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  • 1.
    Andrieux, Sebastien
    et al.
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany.;Inst Charles Sadron UPR22 CNRS, 23 Rue Loess, F-67034 Strasbourg 2, France..
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Herbst, Michael
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Stubenrauch, Cosima
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Monodisperse highly ordered chitosan/cellulose nanocomposite foams2019In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 125, article id UNSP 105516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In solid foams, most physical properties are determined by the pore size and shape distributions and the organisation of the pores. For this reason, it is important to control the structure of porous materials. We recently tackled this issue with the help of microfluidic-aided foam templating, which allowed us to generate mono-disperse and highly ordered chitosan foams. However, the properties of foams also depend on the properties of the pore wall constituents. In case of chitosan-based foams, the foams have poor absolute mechanical properties, simply due to the fact that the solubility of chitosan in water is very low, so that the relative density of the freeze-dried foams becomes very small. Drawing inspiration from the field of nanocomposites, we incorporated cellulose nanofibres into the foamed chitosan solutions, with a view to strengthening the pore walls in the foam and thus the mechanical properties of the final foam. We report here how the cellulose nanofibres affect the structure of both the liquid foam template and the solid foam. The resulting nanocomposite foams have improved mechanical properties, which, however, are not proportional to the amount of cellulose nanofibres in the composites. One reason for this observation is the disturbance of the porous structure of the solid foams by the cellulose nanofibres.

  • 2.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Epoxies can solve moisture problems in nanocellulose materials2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 1220-1227Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Carosio, Federico
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cuttica, Fabio
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Clay nanopaper as multifunctional brick and mortar fire protection coating: Wood case study2016In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 93, p. 357-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Wood is one of the most sustainable, esthetically pleasing and environmentally benign engineering materials, and is often used in structures found in buildings. Unfortunately, the fire hazards related to wood are limiting its application. The use of transparent cellulose nanofiber (CNF)/clay nanocomposites, with unique brick-and-mortar structure, is proposed as a sustainable and efficient fire protection coating for wood. Fire performance was assessed by cone calorimetry. When exposed to the typical 35 kW/m2 heat flux of developing fires, the time to ignition of coated wood samples increased up to about 4 1/2 min, while the maximum average rate of heat emission (MARHE) was decreased by 46% thus significantly reducing the potential fire threat from wood structures.

  • 4.
    Carosio, Federico
    et al.
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Technol, Alessandria, Italy.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Cuttica, Fabio
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Technol, Alessandria, Italy..
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Camino, Giovanni
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Technol, Alessandria, Italy..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanocellulose/clay thin films and foams: Biobased nanocomposites with superior flame retardant properties2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Castro, Daniele Oliveira
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. MoRe Research Örnsköldsvik AB, Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Karim, Zoheb
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. MoRe Research Örnsköldsvik AB, Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Häggström, J. -O
    Carosio, F.
    Svedberg, A.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The use of a pilot-scale continuous paper process for fire retardant cellulose-kaolinite nanocomposites2018In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 162, p. 215-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured materials are difficult to prepare rapidly and at large scale. Melt-processed polymer-clay nanocomposites are an exception, but the clay content is typically below 5 wt%. An approach for manufacturing of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC)/kaolinite nanocomposites is here demonstrated in pilot-scale by continuous production of hybrid nanopaper structures with thickness of around 100 μm. The colloidal nature of MFC suspensions disintegrated from chemical wood fiber pulp offers the possibility to add kaolinite clay platelet particles of nanoscale thickness. For initial lab scale optimization purposes, nanocomposite processing (dewatering, small particle retention etc) and characterization (mechanical properties, density etc) were investigated using a sheet former (Rapid Köthen). This was followed by a continuous fabrication of composite paper structures using a pilot-scale web former. Nanocomposite morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical properties were measured in uniaxial tension. The fire retardancy was evaluated by cone calorimetry. Inorganic hybrid composites with high content of in-plane oriented nanocellulose, nanoclay and wood fibers were successfully produced at pilot scale. Potential applications include fire retardant paperboard for semi structural applications.

