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  • 1.
    Cong, Jiayan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Kinschel, Dominik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. Dyenamo AB, Sweden.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Safdari, Majid
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Gabrielsson, E.
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Svensson, Per H.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. SP Process Development Forskargatan, Sweden.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. Dalian University of Technology (DUT), China.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethane)copper(i/II) as an efficient redox couple for liquid dye-sensitized solar cells2016In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 4, no 38, p. 14550-14554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new redox couple, [Cu(bpye)2]+/2+, has been synthesized, and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Overall efficiencies of 9.0% at 1 sun and 9.9% at 0.5 sun were obtained, which are considerably higher than those obtained for cells containing the reference redox couple, [Co(bpy)3]2+/3+. These results represent a record for copper-based complex redox systems in liquid DSSCs. Fast dye regeneration, sluggish recombination loss processes, faster electron self-exchange reactions and suitable redox potentials are the main reasons for the observed increase in efficiency. In particular, the main disadvantage of cobalt complex-based redox couples, charge-transport problems, appears to be resolved by a change to copper complex redox couples. The results make copper complex-based redox couples very promising for further development of highly efficient DSSCs.

  • 2.
    Fan, Lizhou
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Peili
    DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ, Inst Artificial Photosynth, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.;DUT, Res Ctr Mol Devices, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Biaobiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Timmer, Brian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. DUT, DUT KTH Joint Educ, Inst Artificial Photosynth, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.;DUT, Res Ctr Mol Devices, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    3D Core-Shell NiFeCr Catalyst on a Cu Nanoarray for Water Oxidation: Synergy between Structural and Electronic Modulation2018In: ACS ENERGY LETTERS, ISSN 2380-8195, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 2865-2874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low cost transition metal-based electrocatalysts for water oxidation and understanding their structure-activity relationship are greatly desired for clean and sustainable chemical fuel production. Herein, a core-shell (CS) NiFeCr metal/metal hydroxide catalyst was fabricated on a 3D Cu nanoarray by a simple electrodeposition-activation method. A synergistic promotion effect between electronic structure modulation and nanostructure regulation was presented on a CS-NiFeCr oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst: the 3D nanoarchitecture facilitates the mass transport process, the in situ formed interface metal/metal hydroxide heterojunction accelerates the electron transfer, and the electronic structure modulation by Cr incorporation improves the reaction kinetics. Benefiting from the synergy between structural and electronic modulation, the catalyst shows excellent activity toward water oxidation under alkaline conditions: overpotential of 200 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) current density and Tafel slope of 28 mV/dec. This work opens up a new window for understanding the structure-activity relationship of OER catalysts and encourages new strategies for development of more advanced OER catalysts.

  • 3.
    Fan, Ting
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Duan, Lele
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Huang, Ping
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ahlquist, Mårten S. G.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    The Ru-tpc Water Oxidation Catalyst and Beyond: Water Nucleophilic Attack Pathway versus Radical Coupling Pathway.2017In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 2956-2966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Ru water oxidation catalysts have been documented in the literature. However, only a few can catalyze the O-O bond formation via the radical coupling pathway, while most go through the water nucleophilic attack pathway. Understanding the electronic effect on the reaction pathway is of importance in design of active water oxidation catalysts. The Ru-bda (bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate) catalyst is one example that catalyzes the 0-0 bond formation via the radical coupling pathway. Herein, we manipulate the equatorial backbone ligand, change the doubly charged bda(2-) ligand to a singly charged tpc- (2,2':6',2 ''-terpyridine-6-carboxylate) ligand, and study the structure activity relationship. Surprisingly, kinetics measurements revealed that the resulting Ru-tpc catalyst catalyzes water oxidation via the water nucleophilic attack pathway, which is different from the Ru-bda catalyst. The O-O bond formation Gibbs free energy of activation (AGO) at T = 298.15 K was 20.2 +/- 1.7 kcal mol(-1). The electronic structures of a series of Ru-v=O species were studied by density function theory calculations, revealing that the spin density of O-Ru=O of Ru-v=O is largely dependent on the surrounding ligands. Seven coordination configuration significantly enhances the radical character of Ru-v=O.

