future advanced multi-satellite missions for remote sensing.

  • 9. D’Amico, Simone
    et al.
    Ardaens, J-S
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Spaceborne autonomous formation-flying experiment on the PRISMA mission2012In: Journal of Guidance Control and Dynamics, ISSN 0731-5090, E-ISSN 1533-3884, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 834-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Prototype Research Instruments and Space Mission Technology Advancement (PRISMA) represents the first European technology demonstration of formation-flying and on-orbit-servicing techniques. Several hardware and software experiments, either at subsystem or system levels, have been successfully conducted since the launch of the dual-satellite mission in June 2010. This paper describes the guidance, navigation, and control functionalities and presents key flight results from the so-called Spaceborne Autonomous Formation-Flying Experiment (SAFE) executed in September 2010 and March 2011 as one of the primary PRISMA mission objectives. SAFE is intended to demonstrate autonomous acquisition, keeping, and reconfiguration of passive relative orbits for advanced remotesensing and rendezvous applications. As shown in the paper, the onboard Global Positioning System navigation system provides relative orbit information in real time with an accuracy better than 10 cm and 1 mm/s (three-dimensional, root mean square) in position and velocity, respectively. The impulsive formation control achieves accuracies better than 10 m (three-dimensional, root mean square) for separations below 2 km with minimum usage of thrusters, ensuring high predictability for simplified mission operations and minimum collision risk for increased safety.

  • 10. D'Amico, Simone
    et al.
    De Florio, S
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden, Swseden.
    Nylund, Matti
    Autonomous formation keeping and reconfiguration for remote sensing spacecraft2009In: 21st International Symposium on Space Flight Dynamics, 2009, Vol. 28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is devoted to the realistic demonstration of a complete Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system for formation flying spacecraft in Low Earth orbit (LEO). Numerous technical novelties in the areas of formation flying guidance, GPS-based relative navigation, and impulsive relative orbit control have made this possible, but the primary contribution of this research work stems from the design and implementation of a comprehensive formation flying system through the successful integration of various techniques. This research has led to the full development, testing and validation of the GNC flight code to be embedded in the on-board computer of the Main spacecraft of the Swedish PRISMA technology demonstration. Furthermore key guidance and control algorithms presented here are going to be demonstrated for the first time on-board the German TanDEM-X formation flying mission. Overall this paper focuses on realistic application cases closely related to upcoming formation flying missions. The intention is to realize a practical and reliable way to a technology which is discussed and studied since decades but is still confined in research laboratories. Hardwarein- the-loop real-time simulations including flight computers show that simple techniques, which exploit the natural orbit motion to full extent, can meet the demanding requirements of the long-term close formation flying.

  • 11. D’Amico, Simone
    et al.
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation (SSC), Sweden.
    Navigation and Control of the PRISMA Formation: In-Orbit Experience2012In: Journal of Mechanics Engineering and Automation, ISSN 2159-5275, E-ISSN 2159-5283, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 312-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents flight results and lessons learned from the Spaceborne Autonomous Formation Flying Experiment (SAFE) conducted by the German Space Operations Center in the frame of the Swedish PRISMA mission. SAFE represents one of the first demonstrations in low Earth orbit of an advanced guidance, navigation and control system for dual-spacecraft formations. Innovative techniques based on carrier-phase differential GPS, relative eccentricity/inclination vectors and impulsive maneuvering are validated and tuned in orbit to achieve centimeter accurate real-time relative navigation, reliable formation keeping at the meter level and flexible formation reconfiguration capabilities.

  • 12. D'Amico, Simone
    et al.
    Montenbruck, Oliver
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation (SSC), Sweden .
    Chasset, Camille
    GPS-based relative navigation during the separation sequence of the PRISMA formation2008In: AIAA guidance, navigation and control conference and exhibit, Honolulu, Hawai, 2008, p. 18-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRISMA is a Swedish-led micro-satellite mission that serves as a test platform for autonomous formation flying and rendezvous of spacecraft. It comprises two satellites which are launched together in a clamped configuration and separated in orbit after completion of all checkout operations. The challenge of the subsequent early operations phase is to maintain the formation safety and in particular to minimize the risk of collision using only a reduced subset of the overall guidance, navigation and control functionalities. While not specifically designed for safe mode operations, the PRISMA GPS-based relative navigation system is still considered the best source of relative orbit information during this mission phase. A comprehensive simulation of the separation sequence has been therefore conducted that demonstrates the robust operation of the GPS navigation system under the adverse conditions of the separation event and the subsequent non-nominal spacecraft attitude. While initially based on offline Simulink/C++ software simulations, the employed test approach makes use of the prototype flight software for the GPS navigation system and enables a seamless transition to real-time software simulations as well as hardware-in-the-loop simulations.

