Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, A.
    New challenges to study heterogeneity in cancer redox metabolism2017In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, ISSN 2296-634X, Vol. 5, no JUL, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important pathophysiological molecules involved in vital cellular processes. They are extremely harmful at high concentrations because they promote the generation of radicals and the oxidation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, which can result in apoptosis. An imbalance of ROS and a disturbance of redox homeostasis are now recognized as a hallmark of complex diseases. Considering that ROS levels are significantly increased in cancer cells due to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS metabolism has been targeted for the development of efficient treatment strategies, and antioxidants are used as potential chemotherapeutic drugs. However, initial ROS-focused clinical trials in which antioxidants were supplemented to patients provided inconsistent results, i.e., improved treatment or increased malignancy. These different outcomes may result from the highly heterogeneous redox responses of tumors in different patients. Hence, population-based treatment strategies are unsuitable and patient-tailored therapeutic approaches are required for the effective treatment of patients. Moreover, due to the crosstalk between ROS, reducing equivalents [e.g., NAD(P)H] and central metabolism, which is heterogeneous in cancer, finding the best therapeutic target requires the consideration of system-wide approaches that are capable of capturing the complex alterations observed in all of the associated pathways. Systems biology and engineering approaches may be employed to overcome these challenges, together with tools developed in personalized medicine. However, ROS- and redox-based therapies have yet to be addressed by these methodologies in the context of disease treatment. Here, we review the role of ROS and their coupled redox partners in tumorigenesis. Specifically, we highlight some of the challenges in understanding the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one of the most important ROS in pathophysiology in the progression of cancer. We also discuss its interplay with antioxidant defenses, such as the coupled peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin and glutathione/glutathione peroxidase systems, and its reducing equivalent metabolism. Finally, we highlight the need for system-level and patient-tailored approaches to clarify the roles of these systems and identify therapeutic targets through the use of the tools developed in personalized medicine. © 2017 Benfeitas, Uhlen, Nielsen and Mardinoglu.

  • 2. Bosley, Jim
    et al.
    Borén, Christofer
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Grotli, Morten
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Improving the economics of NASH/NAFLD treatment through the use of systems biology2017In: Drug Discovery Today, ISSN 1359-6446, E-ISSN 1878-5832, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1532-1538Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We surveyed NASH therapies currently in development, and found a significant variety of targets and approaches. Evaluation and clinical testing of these targets is an expensive and time-consuming process. Systems biology approaches could enable the quantitative evaluation of the likely efficacy and safety of different targets. This motivated our review of recent systems biology studies that focus on the identification of targets and development of effective treatments for NASH. We discuss the potential broader use of genome-scale metabolic models and integrated networks in the validation of drug targets, which could facilitate more productive and efficient drug development decisions for the treatment of NASH.

  • 3. Fletcher, E.
    et al.
    Feizi, A.
    Bisschops, M. M. M.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khoomrung, S.
    Siewers, V.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Evolutionary engineering reveals divergent paths when yeast is adapted to different acidic environments2017In: Metabolic engineering, ISSN 1096-7176, E-ISSN 1096-7184, Vol. 39, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tolerance of yeast to acid stress is important for many industrial processes including organic acid production. Therefore, elucidating the molecular basis of long term adaptation to acidic environments will be beneficial for engineering production strains to thrive under such harsh conditions. Previous studies using gene expression analysis have suggested that both organic and inorganic acids display similar responses during short term exposure to acidic conditions. However, biological mechanisms that will lead to long term adaptation of yeast to acidic conditions remains unknown and whether these mechanisms will be similar for tolerance to both organic and inorganic acids is yet to be explored. We therefore evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae to acquire tolerance to HCl (inorganic acid) and to 0.3 M L-lactic acid (organic acid) at pH 2.8 and then isolated several low pH tolerant strains. Whole genome sequencing and RNA-seq analysis of the evolved strains revealed different sets of genome alterations suggesting a divergence in adaptation to these two acids. An altered sterol composition and impaired iron uptake contributed to HCl tolerance whereas the formation of a multicellular morphology and rapid lactate degradation was crucial for tolerance to high concentrations of lactic acid. Our findings highlight the contribution of both the selection pressure and nature of the acid as a driver for directing the evolutionary path towards tolerance to low pH. The choice of carbon source was also an important factor in the evolutionary process since cells evolved on two different carbon sources (raffinose and glucose) generated a different set of mutations in response to the presence of lactic acid. Therefore, different strategies are required for a rational design of low pH tolerant strains depending on the acid of interest.

