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  • 1.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH. BIBA, Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik an der Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Carretero, Ramos Miguel
    KTH.
    Kodjabachian, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Duqueroie, B.
    Protoworld: a simulation based gaming environment to model and plan urban mobility2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 393-400Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will offer the participants the opportunity to explore and test a gaming environment integrating simulation data from different sources. The participants will model and play different mobility options for five European cities. The ProtoWorld solution integrates different simulations and street maps in Unity and allows a playful experience in urban mobility planning. The software will be available for the participants also after the workshop for further experimentation.

  • 2.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Integrating Computational and Participatory Simulations for Design in Complex Systems2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding and conceptualization of cities and its constituent systems such as transportation and healthcare as open and complex is shifting the debates around the technical and communicative rationales of planning. Viewing cities in a holistic manner presents methodological challenges, where our understanding of complexity is applied in a tangible fashion to planning processes. Bridging the two rationales in the tools and methodologies of planning is necessary for the emergence of a 'non-linear rationality' of planning, one that accounts for and is premised upon complexity. Simulations representing complex systems provide evidence and support for planning, and have the potential to serve as an interface between the more abstract and political decision making and the material city systems.

    Moving beyond current planning methods, this thesis explores the role of simulations in planning. Recognizing the need for holistic representations, the thesis integrates multiple disparate simulations into a holistic whole achieving complex representations of systems. These representations are then applied and studied in an interactive environment to address planning problems in different contexts. The thesis contributes an approach towards the development of complex representations of systems; improvements on participatory methods to integrate computational simulations; a nuanced understanding of the relative value of simulation constructs; technologies and frameworks that facilitate the easy development of integrated simulations that can support participatory planning processes.

    The thesis develops contributions through experiments which involved problems and stakeholders from real world systems. The approach towards development of integrated simulations is realized in an open source framework. The framework creates computationally efficient, scalable and interactive simulations of complex systems, which used in a participatory manner delivers tangible plans and designs.

  • 3.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Azhari, Mohammed
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Carretero, Miguel Ramos
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Architectures for distributed, interactive and integrated traffic simulations2015In: Models and Technologies for Intelligent Transportation Systems (MT-ITS), 2015 International Conference on, IEEE , 2015, p. 387-394Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of Intelligent Transport Systems has created new objectives and requirements for traffic simulation models. The development of visualization, procedural modeling, decision support requirements mean that simulation models need to satisfy different requirements. The chapter presents methods and tools to create distribute, integrated and interactive transport simulations, to enable the holistic exploration of complex transport systems, to test different strategies for monitoring and control and for training personnel. The integrated simulation is built leveraging gaming technologies, integrating commercial or off-the-shelf simulations using methods from distributed simulation and procedural modeling techniques.

  • 4.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Evaluating City Operations Design using Interactive SimulationsIn: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Games and simulations are evaluated for serving different functions, such as learning, design, communication and collaboration. Research on the relationship between the constructs of games and their outcomes can provide insights on the design of future games, to steer towards particular outcomes.

     

    Aim. The article aims to relate the constructs of two high fidelity, high tech and free form games to a conceptual evaluation framework, to better understand the relationships between constructs such as fidelity, validity and the functions a game is meant to serve.

     

    Method. The games are built for designing operational procedures for city management. The games are built using the ProtoWorld framework, and simulate the cities of Rome and Haifa through the integration of simulations. The framework enables run time interaction and intervention within the simulated city, such that players can manage and design procedures for their cities through a large scale, realistic simulation system. Controllers from both cities play the games for their respective cities, and attempt to design and manage their simulated cities. As experts on the system, their reflections on the use of such tools in their planning practice and the outcomes of the game sessions are analyzed to evaluate the games and game sessions.

     

    Results. Results point to the free form nature of the game enabling the design of tangible outcomes, which can be immediately validated and implemented in practice. The high fidelity nature of the simulation restricts facilitation, but enhances the players’ ability to comprehend complexity. The agency of the players enables their identification with the simulation, but restricts their creativity in the game. 

  • 5.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hanchi, Hamza
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hybrid, composable approach to simulations in healthcare operations and management2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] W. K. V. Chan, A. D'Ambrogio, G. Zacharewicz, N. Mustafee, G. Wainer, and E. Page, ACM Digital Library, 2017, Vol. F134102, p. 2857-2868Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation has been used for modeling in healthcare for many decades. Ranging from the modeling of physiological processes to group dynamics to the modeling of strategic and system-wide models of healthcare provision, simulation promises to be an effective approach to analyze healthcare operations. Effective application of simulations in healthcare operations requires that simulation deal with wide variability and unpredictability in workflow processes, the complexity of healthcare organizations and enables the participation of human experts in the modeling and operations processes. In this paper, based on requirements drawn from a participatory simulation with healthcare practitioners, we define a hybrid, composable approach to healthcare simulations. Both the participatory simulation and the composable simulation are applied in the context of the New Karolinska Solna hospital in Sweden, a highly specialized new hospital. Results point to the need to accounting for variability in workflow processes and integration with existing IT infrastructure in hospitals. 

