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  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Kommer det på tentan?: Uppfattningar om motivation och demotivation bland studenter på ingenjörsutbildningar2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation är en av de viktigaste drivkrafterna bakom människors handlingar. Hur en student klarar sina studier beror till stor del på graden av motivation, men också på graden av demotivation. Vi har i den här studien valt att utforska upplevda källor till studenters motivation och demotivation i ingenjörskurser. Dessa har kodats och kategoriserats i termer av kontext, struktur och lärare, och resultatet har jämförts med en liknande omfattande undersökning från USA. Resultaten visar att frågor rörande kurs ens struktur i högre grad anges som viktiga både för motivation och demotivation för våra studentgrupper, jämfört med den andra undersökningen. Vidare förekommer synpunkter kring lärarens förmåga att förklara och lärarens attityd till studenterna i betydligt högre omfattning än lärarens ämneskompetens i sig, vilket kan ses som stöd för att pedagogisk och didaktisk skicklighet bör vara starkt meriterande för undervisande personal. En slutsats är att lärare har mycket stora möjligheter att påverka studenternas motivation både positivt och negativt, och att det är av stor vikt att lärare är både medvetna om, och har verktyg för att hantera, detta.

     

  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Will this be on the exam?: Or, How to Motivate your Students to Learn2017In: KTH SoTL 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. KTH.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. KTH.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    The pedagogical developers initiative - development, implementation and lessons learned from a systematic approach to faculty development2016In: Proceedings of the 12th International CDIO Conference, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland, June 12-16, 2016, Turku University , 2016, p. 497-508Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic, university--wide approach to creating an encompassing movement towards faculty development. In 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology launched the pedagogical developers initiative, appointing part--time pedagogical developers among teachers from all schools of KTH, to implement and strengthen good teaching and learning practices among faculty and students. They are teachers active in different educational programmes, with experience of, and interest in, pedagogical issues. In line with CDIO standard 10, the purpose of the pedagogical developers’ initiative is to facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange between faculty members, and to establish communities of practice. The paper presents the activities, processes for developing these activities and preliminary results from the initiative’s second year, which focused much on supporting faculty development by putting into place a series of workshops, a format chosen for its combination of active community-building learning and time efficiency. The topics of the workshops emerged to meet faculty needs identified by the pedagogical developers during the first year. The workshops were created by smaller teams of pedagogical developers from different schools of KTH. This enabled a wide array of experiences and perspectives to be incorporated into the workshops. Main focuses of the workshops have been on creating internal discussions in dynamic communities of practice on specific subjects of interest, and on creating forums for exchange of ideas, open to the whole faculty. During Autumn 2015, the workshops have been offered as voluntary add-on parts of the basic course in teaching and learning offered to faculty at KTH. This first round of workshops generated a positive interest from teachers, and participant feedback indicates that they particularly appreciated the opportunity to work directly with their own courses and the opportunity to discuss pedagogical aspects with peers. 

  • 5.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Johansson, Hans Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soulard, Juliette
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electrical Energy Conversion.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Changing Educational Practices and Strengthening CDIO skills2015In: Proceedings of the 11th International CDIO Conference, Chengdu, China, June 8-11 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper put emphasis on change agents within the universities and how local initiatives can be systematically approached and ramped up. Rooted in the challenges and constraints that have been addressed in past educational program initiatives, the case consists of specific focus areas to leverage impact. Universities continuously strives to provide the best conditions for an inspiring and prosperous learning environment, and to provide educational programs with teaching of excellent educational quality. KTH is no exception and therefore the university management has initiated a pedagogical program starting in 2014. One of the first thing initiated within the framework of this pedagogical program is the creation of a group of 24 pedagogical developers.

    The focus for the pedagogical developers is to facilitate the opportunities for KTHs faculty to work together and create consensus on educational development in different teaching teams. This paper presents the University's pedagogical developers' initiative as a whole and how this has been outlined in detail to reach specific redesign targets. The School of Industrial Engineering and Management pedagogical group consists of five practicing teachers that besides this new role also engage heavily in various courses of the School's departments. Since the pedagogical initiative is aligned with several important CDIO aspects, e.g. the learning environment, formats of formative feedback, assessment and examination there is also importance to reassure this in the existing Master level programs.

    At KTH the five-year comprehensive Master of Science in Engineering programs concern distinct vocational educations in which the CDIO aspects are very important. At the same time the programs has been divided in a basic level (B.Sc. in Engineering) of three years and a advanced level (M.Sc.) of two years. This has for instance made it harder to align the progression between first cycle level and second cycle level regarding for instance the CDIO efforts (e.g. oral and written communication, teamwork). This paper will therefore discuss and enhance how the pedagogical programme, we as pedagogical developers, can support and strengthen the initiation and implementation of the CDIO aspects in the education.