  • 4.
    Sharmoukh, Walid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. Natl Res Ctr, Inorgan Chem Dept, Tahrir St, Giza 12622, Egypt.
    Cong, Jiayan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Gao, Jiajia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Liu, Peng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Quentin, Daniel
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Molecular Engineering of D-D-pi-A-Based Organic Sensitizers for Enhanced Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Performance2018In: ACS OMEGA, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 3819-3829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of molecularly engineered and novel dyes WS1, WS2, WS3, and WS4, based on the D35 donor, 1-(4-hexylphenyl)-2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrole and 4-(4-hexylphenyl)-4H-dithieno[3,2-b: 2', 3'-d] pyrrole as pi-conjugating linkers, were synthesized and compared to the well-known LEG4 dye. The performance of the dyes was investigated in combination with an electrolyte based on Co(II/III) complexes as redox shuttles. The electron recombination between the redox mediators in the electrolyte and the TiO2 interface decreases upon the introduction of 4-hexylybenzene entities on the 2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrole and 4H-dithieno[3,2-b: 2', 3'-d] pyrrole linker units, probably because of steric hindrance. The open circuit photovoltage of WS1-, WS2-, WS3-, and WS4-based devices in combination with the Co(II/III)-based electrolyte are consistently higher than those based on a I-/I-3(-) electrolyte by 105, 147, 167, and 75 mV, respectively. The WS3-based devices show the highest power conversion efficiency of 7.4% at AM 1.5 G 100 mW/cm(2) illumination mainly attributable to the high open-circuit voltage (V-OC).

  • 5.
    Wang, Lei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Fan, Ke
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Chen, Hong
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Rensmo, Håkan
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Towards efficient and robust anodes for water splitting: Immobilization of Ru catalysts on carbon electrode and hematite by in situ polymerization2017In: Catalysis Today, ISSN 0920-5861, E-ISSN 1873-4308, Vol. 290, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ru-bda based molecular water oxidation catalysts 1 and 2 (H(2)bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) containing a thiophene group are attached to the surfaces of electrodes by the method of electropolymerization. The Ru-bda molecular catalyst functionalized graphite carbon electrode can catalyze water oxidation efficiently under a overpotential of ca 500 mV to obtain current density of 5 mA cm(-2); and the similarly functionalized photoelectrode based on alpha-Fe2O3 (hematite) film can work as an photoanode for light driven water splitting.

  • 6.
    Zhang, Jinbao
    et al.
    Monash Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Daniel, Quentin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Zhang, Tian
    Monash Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Wen, Xiaoming
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Ctr Microphoton, Melbourne, Vic 3122, Australia..
    Xu, Bo
    Uppsala Univ, Phys Chem, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Box 523, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Dalian Univ Technol, State Key Lab Fine Chem, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, Dalian 116012, Peoples R China..
    Bach, Udo
    Monash Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia.;CSIRO Mfg, Clayton, Vic 3168, Australia.;Melbourne Ctr Nanofabricat, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia..
    Cheng, Yi-Bing
    Monash Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Clayton, Vic 3800, Australia.;Wuhan Univ Technol, State Key Lab Silicate Mat Architectures, Wuhan 430070, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Chemical Dopant Engineering in Hole Transport Layers for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells: Insight into the Interfacial Recombination2018In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 10452-10462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical doping of organic semiconductors has been recognized as an effective way to enhance the electrical conductivity. In perovskite solar cells (PSCs), various types of dopants have been developed for organic hole transport materials (HTMs); however, the knowledge of the basic requirements for being efficient dopants as well as the comprehensive roles of the dopants in PSCs has not been clearly revealed. Here, three copper-based complexes with controlled redox activities are applied as dopants in PSCs, and it is found that the oxidative reactivity of dopants presents substantial impacts on conductivity, charge dynamics, and solar cell performance. A significant improvement of open- circuit voltage (V-oc) by more than 100 mV and an increase of power conversion efficiency from 13.2 to 19.3% have been achieved by tuning the doping level of the HTM. The observed large variation of V-oc for three dopants reveals their different recombination kinetics at the perovskite/HTM interfaces and suggests a model of an interfacial recombination mechanism. We also suggest that the dopants in HTMs can also affect the charge recombination kinetics as well as the solar cell performance. Based on these findings, a strategy is proposed to physically passivate the electron- hole recombination by inserting an ultrathin Al2O3 insulating layer between the perovskite and the HTM. This strategy contributes a significant enhancement of the power conversion efficiency and environmental stability, indicating that dopant engineering is one crucial way to further improve the performance of PSCs.

1 - 6 of 6
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