  • 6.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Complexity and Context: Meta-requirements for Simulation GamesIn: Simulation and Gaming, ISSN 10468781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Simulations and models mediate between actors, and between actors and reality. Researching their context of use in policy making and their interpretation by policy makers is essential, since it might lead to different requirements and considerations for a modeler and the modeling process. 

     

    Aim. In this article, we investigate and attempt to define the demands and requirements policy makers might have from simulation models, especially in the context of decision making in complex systems. Another goal of this article is to contribute to the ongoing discussion on fidelity and validity, and their relationship with representation of systems in models.

     

    Method. Policy makers have expert knowledge of the systems they work with, as well as considerable experience in working with analytical tools such as simulations that provide them with evidence to support their policy processes. As potential clients and users of simulations, the reflections of 18 policy makers on the use of simulations are triggered through structured, play based exploration of a systems dynamics model. The system dynamics model simulates is specific to the local context and simulates the region they work in. It is implemented within Democracy 3, a commercially available game. This model is explored through game play in a workshop. Through forms and debriefing, insights were gathered from the players’ reflections on the use of models and simulations in policy practice.

     

    Results. Our results point to different requirements from policy makers on simulations and models. Policy makers prefer complete, open models which are flexible and facilitate exploration. Results also demonstrate the linked nature of fidelity and validity. 

  • 7.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Distributed, integrated and interactive traffic simulations2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] L. Yilmaz, W. K. V. Chan, I. Moon, T. M. K. Roeder, C. Macal, and M. D. Rossetti, IEEE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream discourse in urban planning is in transition, due to shifts from a technical to a communicativeperspective, and increased scrutiny and criticism of models and simulations. The cognizance of complexityin urban systems is imposing limitations on modeling. The added benefits of today’s data and compu-tational power make simulations harder to validate and understand. Reconciling the movements towardsa communicative and exploratory approach as compared to a technical and predictive approach requiresnew methods for planning process and posits new requirements and functions for simulations. Based ondistributed simulation and gaming simulation, the paper presents a framework to support the exploration ofsimulated and realistic virtual worlds in a participatory fashion, enabling new approaches to urban planning.The development and evaluation of the framework casts simulations in a new perspective and explores thecontext of use of simulations in planning and design.

  • 8.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Rigor in Gaming for Design: Conditions for Transfer Between Game and Reality2018In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The increasing cognizance of complexity in systems has brought into focus important questions about the methods and tools we use to address them. Games for design, where games and computer simulations are used together to create concrete and tangible designs in a pluralistic way, with multiple stakeholders within the game is a new area for simulation gaming. Aim. In this article about gaming for design, embedded in the design science approach towards game science, we raise important philosophical questions about this new area, as well as attempt to address practical questions at the application level. We attempt to bridge the analytical science and design science approaches to games, and analyze them through meta-constructs of games such as fidelity, abstraction and resolution. Results. Results from two applications, through analysis of game play and debriefing of game sessions from two applications, COMPLEX and ProtoWorld are gathered and analyzed to understand the respresentational requirements for simulations and games. Conclusion. Results point to the need for rigor in gaming, particularly when modeling reference systems and rigor in assessing effects, both during game play and while debriefing. Results also point to expanded definitions of meta-constructs of games, as well as to their linked nature.

  • 9.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Magal Shreenath, Vinutha
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Bridging borders: Integrating data analytics, modeling, simulation, and gaming for interdisciplinary assessment of health aspects in city networks2017In: City Networks: Collaboration and Planning for Health and Sustainability, Springer, 2017, p. 137-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health perspective in urban science brings new methodological challenges to planning of city networks. Due to the system of systems nature of healthcare, new methods are needed to facilitate disciplinary integration and management of models and models-of-models. Participation of stakeholders and policy makers demands the uptake of new methods and a new perspective on the use of interfaces and boundary objects. In this chapter, the authors discuss evidence from five projects that use gaming, simulation, modeling, and data analytics in unconventional ways for design of large-scale urban systems to provide a methodological path forward for overcoming traditional engineering approach issues.

  • 10.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Feasibility Study for Gamification in Transport Maintenance: Requirements to implement gamification in heterogeneous organizations2015In: Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications (VS-Games), 2015 7th International Conference on, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification has been successfully applied in many domains, but mostly for simple, isolated and operational tasks. The hope for gamification as a method to radically change and improve behavior, to provide incentives for sustained engagement has proven to be more difficult to get right. Applying gamification in large networked organizations with heterogeneous tasks remains a challenge. Applying gamification in such enterprise environments posits different requirements, and a match between these requirements and the institution needs to be investigated before venturing into the design and implementation of gamification. The current paper contributes a study where the authors investigate the feasibility of implementing gamification in Trafikverket, the Swedish transport administration. Through an investigation of the institutional arrangements around data collection, procurement processes and links to institutional structures, the study finds areas within Trafikverket where gamification could be successfully applied, and suggests gaps and methods to apply gamification in other areas.

1 - 10 of 10
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