  • 4. Hu, Y.
    et al.
    Zhu, Z.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Siewers, V.
    Heterologous transporter expression for improved fatty alcohol secretion in yeast2018In: Metabolic engineering, ISSN 1096-7176, E-ISSN 1096-7184, Vol. 45, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive host for industrial scale production of biofuels including fatty alcohols due to its robustness and tolerance towards harsh fermentation conditions. Many metabolic engineering strategies have been applied to generate high fatty alcohol production strains. However, impaired growth caused by fatty alcohol accumulation and high cost of extraction are factors limiting large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate that the use of heterologous transporters is a promising strategy to increase fatty alcohol production. Among several plant and mammalian transporters tested, human FATP1 was shown to mediate fatty alcohol export in a high fatty alcohol production yeast strain. An approximately five-fold increase of fatty alcohol secretion was achieved. The results indicate that the overall cell fitness benefited from fatty alcohol secretion and that the acyl-CoA synthase activity of FATP1 contributed to increased cell growth as well. This is the first study that enabled an increased cell fitness for fatty alcohol production by heterologous transporter expression in yeast, and this investigation indicates a new potential function of FATP1, which has been known as a free fatty acid importer to date. We furthermore successfully identified the functional domain of FATP1 involved in fatty alcohol export through domain exchange between FATP1 and another transporter, FATP4. This study may facilitate a successful commercialization of fatty alcohol production in yeast and inspire the design of novel cell factories.

  • 5. Huang, M.
    et al.
    Bao, J.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Petranovic, D.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Efficient protein production by yeast requires global tuning of metabolism2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biotech industry relies on cell factories for production of pharmaceutical proteins, of which several are among the top-selling medicines. There is, therefore, considerable interest in improving the efficiency of protein production by cell factories. Protein secretion involves numerous intracellular processes with many underlying mechanisms still remaining unclear. Here, we use RNA-seq to study the genome-wide transcriptional response to protein secretion in mutant yeast strains. We find that many cellular processes have to be attuned to support efficient protein secretion. In particular, altered energy metabolism resulting in reduced respiration and increased fermentation, as well as balancing of amino-acid biosynthesis and reduced thiamine biosynthesis seem to be particularly important. We confirm our findings by inverse engineering and physiological characterization and show that by tuning metabolism cells are able to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins. Our findings provide increased understanding of which cellular regulations and pathways are associated with efficient protein secretion.

  • 6. Kang, M. -K
    et al.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Biobased production of alkanes and alkenes through metabolic engineering of microorganisms2016In: Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology, ISSN 1367-5435, E-ISSN 1476-5535, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advancement in metabolic engineering of microorganisms has enabled bio-based production of a range of chemicals, and such engineered microorganism can be used for sustainable production leading to reduced carbon dioxide emission there. One area that has attained much interest is microbial hydrocarbon biosynthesis, and in particular, alkanes and alkenes are important high-value chemicals as they can be utilized for a broad range of industrial purposes as well as ‘drop-in’ biofuels. Some microorganisms have the ability to biosynthesize alkanes and alkenes naturally, but their production level is extremely low. Therefore, there have been various attempts to recruit other microbial cell factories for production of alkanes and alkenes by applying metabolic engineering strategies. Here we review different pathways and involved enzymes for alkane and alkene production and discuss bottlenecks and possible solutions to accomplish industrial level production of these chemicals by microbial fermentation.

