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  • 1.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Toward Anti-icing and De-icing Surfaces: Effects of Surface Topography and Temperature2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Icing severely affects society, especially in the Nordic countries. Iceaccumulation can result in critical performance problems and safetyconcerns for instance in road, air and sea transportation, transmissionlines, marine and offshore structures, wind turbines and heat exchangers.Present active ice-combating approaches possess environmental,efficiency and cost drawbacks. Thus, fabricating icephobic surfaces orcoatings impeding ice formation (anti-icing), but facilitating ice removal(de-icing) is desired. However, different conditions in the environmentduring ice formation and growth add to the complexity of the problem.An icephobic surface that works for a certain application might not be agood candidate for another. These surfaces and the challenges are infocus in this thesis.Wetting properties are important for ice formation on surfaces fromthe liquid phase (often supercooled water), where the water repellency ofthe surfaces could enhance their anti-icing effect. Considering this,different hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces with differentchemistry, morphology and roughness scale were prepared. Since anyinduced wetting state hysteresis on hydrophobic surfaces could influencetheir performance, the wetting stability was investigated. In particulardynamic wetting studies of the hydrophobic surfaces revealed whatsurface characteristics benefit a stable wetting performance. Further, theeffect of temperature, particularly sub-zero temperatures, on the wettingstate of flat and nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces was investigated.This was complemented with studies of the wetting stability of sessilewater droplets on flat to micro- and multi-scale (micro-nano) roughhydrophobic samples in a freeze-thaw cycle. To be consistent with mostapplications, all temperature-controlled experiments were performed inan environmental condition facilitating frost formation. Further, antiicingproperties of hydrophobic surfaces with different topography butsimilar chemistry were studied by freezing delay measurements.A dynamic wetting study using hydrophobic samples with similarchemistry but different topography revealed that multi-scale roughnesscould benefit the wetting stability. However, when these surfaces areutilized at low temperatures the wetting hysteresis observed during acooling/heating cycle is significant. Such a temperature-inducedhysteresis is also significant on superhydrophobic surfaces. I attributethis to condensation followed by frost formation facilitating spreading of 

    the supercooled water droplet. The freezing delay measurementsdemonstrate no significant effect of surface topography on anti-icingproperties of hydrophobic surfaces, however the flat surfaces showed thelongest delay. These findings are in agreement with heterogeneous icenucleation theory, suggesting preferential ice nucleation in concave sites,provided they are wetted.In the second part of this thesis, I consider the findings from theprevious part illustrating the limitations of (super)hydrophobic surfaces.The de-icing properties of hydrophilic surfaces with a hydration waterlayer, hypothesized to lubricate the interface with ice, were studied. Heretemperature-controlled shear ice adhesion measurements, down to -25oC, were performed on an adsorbed layer of a polymer, either bottle-brushstructured poly(ethylene oxide) or linear poly(ethylene oxide). The iceadhesion strength was reduced significantly on the bottle-brushstructured polymer layer, specifically at temperatures above -15 oC,whereas less adhesion reduction was observed on the layer formed by thelinear polymer. These findings are consistent with differential scanningcalorimetry (DSC) data, demonstrating that the hydration water, boundto the bottle-brush structured polymer, is in the liquid state at thetemperatures where de-icing benefit is observed. Further, continuingwith the hypothesis of the advantage of surfaces with a natural lubricantlayer for de-icing targets, I studied shear ice adhesion on the molecularlyflat basal plane of hydrophilic mica down to -35 oC. Interestingly, ultralowice adhesion strength was measured on this surface. I relate this to theproposed distinct structure of the first ice-like but fluid water layer onmica, with no free OH groups, followed by more bulk liquid-like layers.This combined with the molecularly smooth nature of mica results in aperfect plane for ice sliding.

  • 2.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tyrode, Eric
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Stenroos, Christian
    Koivuluoto, Heli
    Tuominen, Mikko
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ultralow ice adhesion on hydrophilic and molecularly smooth mica surfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite much research on designing surfaces for combating icing, no permanent solution has been achievedusing solid materials. Inspired by the slippery surface of ice, attributed to the presence of a quasi-liquid layeracting as a natural lubricant, we hypothesize that flat hydrophilic surfaces with a hydration layer remaining inthe liquid-like state at the solid-ice interface could result in low ice adhesion. Utilizing temperature-controlledice adhesion measurements on the molecularly smooth basal plane of muscovite mica, we observed the lowestreported ice adhesion on solid surfaces down to temperatures of -35 ºC. The ice adhesion is dramatically higheron flat hydrophilic silica surfaces. We discuss these findings in terms of what is known about mica-water andmica-ice interactions.

  • 3.
    Heydari, Golrokh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tyrode, Eric
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Visnevskij, Ceslav
    Makuska, Ricardas
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Temperature-Dependent Deicing Properties of ElectrostaticallyAnchored Branched Brush Layers of Poly(ethylene oxide)2016In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 17, p. 4194-4202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydration water of hydrophilic polymersfreezes at subzero temperatures. The adsorption of suchpolymers will result in a hydrophilic surface layer that stronglybinds water. Provided this interfacial hydration water remainsliquidlike at subzero temperatures, its presence could possiblyreduce ice adhesion, in particular, if the liquidlike layer isthicker than or comparable to the surface roughness. Toexplore this idea, a diblock copolymer, having one branchedbottle-brush block of poly(ethylene oxide) and one linear cationic block, was electrostatically anchored on flat silica surfaces. Theshear ice adhesion strength on such polymer-coated surfaces was investigated down to −25 °C using a homebuilt device. Inaddition, the temperature dependence of the ice adhesion on surfaces coated with only the cationic block, only the branchedbottle-brush block, and with linear poly(ethylene oxide) was investigated. Significant ice adhesion reduction, in particular, attemperatures above −15 °C, was observed on silica surfaces coated with the electrostatically anchored diblock copolymer.Differential scanning calorimetry measurements on bulk polymer solutions demonstrate different thermal transitions of waterinteracting with branched and linear poly(ethylene oxide) (with hydration water melting points of about −18 and −10 °C,respectively). This difference is consistent with the low shear ice adhesion strength measured on surfaces carrying branchedbottle-brush structured poly(ethylene oxide) at −10 °C, whereas no significant adhesion reduction was obtained with linearpoly(ethylene oxide) at this temperature. We propose a lubrication effect of the hydration water bound to the branched bottlebrushstructured poly(ethylene oxide), which, in the bulk, does not freeze until −18 °C.

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