  • 13. Delpech, M
    et al.
    Malbet, F
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Larsson, Robin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing. OHB Sweden.
    Léger, A
    Jorgensen, J
    Flight demonstration of formation flying capabilities for future missions (NEAT Pathfinder)2014In: Acta Astronautica, ISSN 0094-5765, E-ISSN 1879-2030, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 82-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRISMA is a demonstration mission for formation-flying and on-orbit-servicing critical technologies that involves two spacecraft launched in low Earth orbit in June 2010 and still in operation. Funded by the Swedish National Space Board, PRISMA mission has been developed by OHB-Sweden (formerly Swedish Space Corporation) with important contributions from the German Aerospace Centre (DLR/GSOC), the French Space Agency (CNES), and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The paper focuses on the last CNES experiment achieved in September 2012 that was devoted to the preparation of future astrometry missions illustrated by the NEAT and mu-NEAT mission concepts. The experiment consisted of performing the type of formation maneuvers required to point the two-satellite axis to a celestial target and maintain it fixed during the observation period. Achieving inertial pointing for a LEO formation represented a new challenge given the numerous constraints from propellant usage to star tracker blinding. The paper presents the experiment objectives in relation with the NEAT/mu-NEAT mission concept, describes its main design features along with the guidance and control algorithms evolutions and discusses the results in terms of performances achieved during the two rehearsals.

  • 14. Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Björn
    Bodin, Per
    The PRISMA story: Achievements and final escapades2013In: 5th International Conference on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions & Technologies, Munich, Germany, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Prisma mission is divided into four phases; the nominal mission, the extended mission, the external parties’ mission and the final mission. The milestones switching from one phase to the next are unique occasions that have brought the mission forward, whereof some were planned before the launch of the satellites and some were adaptations along with the development of the mission timeline. In particular, the current execution of the final phase contains Mango alone operation, which means Mango has abandoned Tango and has started a journey on its own for transfer to and rendezvous with a still to be decided space debris object. The rendezvous will be performed based upon TLE and angular measurements from the on-board camera and after the rendezvous a visual inspection and characterization of the object will be performed, utilizing the on board high resolution PR camera. This paper explains these milestones and the turn of events leading up to the events that were not planned. It also describes the past mission phases in a broader sense and the current final phase in more detail.

  • 15. Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB-SE.
    Jakobsson, Björn
    Bodin, Per
    Larsson, Bengt
    PRISMA IRIDES: PERFORMANCE AT THE END OF THE DRIFT PHASE & PLANNED RENDEZVOUS EXPERIMENTS2014In: 9th International ESA Conference on Guidance, Navigation & Control Systems, Oporto, Portugal, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PRISMA was launched on June 15, 2010 to demonstrate strategies and technologies for formation flying and rendezvous. OHB Sweden is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board with additional support from DLR, CNES, and DTU.PRISMA consists of two spacecraft: Mango and Tango. The Mango spacecraft is 3-axis stabilized and has a propulsion system providing full 3D orbit control. Tango is 3-axis stabilized with a solar magnetic control system and does not have orbit control capability. The two spacecraft were launched clamped together into a 700 km SSO and Tango was successfully separated from Mango on August 11, 2010.In April 2013, when both the nominal and extended mission phases were successfully completed, new objectives were assigned to the Mango spacecraft and the Tango spacecraft was shut down permanently. An eighteen month journey was started towards a new, non-cooperative space object to demonstrate rendezvous and inspection within an experiment called IRIDES (Iterative Reduction of Inspection Distance with Embedded Safety). The baseline rendezvous target is Picard.Since the start of IRIDES, the Mango spacecraft has completed a large series of optimized orbit manoeuvres that has put the spacecraft on a drift towards the new object. The rendezvous is expected in the second half of 2014 and will demonstrate optical relative navigation technologies and the characterization of the rendezvous object and its motion with the use of the on-board video system. The rendezvous strategy within IRIDES includes a series of collision free drift manoeuvres past the rendezvous object successively reducing the closest relative distance. The demonstrated technologies for this rendezvous are believed to play an important role in the future developments associated with space debris mitigation.The paper gives a brief introduction to PRISMA including a retrospective of the different achievements made in the mission. The paper then describes the optimized orbit manoeuvres made to acquire the drift orbit. The status of the drift finalization is then given where the initial manoeuvres performed to finalize the drift are described. The final part of the paper describes the planned activities within the rendezvous phase with focus on the IRIDES experiment.