  • 6.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Certifikat för global kompetens: Ett utbildningspaket för programstudenter på Kungliga Tekniska högskolan.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Fluid Modernity: Wine in China2019In: The Globalization of Wine / [ed] David Inglis & Anna-Mari Almila, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Hjelm, Niclas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Berglund, Anders
    The Pedagogical Developers Initiative – Sustainable Impact of Falling into Oblivion?2018In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference / [ed] Bean Bennedsen, Edström, Hugo, Roslöf, Songer & Yamamoto, Kanazawa: Kanazawa Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 738-747Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 2014-16, KTH Royal Institute of Technology set aside considerable resources in its biggest pedagogical project to date, the Pedagogical Developers Initiative. The project has been continuously reported on at recent CDIO conferences. While aimed primarily at CDIO Standard 10, enhancement of faculty teaching competence, the project managed, by design as much as through accident, to strengthen many CDIO standards and syllabus items. With the conclusion of the project, the constructive practices and ideas that emerged from the initiative were meant to be incorporated into the regular operations of the university, a task that was delegated to each of KTH’s ten schools. However, even though KTH officially labelled the project a success, the schools have taken a non-uniform approach to this endeavour, as they indeed had done to the project as a whole during its duration. Following up on our earlier reports, and primarily using data from interviews and our own observations, the paper looks at which of the initiative’s ideas and practices have survived the end of the project, in what forms, by what means, and what insights and lessons one can draw from this when designing mechanisms for continuous and sustainable improvement of pedagogical practices at a technical university.

  • 9.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hurdelbrink, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Blended, not stirred: the art of getting high quality blended learning for half the price, or less?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While advocates of blended learning unfailingly promise better learning, they also readily acknowledge that the online material needed is expensive and time-consuming to produce. One rather intuitive solution would be to use pre-existing online material to reap the benefits of blended learning at a discount. This would also serve to maximise the use-value of material already produced.

    This paper presents the work and outcomes of Blending Swedish, a Nordplus project jointly conducted by KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the University of Iceland, and Aalto University. The project had as focus the newest, most modern large open online course in Swedish, Learning Swedish (LS) – a course that in November 2017 had more than 100,000 registered users after barely two years online.

    The project intended to find ways to flexibly and efficiently integrate LS – a self-paced course, with no teacher support, and no feedback on oral or written production – into mixed learning environments, based on research and proven experience. The aim was to support the teaching of beginners’ Swedish inside and outside the Nordic region, help teachers interested in e-learning, and increase the efficiency of the already developed online course by suggesting improvements.

    The most tangible outcome of the project is a teacher’s manual complete with exercises complementing the online course, but the paper will not dwell into the details of this specific course as much as try to identify the general strategies for creating blended learning on the cheap, and discuss the questions that such an approach gives rise to.

  • 10.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Keller, Elizabeth
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Introducing Global Competence in Swedish Engineering Education2018In: FIE 2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This innovative practice work in progress paper describes a recently launched university-wide initiative to strengthen global competence education at Sweden’s largest technical university, KTH Royal Institute of Technology. Current engineering education is expected to equip graduates with the skills needed to work effectively and ethically in environments characterized by social and cultural diversity. While this is commonly agreed on, adjusting program curricula to meet this need has proven to be a challenging task. To address this issue in a pragmatic way, KTH decided in 2016 to introduce an extra-curricular Certificate of Global Competence as a non-intrusive way of complementing existing programs. The certificate is made up of two courses and an international experience. This initiative has been designed to not only help students develop global competence but also to encourage and ensure quality in international mobility. As the certificate courses are elective for all programs at the university, students are presented with an opportunity to work closely together with people from different programs and backgrounds. This fosters cross-disciplinary understanding and encourages international-ization at home. The novelty of the certificate—nothing like it existed at any Swedish university—created uncertainty at the top management level. Even though one of the advantages of the certificate was the fact that it would strengthen the university’s global competence education while leaving existing programs untouched, the validation process took more than two years. However, the final result was that this bottom-up initiative is now endorsed by top management and part of the university’s internationalization endeavors. This paper presents the process of introducing the certificate as well as initial findings from the first courses, plans to extend the global competence initiative to faculty members and make the certificate an integral part of the university’s overall internationalization agenda.

  • 11.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Keller, Elizabeth
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    One step ahead of national strategy: Adding global competence to engineering education2018In: AAEE 2018 Proceedings: The Future Engineer: Accounting for Diversity, https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/18aaee/proceedings/AAEE18_Proceedings_5Dec.pdf, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Ortiz Marcos, Isabel
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Ballesteros-Sánchez, Luis
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Rodríguez-Rivero, Rocío
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    TA VIE: Global Competence Eurostyle2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work-in-progress paper presents a newly launched EU-project, TA VIE: Tools for Enhancing and Assessing the Value of International Experience for Engineers. The project is a three-year collaboration between technical faculty at universities in Spain, France, Italy, Hungary and Sweden, with associate partners representing industry, consultants, educational organizations and student bodies. As a rationale for the project lies a recognition of two facts: the ever-increasing need for global competence among engineering graduates and professionals, and the still overwhelming reliance on structural indicators to gauge internationalization, as opposed to means to objectively and reliably measure qualitative outcomes of internationalization and learning activities for global competence. The project has four specific objectives: 1. To identify the global competence (knowledge, skills and attitudes) needed by engineers. 2. To develop a robust toolkit with which institutions of higher education, companies and organizations can assess individual global competence, and so also measure the effect and effectiveness of training and international mobility. 3. Develop innovative and effective teaching and training strategies for students in higher education, focusing on curriculum design and making better use of the many already existing opportunities for embedded mobility and collaboration. 4. Develop strategies and ways of valorizing the competence of engineers with global competence, to promote employability. The project’s rationale and specific objectives may seem straightforward and in line with international educational trends of the last decades, however, while primarily aimed at introducing the project, the paper also wishes to problematize it. The project is situated within a very specific EU context. Questions are raised about what understanding of the rationale and objectives the project partners, coming from countries with significant political and socioeconomic differences, bring to the project. If global competency for engineers is indeed the ability to “work effectively with people who define problems differently”, the project would seem to have, as its very first challenge, to find ways of making the collaboration and its objectives meaningful both at the local, national and EU levels.

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