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  • 1.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Anund, A.
    Fors, C.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Association of drivers’ sleepiness with heart rate variability: A pilot study with drivers on real roads2017In: EMBEC & NBC 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 65, p. 149-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vehicle crashes lead to huge economic and social consequences, and one non-negligible cause of accident is driver sleepiness. Driver sleepiness analysis based on the monitoring of vehicle acceleration, steering and deviation from the road or physiological and behavioral monitoring of the driver, e.g., monitoring of yawning, head pose, eye blinks and eye closures, electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram and electrocardiogram (ECG), have been used as a part of sleepiness alert systems. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a potential method for monitoring of driver sleepiness. Despite previous positive reports from the use of HRV for sleepiness detection, results are often inconsistent between studies. In this work, we have re-evaluated the feasibility of using HRV for detecting drivers’ sleepiness during real road driving. A database consists of ECG measurements from 10 drivers, driving during morning, afternoon and night sessions on real road were used. Drivers have reported their average sleepiness level by using the Karolinska sleepiness scale once every five minutes. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of HRV indexes to distinguish between alert, first signs of sleepiness and severe sleepiness states. The results suggest that individual subjects show different reactions to sleepiness, which produces an individual change in HRV indicators. The results motivate future work for more personalized approaches in sleepiness detection.

  • 2.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Ji, Guangchao
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Björlin, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Östlund, Anders
    Kiwok AB.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Textile-Electronic Integration in Wearable Measurement Garments for Pervasive Healthcare Monitoring2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Dizon, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Johansson, M
    KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Evaluating Atrial Fibrillation Detection Algorithm based on Heart Rate Variability analysis2015In: Medicinteknikdagarna, Uppsala: Svensk förening för medicinsk teknik och fysik , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Dizon, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Johansson, M
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Evaluation of Atrial Fibrillation Detection by using Heart Rate Variability analysis2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ferreira, Javier
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Högskolan i Borås.
    Pau de la Cruz, Ivan
    Technical University of Madrid.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering. Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    A handheld and textile-enabled bioimpedance system for ubiquitous body composition analysis.: An initial functional validation2016In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, many efforts have been made to promote a healthcare paradigm shift from the traditional reactive hospital-centered healthcare approach towards a proactive, patient-oriented and self-managed approach that could improve service quality and help reduce costs while contributing to sustainability. Managing and caring for patients with chronic diseases accounts over 75% of healthcare costs in developed countries. One of the most resource demanding diseases is chronic kidney disease (CKD), which often leads to a gradual and irreparable loss of renal function, with up to 12% of the population showing signs of different stages of this disease. Peritoneal dialysis and home haemodialysis are life-saving home-based renal replacement treatments that, compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis, provide similar long-term patient survival, less restrictions of life-style, such as a more flexible diet, and better flexibility in terms of treatment options and locations. Bioimpedance has been largely used clinically for decades in nutrition for assessing body fluid distributions. Moreover, bioimpedance methods are used to assess the overhydratation state of CKD patients, allowing clinicians to estimate the amount of fluid that should be removed by ultrafiltration. In this work, the initial validation of a handheld bioimpedance system for the assessment of body fluid status that could be used to assist the patient in home-based CKD treatments is presented. The body fluid monitoring system comprises a custom-made handheld tetrapolar bioimpedance spectrometer and a textile-based electrode garment for total body fluid assessment. The system performance was evaluated against the same measurements acquired using a commercial bioimpedance spectrometer for medical use on several voluntary subjects. The analysis of the measurement results and the comparison of the fluid estimations indicated that both devices are equivalent from a measurement performance perspective, allowing for its use on ubiquitous e-healthcare dialysis solutions.