  • 16. Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    Berge, Sten
    Bodin, Per
    Jönsson, Ulf T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Optimization and Systems Theory.
    Fuel efficient relative orbit control strategies for formation flying and rendezvous within PRISMA2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article will outline the relative orbit control, including guidance and control tasks developed for the PRISMA technology in-orbit formation flying testbed mission. The focus is on real-time implementable solutions, working in arbitrary orbits (0 ≤ e < 1). The algorithms presented are based on linear Model Predictive Control(MPC). The computational heavy part of a MPC approach is usually to setup the matrices, associated with the linear program, if zero order hold discretization methods are used. This article introduces a different approach which uses the state transition matrices developed in [1], that accommodate steps of arbitrary length. This approach allows much larger time steps than the time varying dynamics would allow when zero order hold discretizing the dynamics. The computational complexity will instead depend on the number of state constraints and the number of allowed control inputs. These two factors can be designed to meet real-time execution requirements. The initial tests show that the expected ΔV consumption compares well to previous works in this area with only a small fraction of the computational load. To date, a version of the control algorithm for the Proximity Operations has been implemented and successfully demonstrated in real-time on flight representative hardware as a part of SSC's demonstration at the 6th International ESA Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems. The maximum processor load increase over one second was about 3%, on a Leon2 processor running at 32 MHz, with code not optimized for computational efficiency.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    Swedish Space Corporation, Sweden.
    D'Amico, Simone
    Noteborn, Ron
    Bodin, Per
    GPS navigation based proximity operations by the PRISMA satellites-flight results2011In: 4th International Conference on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions & Technologies, 2011, p. 18-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents flight results and lessons learned from the Proximity FormationFlying experiment developed and executed by SSC on the Swedish PRISMA mission.The paper will cover the design, flight results, operational aspects as well as lessonslearned. Proximity operations in PRISMA consist of forced-motion flight of Mangoaround Tango in the ranges from about 50 m down to 2 m. The forced motion is eitherdirectly around Tango or around a virtual structure defined about the Tango spacecraft.The purpose of the virtual structure is to mimic the circumflight about a large object withappendages and no-fly zones, such as the International Space Station (ISS).

  • 18. Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    Mueller, Joseph
    Thomas, Stephanie
    Jakobsson, Björn
    Bodin, Per
    Orbit constellation safety on the PRISMA in-orbit formation flying testbed2008In: 3rd International Symposium on Formation Flying, Missions and Technologies, ESA, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    Noteborn, Ron
    Bodin, Per
    D'Amico, Simone
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Carlsson, Anna
    Autonomous formation flying in LEO–seven months of routine formation flying with frequent reconfigurations2011In: 4th international conference on spacecraft formation flying missions and technologies, St-Hubert, Quebec, 2011, p. 18-20Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    Swedish Space Corporation.
    Noteborn, Ron
    Chasset, Camille
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Carlsson, Anna
    Persson, Staffan
    Bodin, Per
    Flight Results from SSC'€™s GNC Experiments within the PRISMA Formation Flying Mission2010In: 61st International Astronautical Congress, 2010, Vol. 7, p. 6032-6041Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PRISMA in-orbit test-bed was launched on June 15, 2010. The mission will demonstrate strategies and technologies for formation flying and rendezvous. The Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) with additional support from the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the French National Space Center (CNES) and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). The PRISMA mission consists of two spacecraft: Mango and Tango. The Mango spacecraft is 3-axis stabilized and is equipped with a propulsion system providing full 3D orbit control capability. Tango is also 3-axis stabilized but with a simplified solar magnetic control system. The Tango spacecraft does not have any orbit control capability. The two spacecraft were launched clamped together into a 700 km altitude sun synchronous dawn-dusk orbit. After an initial commissioning campaign, Tango was separated from Mango on August 11. The mission includes the flight qualification of a series of sensor and actuator systems as well as the in-flight execution of a range of GNC experiments using this equipment. The spacecraft are equipped with Vision Based, GPS, RF-sensor navigation systems and has three different types of propulsion. The different GNC experiments are conducted by the participating organizations and this paper focuses on SSCs experiments. These consist of Autonomous Formation Flying, Proximity Operations with Final Approach/Recede Maneuvers, and Autonomous Rendezvous. By the beginning of September 2010, all essential equipment on the two satellites has been fully commissioned and the initial parts of the Autonomous Formation Flying have been initiated. The Autonomous Formation Flying is demonstrating aspects of flight in passive relative orbits and the transfer between different such orbits. The navigation is based on GPS and the control framework is linear Model Predictive Control (MPC) implemented for an arbitrary orbit, including eccentric orbits. This paper will focus on these earliest results from SSCs GNC experiments. The paper also contains a brief PRISMA system description and an overview of the GNC subsystem together with the SSCs GNC experiments.