  • 6.
    Fu, Qiliang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carosio, Federico
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured Wood Hybrids for Fire-Retardancy Prepared by Clay Impregnation into the Cell Wall2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 36154-36163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-friendly materials need "green" fire-retardancy treatments, which offer opportunity for new wood nanotechnologies. Balsa wood (Ochroma pyramidale) was delignified to form a hierarchically structured and nanoporous scaffold mainly composed of cellulose nanofibrils. This nanocellulosic wood scaffold was impregnated with colloidal montmorillonite clay to form a nanostructured wood hybrid with high flame-retardancy. The nanoporous scaffold was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and gas adsorption. Flame-retardancy was evaluated by cone calorimetry, whereas thermal and thermo-oxidative stabilities were assessed by thermogravimetry. The location of well-distributed clay nanoplatelets inside the cell walls was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. This unique nanostructure dramatically increased the thermal stability because of thermal insulation, oxygen depletion, and catalytic charring effects. A coherent organic/inorganic charred residue was formed during combustion, leading to a strongly reduced heat release rate peak and reduced smoke generation.

  • 7.
    Liu, Andong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    High-Strength Nanocomposite Aerogels of Ternary Composition: Poly(vinyl alcohol), Clay, and Cellulose Nanofibrils2017In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 6453-6461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clay aerogels are foam-like materials with potential to combine high mechanical performance with fire retardancy. However, the compression strength of these aerogels is much lower than theoretically predicted values. High-strength aerogels with more than 95% porosity were prepared from a ternary material system based on PVA, MTM clay platelets and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). A hydrocolloidal suspension of the three components, was subjected to freezedrying so that a low-density aerogel foam was formed. Cell structure was studied by FE-SEM microscopy. Interactions at the molecular scale were observed by XRD and FT-IR. Crosslinking was carried out using glutaraldehyde or borax, and moisture stability was investigated. These biobased ternary aerogels showed much better compression strength than previously studied materials, and show higher strength than high-performance sandwich foam cores such as crosslinked PVC foams.

  • 8.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    High Clay Content Cellulose Nanocomposites for Mechanical Performance and Fire Retardancy2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials based on wood can offer sustainable alternatives to fossil-based plastics and composites, and show interesting mechanical properties. However, the issue of their flammability is generally unresolved. In this thesis, eco-friendly, fire retardant clay-cellulose nanofibril materials are investigated. The work focuses particularly on structure-property relationships and physical properties of these materials. The thesis is structured in two parts. The first part is concerned with paper-like materials, designated as “films”. The second part discusses materials of high-porosity, so-called “foams”.

    In the first part, films of clay and cellulose nanofibrils are prepared by filtration from water. The composition is systematically varied (from 0 to 100% clay) and effects on the nanostructure are investigated by synchrotron X-ray scattering, helium pycnometry and microscopy techniques. The mechanical properties of the films are determined by tensile testing, optical properties are measured by transmittance/haze tests, and strong effects of nanostructure are observed. A film with 50 wt% clay is demonstrated as a fire retardant coating on wood, by cone calorimetry testing. These films are also pre-impregnated with epoxy precursors and cured, to form ternary composites of clay, cellulose nanofibrils, and epoxy. These ternary nanocomposites show remarkably well-preserved mechanical and gas barrier properties in moist environment.

    In the second part, foams of high porosity are prepared by freeze-drying a suspension based on poly(vinyl alcohol), cellulose nanofibrils, and clay. The cellular structure is investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and effects from composition and cross-linking are analyzed. The compressive properties of the foams are determined and related to their structure. Addition of poly(vinyl alcohol) influences the unique degradation and charring behavior of cellulose nanofibrils in the presence of clay so that fire retardancy is decreased.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-22 20:25
  • 9.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Salajkova, Michaela
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites from Clay, Cellulose Nanofibrils, and Epoxy with Improved Moisture Stability for Coatings and Semi-Structural Applications2019In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of high reinforcement content clay-cellulose-thermoset nanocomposite was proposed, where epoxy precursors diffused into a wet porous clay-nanocellulose mat, followed by curing. The processing concept was scaled to > 200 µm thickness composites, the mechanical properties were high for nanocomposites and the materials showed better tensile properties at 90% RH compared with typical nanocellulose materials. The nanostructure and phase distributions were studied using transmission electron microscopy; Young’s modulus, yield strength, ultimate strength and ductility were determined as well as moisture sorption, fire retardancy and oxygen barrier properties. Clay and cellulose contents were varied, as well as the epoxy content. Epoxy had favorable effects on moisture stability, and also improved reinforcement effects at low reinforcement content. More homogeneous nano- and mesoscale epoxy distribution is still required for further property improvements. The materials constitute a new type of three-phase nanocomposites, of interest as coatings, films and as laminated composites for semi-structural applications.

