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  • 1. Govaerts, S.
    et al.
    Bogdanov, E.
    Gillet, D.
    Verbert, K.
    Isaksson, Erik
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Dahrendorf, D.
    Ullrich, C.
    Scheffel, M.
    Rojas, S. L.
    Lessons learned from the development of the role ple framework2015In: Responsive Open Learning Environments: Outcomes of Research from the Role Project, Springer, 2015, p. 185-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the ROLE European research project, an interoperability framework has been developed to support self-regulated learning and to enable learners and teachers to create personal learning environments (PLEs). This framework enables learners to assemble tools, services and resources together to create their own custom learning environment. This chapter discusses the overall architecture, the specific components of this architecture and the platforms in which we have integrated the ROLE framework. Additionally, we share the lessons learned from the design and development. Furthermore, we discuss our experience with the ROLE development infrastructure and our collaboration within the ROLE development team and with several open-source projects.

  • 2.
    Isaksson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Smart interactions for the quantified self2018In: Challenges and Solutions in Smart Learning: Proceeding of 2018 International Conference on Smart Learning Environments, Beijing, China, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Quantified Self is a movement for collecting personal data with the goal of providing possibilities for new insights through reflecting on own relevant data, with applications in areas such as physical exercise, food, and health. When collecting personal data, difficulties may arise, such as information from different sources which cannot easily be combined, closed access to information sources, inflexible tooling for producing desired quantifications, varying precision of data used for producing quantifications, and a lack of control over data sharing for supporting relevant comparisons with others. In this paper, we introduce the concept of smart interactions, backed by linked data, as a means of introducing the QS through smart and personal learning environments, both for reducing the associated difficulties and further empowering the QS.

  • 3.
    Isaksson, Erik
    et al.
    Department for Library services, Language and ARC, KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Library, Publication Infrastructure. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Lefrere, Paul
    Performance Augmentation Through Ubiquitous and Adaptive Learning and Work Environments2016In: STATE-OF-THE-ART AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS OF SMART LEARNING, Springer, 2016, p. 315-319Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent and upcoming devices such as tablets and wearables in combination with technologies such as the Internet of Things are resulting in learning environments becoming of an increasingly ubiquitous nature. Learning environments are now more strongly embedded in real-world learning and work activities, causing the boundaries between virtual learning environments and their real-world contexts of use, and between learning and work activities themselves, to be increasingly blurred. A reconceptualization of learning environments as performance augmentation means that the function of enhancement or augmentation is made explicit. Theoretical, modeling, and implementation aspects of performance augmentation through ubiquitous and adaptive learning and work environments are explored.

  • 4.
    Isaksson, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Lefrere, Paul
    Wild, Fridolin
    Towards a Reference Architecture for Smart and Personal Learning Environments2017In: INNOVATIONS IN SMART LEARNING, Springer-Verlag New York, 2017, p. 79-88Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal learning environments (PLEs) evolved as a response to the limitations on self-regulated learning posed by institutional control of learning environments, such as Learning Management Systems. Smart learning environments (SLEs) have more recently come to refer to various technological enhancements of learning environments. However, there is a tension between 'personal' and 'smart', which this paper investigates through the experiences of the TELL ME project. The project focused on the learning of blue-collar workers in Europe's manufacturing sector. The resulting aim was to support the awareness of ` intentions' and ` realizations' and the reciprocities between these across five phases, collectively referred to as MEMO-E: mix, enquire, match, optimize, and experience. Perspectives of the project on the themes, interactions, and philosophy of SLEs and PLEs are explained, a framework for intentions and realizations is introduced, and the characteristics of an evolvable reference architecture for smart and personal learning environments are presented.

  • 5.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Isaksson, Erik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    TEL - What is it good for?2015In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 2015, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is the use of technology to enhance and enrich learning situations or learning experiences. At the conference we will argue that research in TEL is needed in order to assess and gain knowledge under which circumstances the use of certain technologies will enhance the learning experience. The use of the word technology is here to be understood in a broad sense and includes both analog and digital technology, see McLuhan that described technology as any extension of ourselves [1]. With this view of technology, several analog milestones in the history of learning such as the alphabet, books, pencils and paper is to be considered uses of TEL. Furthermore, the research field of TEL should not be restricted to digital or electronic technologies, which could narrow our view of what could be accomplished. This view further implies that electronic-learning e-learning) becomes a subset of TEL. From an activity theory perspective TEL can be seen as the use of technology as a mediating artifact or tool) for enhancing learning in various kinds of activities, either in formal or informal learning situations [2]. Vygotsky [3] introduced the one of proximal development as the difference between what a learner can do without help, and what she can do with help. TEL is intended to provide the learner with such help, which then goes beyond helping to learn but also helping to do i.e., carrying out tasks, whether in a classroom or at work). This help can be regarded as an augmentation of performance, as well as of learning. To conclude, technology can be used to enhance and enrich the learning experience and the learning situation as an extension to ourselves or as a mediating artifact with the intention to expand the of proximal development. The mission of research in TEL is to contribute to the knowledge about under which circumstances the use of (a certain) technology will enhance the learning experience.

    *McLuhan uses the words medium, media and technology interchangeably.

  • 6. Vieritz, H.
    et al.
    von der Heiden, B.
    Ullrich, C.
    Shen, R.
    Isaksson, Erik
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Library, Publication Infrastructure.
    Schmitz, H. -C
    Borau, K.
    Palmér, M.
    Lind, T.
    Laaksoharju, M.
    Case study 1: Using widget bundles for formal learning in higher education2015In: Responsive Open Learning Environments: Outcomes of Research from the Role Project, Springer, 2015, p. 79-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Formal learning in higher education creates its own challenges for didactics, teaching, technology, and organization. The growing need for well-educated employees requires new ideas and tools in education. Within the ROLE project, three personal learning environments based on ROLE technology were used to accompany “traditional” teaching and learning activities at universities. The test beds at the RWTH Aachen University in Germany, the School of Continuing Education of Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and the Uppsala University in Sweden differ in learning culture, the number of students and their individual background, synchronous versus distant learning, etc. The big range of test beds underlines the flexibility of ROLE technology. For each test bed, the learning scenario is presented and analyzed as well as the particular ROLE learning environment. The evaluation methods are described and the research results discussed in detail. The learned lessons provide an easy way to benefit from the ROLE research work which demonstrates the potential for new ideas based on flexible e-learning concepts and tools in “traditional” education. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and the Author(s) 2015.

  • 7. Wild, F.
    et al.
    Scott, P.
    Lefrere, P.
    Karjalainen, J.
    Helin, K.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Isaksson, Erik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Towards data exchange formats for learning experiences in manufacturing workplaces2014In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, 2014, p. 23-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing industries are currently transforming, most notably through the introduction of advanced machinery and increasing degrees of automation. This has caused a shift in skills required, calling for a skills gap to be filled. Learning technology needs to embrace this change and with this contribution, we propose a process model for learning by experience to understand and explain learning under these changed conditions. To put this process into practice, we propose two interchange formats for capturing, sharing, and re-enacting pervasive learning activities and for describing workplaces with involved things, persons, places, devices, apps, and their set-up.

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