  • 21.
    Larsson, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Information Science and Engineering.
    Skog, Isaac
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Information Science and Engineering.
    Händel, Peter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Information Science and Engineering.
    Inertial Sensor Driven Smartphone and Automobile Coordinate System Alignment2017In: 2017 IEEE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITSC), IEEE , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a method is presented for estimating the orientation of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) located within an automobile, using only the measurements from the IMU itself. The orientation estimation problem is posed as a non-linear filtering probletn, which is solved using a marginalized particle filter. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using a large collection of real-world data, collected by multiple drivers. The drivers used their own smartphones and had no restrictions on smartphone handling during drives. The orientation accuracy achieved with the proposed method is in the order of a few degrees; 50% of cases were below 5 degrees and 90% of cases were below 20 degrees.

  • 22. Matko, Drago
    et al.
    Rodič, Toma\vz
    Bla\vzič, Sašo
    Marsetič, Aleš
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden AB.
    Clacey, Eric
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Oštir, Krištof
    Mušič, Gašper
    Teslić, Luka
    Klančar, Gregor
    Lessons learned from Space-SI Experiments on PRisma Mission2013In: 45th International Conference on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions & Technologies, Munich, Germany, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the paper several lessons learned from the set of formation flying experiments, performed by the Slovenian Centre of Excellence for Space Sciences and Technologies (Space-SI) and OHB Sweden with Prisma Mango (for Main) and Tango (for Target) satellites in September 2011, are reviewed. First experiment performed was In-flight simulated radar interferometry where one satellite simulated SAR transmitter and receiver, and the other receiver only. Second experiment was the Observation of non-co-operative objects - space debris. On the basis of the space debris Two Line Elements, Mango was reoriented to point the Mango’s vision based camera towards the point of closest approach and several images were taken in a sequence. A challenging task is the close observation of the space debris. In our experiment Tango was simulating the debris and its 3D model was reconstructed from the shots taken by Mango. Next lesson was learned from the In-flight simulated distributed instrument where Tango was acting as the holder of the optical system with lenses and/or mirrors while Mango was acting as the holder of detectors. The last but not the least lesson learned from the experiments was acquired from the critical evaluation of formation flying models.

  • 23. Matko, Drago
    et al.
    Rodič, Toma\vz
    Bla\vzič, Sašo
    Marsetič, Aleš
    Oštir, Krištof
    Mušič, Gašper
    Teslić, Luka
    Klančar, Gregor
    Peljhan, Marko
    Zobavnik, David
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB Sweden AB.
    Clacey, Eric
    Svärd, Christian
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Validation of Astrodynamic Formation Flying Models Against SPACE-SI Experiments with Prisma Satellites2012In: 26th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites, Logan, Utah, USA, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper several astrodynamical formation flying models are assessed against the experimental results derived from the SPACE-SI formation flying experiments performed in September 2011 with the OHB Sweden developed Prisma satellites Mango and Tango. In these formation flying experiments critical manoeuvres for three types of missions were investigated with respect to in-orbit performances. The experiments included parallel flying with in track displacement demonstrating high-resolution optical dual satellite imaging and radar interferometric constellation, circumvolution as well as encircling of the target demonstrating debris observation and parallel flying with the radial displacement demonstrating fractionated spacecraft and accurate pointing of the formation. The astrodynamic data of the experiment are used to verify several formation flying models including a nonlinear model, a linear Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire model, STK models with four propagators (Earth mass point, J2, default HPOP and HPOP with all disturbances) and the hereby originally proposed extension to the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire model, a linear model for orbits with small eccentricities.