  • 10.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Brick-and-mortar biocomposites from cellulose nanofibrils and clay nanoplatelets2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Alessandria, Italy..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Mechanically strong and fire-retardant nanocomposite aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers and montmorillonite clay2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable Nanocomposite Foams of Poly(vinyl alcohol), Clay and Cellulose Nanofibrils - Mechanical Properties and Flame RetardancyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Appl & Tecnol, Viale Teresa Michel 5, Alessandria, Italy..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable nanocomposite foams of Poly(vinyl alcohol), clay and cellulose nanofibrils - Mechanical properties and flame retardancy2019In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 182, article id 107762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foam-like clay-nanocellulose hybrids are of great interest as load-bearing structural foams with excellent fire retardancy, due to unique effects from clay on thermal cellulose degradation. For the first time, the fire retardancy of clay-nanocellulose foams are studied in detail, in particular the effect of a third polymer phase, poly(vinyl alcohol). The composition with optimum mechanical properties and fire retardancy is identified and analyzed. Foams are prepared by freeze-drying and the compositions are varied systematically. Thermogravimetric analysis is performed on foam degradation. Mechanical properties from compression tests and fire retardancy data from cone calorimetry are reported, together with cellular structures from SEM and relative density estimates for the foams. Self-extinguishing foams are obtained with superior flame retardancy to commercial polymer foams. Addition of poly(vinyl alcohol) is beneficial for mechanical properties of clay-nanocellulose foams, but impedes the fire retardancy by reducing clay-cellulose synergies and cellulose charring during degradation.

  • 14.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS,CERMAV, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Daicho, Kazuho
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Saito, Tsuguyuki
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Yan, Min
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Nanostructure and Properties of Nacre-Inspired Clay/Cellulose Nanocomposites—Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Analysis2019In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 3131-3140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-inspired clay nanocomposites have excellent mechanical properties, combined with optical transmittance, gas barrier properties, and fire retardancy, but the mechanical properties are still below predictions from composite micromechanics. The properties of montmorillonite clay/nanocellulose nanocomposite hybrids are investigated as a function of clay content and show a maximum Young’s modulus as high as 28 GPa. Ultimate strength, however, decreases from 280 to 125 MPa between 0 and 80 wt % clay. Small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering data from synchrotron radiation are analyzed to suggest nanostructural and phase interaction factors responsible for these observations. Parameters discussed include effective platelet modulus, platelet out-of-plane orientation distribution, nanoporosity, and platelet agglomeration state.

  • 15.
    Oliveira de Castro, Danielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Karim, Zoheb
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Svedberg, A.
    Wågberg, Lars
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Scale up of nanocellulose/hybrid inorganic films using a pilot web former2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 408-418Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Prakobna, Kasinee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mechanical performance and architecture of biocomposite honeycombs and foams from core–shell holocellulose nanofibers2016In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 88, p. 116-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CNFs (cellulose nanofibers) based on holocellulose have a pure cellulose fibril core, with a hemicellulose coating. The diameter is only around 6–8 nm and the hemicellulose surface coating has anionic charge. These CNFs are used to prepare honeycomb and foam structures by freeze-drying from dilute hydrocolloidal suspensions. The materials are compared with materials based on “conventional” cellulose CNFs from sulfite pulp with respect to mechanical properties in compression. Characterization methods include FE-SEM of cellular structure, and the analysis includes comparisons with similar materials from other types of CNFs and data in the literature. The honeycomb structures show superior out-of-plane properties compared with the more isotropic foam structures, as expected. Honeycombs based on holocellulose CNFs showed better properties than sulfite pulp CNF honeycombs, since the cellular structure contained less defects. This is related to better stability of holocellulose CNFs in colloidal suspension.

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