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  • 1.
    Zomer, Lara-Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Daamen, Winnie
    TU Delft.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Hoogendoorn, Serge
    TU Delft.
    Managing Crowds: The Possibilities and Limitations of Crowd Information During Urban Mass Events2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thischapter,basedonamixedmethodresearchapproach,offersinsights into possibilities and limitations of using ICT measures for crowd management and distribution during urban mass events (UMEs). Based on literature, practical applications and analyses of research results, we propose crowd management should consider characteristics of both crowds and UMEs to increase information effectiveness. In relation to urban planning, results show that possibilities to influence a crowd’s behavior depend on available (and known) choice sets offered in various locations, while distances towards locations across city centers appear less important. Limitations appear to be related to scarce knowledge on what drives crowd members to adapt or adhere to their activity choice behavior. Such insights are essential for smart cities striving for an optimal use of infrastructural capacity, as both the ambiguous effects of ICT measures, as well as a crowd’s self-organizing capacity should be taken into account for delaying, solving and preventing dis- ruptions of pedestrian flows in city centers. 

  • 2.
    Zomer, Lara-Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    A META-MODEL FOR INCLUDING SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND DATA INTO SMART CITY MANAGEMENT SIMULATIONS2015In: 2015 WINTER SIMULATION CONFERENCE (WSC), IEEE , 2015, p. 1705-1716Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart city management can be regarded to bridge different realms of thinking about cities, i.e. 1) the city as complex-adaptive system, 2) socio-technical operational control center and 3) multi-actor policy-making. Underpinned by different world views and theoretical bodies, integration of the three realms puts forward new demands on simulation approaches and challenges current knowledge and available technology regarding integration of sub-models across different systems. In order to support urban transportation management, a holistic approach is needed that semantically connects the three realms by incorporation of human behavior and knowledge. Combining research on knowledge management and computer science, this paper presents a novel meta-framework as socio-technical hybrid simulation language to generalize integration of simulations, gaming and data for modeling urban transportation.

  • 3. Zomer, Lara-Britt
    et al.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Meta-Model for Including Social Behavior and Data into Simulation in the Smart City Context2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] L. Yilmaz, W. K. V. Chan, I. Moon, T. M. K. Roeder, C. Macal, and M. D. Rossetti, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mart city management can be regarded to bridge different realms of thinking about cities, i.e., 1) the city as complex-adaptive system, 2) socio-technical operational control center and 3) multi-actor policy-making. Underpinned by different world views and theoretical bodies, integration of the three realms puts forward new demands on simulation approaches and challenges current knowledge and available technology regarding integration of sub-models across different systems. In order to support urban transportation management, a holistic approach is needed that semantically connects the three realms by incorporation of human behavior and knowledge. Combining research on knowledge management and computer science, this paper presents a novel meta-framework as socio-technical hybrid simulation language to generalize integration of simulations, gaming and data for modeling urban transportation.

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