  • 24. Mueller, Joseph B
    et al.
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation, Sweden.
    Collision avoidance maneuver planning with robust optimization2008In: International ESA Conference on Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems, Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, a growing number of space missions have emerged which are utilizing distributed systemsof satellites. This is accompanied by a rising level of interest in both the scientific and defense communitiesto develop mature systems and software for autonomous rendezvous and formation flying. An underlyingrequirement for these types of missions is the need to ensure safe, collision-free operations.The PRISMA mission, to be launched in 2009, will demonstrate Guidance, Navigation, and Controlstrategies for advanced autonomous formation flying between two spacecraft. The Swedish Space Corporation(SSC) is the prime contractor for the project which is funded by the Swedish National Space Board(SNSB). The safe guidance mode, based upon algorithms developed by Princeton Satellite Systems (PSS)under a CRADA, will be an integral part of the PRISMA mission. Its role is to plan a collision avoidancemaneuver if the relative distance is too small, and to continually plan relative station-keeping maneuvers tokeep the spacecraft on a safe relative trajectory.One important requirement of the safe guidance algorithms for PRISMA is that they guarantee reliableplans immediately, which led to the choice of completely deterministic methods. In this paper, we consideralternative numerical methods that are appropriate for the online computation of collision avoidance maneuvers.In particular, we discuss how to pose the original non-convex problem as a linear programming(LP) problem, using a combination of well-defined convex constraints. We go on to show how navigationuncertainty can be included in the LP formulation, enabling the efficient solution of robust, fuel optimal maneuvers.

  • 25. Noteborn, Ron
    et al.
    Bodin, Per
    Larsson, Robin
    Chasset, Camille
    Flight results from the PRISMA optical line of sight based autonomous rendezvous experiment2011In: 4th international conference on spacecraft formation flying missions & technologies, St-Hubert, Quebec, 2011, p. 18-20Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Nylund, Matti
    et al.
    Bodin, Per
    Chasset, Camille
    Larsson, Robin
    Swedish Space Corporation, Sweden.
    Noteborn, Ron
    SATSIM an advanced real-time multi satellite simulator handling GPS in closed-loop tests2011In: 4th International Conference on Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions & Technologies, Montréal, Canada, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Pokrupa, Nils
    et al.
    Ahlgren, Niklas
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Bodin, Per
    Larsson, Robin
    OHB-SE.
    One Year of In-Flight Results from the Prisma Formation Flying Demonstration Mission2011In: 25th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Prisma smallsat in-orbit test-bed was launched on the 15th of June, 2010 to demonstrate strategies and technologies for formation flying and rendezvous. The mission consists of two spacecraft: Mango and Tango. Mango is 3-axis stabilized and is equipped with a propulsion system providing full 3D orbit control capability. Tango has a simplified solar magnetic control system and does not have any orbit control capability. The two spacecraft were launched clamped together into a 720/780 km altitude sun synchronous dawn-dusk orbit, and later separated in August of 2010. Since then, the two spacecraft, and rather lean operations team, have been performing a steady march through a tight mission and experiment timeline. This paper gives an overview of the Prisma mission in general and will focus on the lessons that have been learned from running a relatively intense, yet lean, small satellite technology demonstration mission. It has proven to show the value of autonomy and small platform applications, allowing for a high return on effort. Spacecraft autonomy and small, highly competent teams have allowed for quick and cost effective adaptations to changes and problem situations. The broad range of flight results from only one year in operation support these conclusions.

  • 28.
    Wahlström, Johan
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Dept Comp Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England..
    Skog, Isaac
    Linköping Univ, Dept Elect Engn, S-58183 Linköping, Sweden.
    Nordström, Robin Larsson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Information Science and Engineering. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Händel, Peter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Information Science and Engineering. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Fusion of OBD and GNSS Measurements of Speed2018In: IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement, ISSN 0018-9456, E-ISSN 1557-9662, Vol. 67, no 7, p. 1659-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are two primary sources of sensor measurements for driver behavior profiling within insurance telematics and fleet management. The first is the on-board diagnostics system, typically found within most modern cars. The second is the global navigation satellite system, whose associated receivers commonly are embedded into smartphones or off-the-shelf telematics devices. In this paper, we present maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for the problem of fusing speed measurements from these two sources to jointly estimate a vehicle's speed and the scale factor of the wheel speed sensors. In addition, we analyze the performance of the estimators by use of the Cramer-Rao bound, and discuss the estimation of model parameters describing measurement errors and vehicle dynamics. Last, simulations and real-world data are used to show that the proposed estimators yield a substantial performance gain compared to when employing only one of the two measurement sources.

1 - 28 of 28
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