  • 6.
    Gyllencreutz, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Ostersund Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ostersund, Sweden..
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holzmann, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abtahi, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Validation of a computerised algorithm to quantify fetal heart rate deceleration area: An observational study2018In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 125, p. 54-54Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Gyllencreutz, Erika
    et al.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Computer and Electronic Engineering.
    Nordström, Lennart
    Lindqvist, Pelle
    Holzmann, Malin
    Characteristics of variable decelerations and prediction of fetal acidemia2017In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 216, no 1, p. S507-S507Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gyllencreutz, Erika
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Ostersund Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, S-83183 Region Jamtland Harjedal, Ostersund, Sweden..
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, Pelle G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Lennart
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holzmann, Malin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abtahi, Farhad
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Validation of a computerized algorithm to quantify fetal heart rate deceleration area2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 9, p. 1137-1147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionReliability in visual cardiotocography interpretation is unsatisfying, which has led to the development of computerized cardiotocography. Computerized analysis is well established for antenatal fetal surveillance but has yet not performed sufficiently during labor. We aimed to investigate the capacity of a new computerized algorithm compared with visual assessment in identifying intrapartum fetal heart rate baseline and decelerations. Material and methodsIn all, 312 intrapartum cardiotocography tracings with variable decelerations were analyzed by the computerized algorithm and visually examined by two observers, blinded to each other and the computer analysis. The width, depth and area of each deceleration was measured. Four cases (>100 variable decelerations) were subjected to in-depth detailed analysis. The outcome measures were bias in seconds (width), beats per minute (depth), and beats (area) between computer and observers using Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver reliability was determined by calculating intraclass correlation and Spearman rank analysis. ResultsThe analysis (312 cases) showed excellent intraclass correlation (0.89-0.95) and very strong Spearman correlation (0.82-0.91). The detailed analysis of >100 decelerations in four cases revealed low bias between the computer and the two observers; width 1.4 and 1.4 seconds, depth 5.1 and 0.7 beats per minute, and area 0.1 and -1.7 beats. This was comparable to the bias between the two observers: 0.3 seconds (width), 4.4 beats per minute (depth) and 1.7 beats (area). The intraclass correlation was excellent (0.90-.98). ConclusionA novel computerized algorithm for intrapartum cardiotocography analysis is as accurate as gold standard visual assessment, with high correlation and low bias.

  • 9.
    Lu, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Nordström, Lennart
    Lindqvist, Pelle
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Software tool for fetal heart rate signal analysis2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lu, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics. Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holzmann, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abtahi, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clintec, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clintec, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fetal heart rate short term variation (STV) during labour in relation to early stages of hypoxia: An observational study2018In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 125, p. 55-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lu, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Holzmann, Malin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Patient Area Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abtahi, Fahrad
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindqvist, Pelle G.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Patient Area Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Lennart
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Patient Area Pregnancy & Delivery Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fetal heart rate short term variation during labor in relation to scalp blood lactate concentration2018In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1274-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionFetal heart rate short term variation (STV) decreases with severe chronic hypoxia in the antenatal period. However, only limited research has been done on STV during labor. We have tested a novel algorithm for a valid baseline estimation and calculated STV. To explore the value of STV during labor, we compared STV with fetal scalp blood (FBS) lactate concentration, an early marker in the hypoxic process. Material and methodsSoftware was developed which estimates baseline frequency using a novel algorithm and thereby calculates STV according to Dawes and Redman in up to four 30-minute blocks prior to each FBS. Cardiotocography traces from 1070 women in labor who had had FBS performed on 2134 occasions were analyzed. ResultsIn acidemic cases (lactate >4.8mmol/L; Lactate Pro), median STV 30minutes prior to FBS was 7.10milliseconds compared with 6.09milliseconds in the preacidemic (4.2-4.8mmol/L) and 5.23milliseconds in the normal (<4.2mmol/L) groups (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between lactate and STV (rho=0.16-0.24; P<.05). Median lactate concentration in cases with STV <3.0milliseconds (n=160) was 2.3mmol/L. When 2 FBS were performed within 60minutes the change rate of lactate correlated to STV (rho=0.33; P<.001). Cases with increasing lactate concentration had a median STV of 5.29milliseconds vs 4.41milliseconds in those with decreasing lactate (P<.001). ConclusionsIn the early stages of intrapartum hypoxia, STV increases, contrary to findings regarding chronic hypoxia in the antenatal period. The increase in the adrenergic surge is a likely explanation.

  • 12.
    Lu, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Abtahi, F.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Rödby, K.
    Seoane, F.
    Wearable cardiorespiratory monitoring system for unobtrusive free-living energy expenditure tracking2019In: IFMBE Proceedings, Springer, 2019, no 1, p. 433-437Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we want to introduce combined heart rate and respiration monitoring for more accurate energy expenditure tracking on free-living subjects. We have developed a wearable cardiorespiratory monitoring system with unobtrusive heart rate measurement and ventilation estimation function for this purpose. The system is based on a garment with integrated textile electrodes for one-lead electrocardiogram and impedance pneumography measurements. A pilot experiment has been performed to prove the concept and to evaluate the characteristics of heart rate and ventilation estimated by our system in relation to energy expenditure. In the experiment, ventilation shows a better linearity in relation to the energy expenditure at the low intensity region than heart rate. Based on these characteristics, a model combining heart rate and ventilation for energy expenditure estimation is proposed which shows a significantly lower estimation error than the heart rate only model.

  • 13. Wollmann, Thomas
    et al.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical sensors, signals and systems.
    Eghdam, Abouzar
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering.
    Haag, Martin
    Koch, Sabine
    User-Centred Design and Usability Evaluation of a Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Game2016In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 4, p. 5531-5539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective: Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is an indicatorof a malfunctioning autonomic nervous system. Resonant frequencybreathing is a potential non-invasive means of intervention for improvingthe balance of the autonomic nervous system and increasing HRV. However,such breathing exercises are regarded as boring and monotonous tasks.The use of gaming elements (gamification) or a full gaming experience is awell-recognised method for achieving higher motivation and engagement invarious tasks. However, there is limited documented knowledge on how todesign a game for breathing exercises. In particular, the influence of additionalinteractive elements on the main course of training has not yet beenexplored. In this study, we evaluated the satisfaction levels achieved usingdifferent game elements and how disruptive they were to the main task, i.e.,paced breathing training.

    Methods: An Android flight game was developed with three game modes thatdiffer in the degrees of multitasking they require. Design, development and evaluation were conducted using a user-centred approach, including contextanalysis, the design of game principle mock-ups, the selection of game principlesthrough a survey, the design of the game mechanics and GUI mock-up,icon testing and the performance of a summative study through user questionnairesand interviews. A summative evaluation of the developed gamewas performed with 11 healthy participants (ages 40-67) in a controlled setting.Results: The results confirm the potential of video games for motivatingplayers to engage in HRV biofeedback training. The highest training performanceon the first try was achieved through pure visualisation rather thanin a multitasking mode. Players had higher motivation to play the morechallenging game and were more interested in long-term engagement.Conclusion: A framework for gamified HRV biofeedback research is presented.It has been shown that multitasking has considerable influence onHRV biofeedback and should be used with an adaptive challenge level.

  • 14.
    Yang, Liyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Lu, Ke
    Abtahi, Farhad
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Seoane, Fernando
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    A pilot study of using smart clothes for physicalworkload assessment2017In: JOY AT WORK, Lund, Sweden, 2017, p. 169-170Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Yang, Liyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. IMM, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. IMM, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Ekblom, Örjan
    GIH, The Swedish School of Sport and Health.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Evaluation of physiological workload assessment methods using heart rate and accelerometry for a smart wearable system2019In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work metabolism (WM) can be accurately estimated by oxygen consumption (VO2), which is commonly assessed by heart rate (HR) in field studies. However, the VO2–HR relationship is influenced by individual capacity and activity characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three models for estimating WM compared with indirect calorimetry, during simulated work activities. The techniques were: the HR-Flex model; HR branched model, combining HR with hip-worn accelerometers (ACC); and HR + arm-leg ACC model, combining HR with wrist- and thigh-worn ACC. Twelve participants performed five simulated work activities and three submaximal tests. The HR + arm-leg ACC model had the overall best performance with limits of agreement (LoA) of −3.94 and 2.00 mL/min/kg, while the HR-Flex model had −5.01 and 5.36 mL/min/kg and the branched model, −6.71 and 1.52 mL/min/kg. In conclusion, the HR + arm-leg ACC model should, when feasible, be preferred in wearable systems for WM estimation.

1 - 15 of 15
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