  • 7. Kang, Min-Kyoung
    et al.
    Zhou, Yongjin J.
    Buijs, Nicolaas A.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Functional screening of aldehyde decarbonylases for long-chain alkane production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae2017In: Microbial Cell Factories, ISSN 1475-2859, E-ISSN 1475-2859, Vol. 16, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low catalytic activities of pathway enzymes are often a limitation when using microbial based chemical production. Recent studies indicated that the enzyme activity of aldehyde decarbonylase (AD) is a critical bottleneck for alkane biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We therefore performed functional screening to identify efficient ADs that can improve alkane production by S. cerevisiae. Results: A comparative study of ADs originated from a plant, insects, and cyanobacteria were conducted in S. cerevisiae. As a result, expression of aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs), which are cyanobacterial ADs, from Synechococcus elongatus and Crocosphaera watsonii converted fatty aldehydes to corresponding Cn-1 alkanes and alkenes. The CwADO showed the highest alkane titer (0.13 mg/L/OD600) and the lowest fatty alcohol production (0.55 mg/L/OD600). However, no measurable alkanes and alkenes were detected in other AD expressed yeast strains. Dynamic expression of SeADO and CwADO under GAL promoters increased alkane production to 0.20 mg/L/OD600 and no fatty alcohols, with even number chain lengths from C8 to C14, were detected in the cells. Conclusions: We demonstrated in vivo enzyme activities of ADs by displaying profiles of alkanes and fatty alcohols in S. cerevisiae. Among the AD enzymes evaluated, cyanobacteria ADOs were found to be suitable for alkane biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. This work will be helpful to decide an AD candidate for alkane biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae and it will provide useful information for further investigation of AD enzymes with improved activities.

  • 8.
    Lee, Sunjae
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Liu, Zhengtao
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Deshmukh, Sumit
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shobky, Mohamed AI
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lovric, Alen
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    TCSBN: a database of tissue and cancer specific biological networks2017In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lee, Sunjae
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Liu, Zhengtao
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klevstig, Martina
    Mukhopadhyay, Bani
    Bergentall, Mattias
    Cinar, Resat
    Ståhlman, Marcus
    Sikanic, Natasa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Park, Joshua K.
    Deshmukh, Sumit
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Harzandi, Azadeh M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kuijpers, Tim
    KTH.
    Grotli, Morten
    Elsässer, Simon J.
    Piening, Brian D.
    Snyder, Michael
    Smith, Ulf
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckhed, Fredrik
    Kunos, George
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Network analyses identify liver-specific targets for treating liver diseases2017In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, E-ISSN 1744-4292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bjornson, Elias
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klevstig, Martina
    Soderlund, Sanni
    Stahlman, Marcus
    Adiels, Martin
    Hakkarainen, Antti
    Lundbom, Nina
    Kilicarslan, Murat
    Hallstrom, Bjorn M.
    Lundbom, Jesper
    Verges, Bruno
    Barrett, Peter Hugh R.
    Watts, Gerald F.
    Serlie, Mireille J.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Smith, Ulf
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Boren, Jan
    Personal model-assisted identification of NAD(+) and glutathione metabolism as intervention target in NAFLD2017In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, E-ISSN 1744-4292, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), we recruited 86 subjects with varying degrees of hepatic steatosis (HS). We obtained experimental data on lipoprotein fluxes and used these individual measurements as personalized constraints of a hepatocyte genome-scale metabolic model to investigate metabolic differences in liver, taking into account its interactions with other tissues. Our systems level analysis predicted an altered demand for NAD(+) and glutathione (GSH) in subjects with high HS. Our analysis and metabolomic measurements showed that plasma levels of glycine, serine, and associated metabolites are negatively correlated with HS, suggesting that these GSH metabolism precursors might be limiting. Quantification of the hepatic expression levels of the associated enzymes further pointed to altered de novo GSH synthesis. To assess the effect of GSH and NAD(+) repletion on the development of NAFLD, we added precursors for GSH and NAD(+) biosynthesis to the Western diet and demonstrated that supplementation prevents HS in mice. In a proof-of-concept human study, we found improved liver function and decreased HS after supplementation with serine (a precursor to glycine) and hereby propose a strategy for NAFLD treatment.

  • 11.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Boren, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Smith, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Systems biology in hepatology: approaches and applications2018In: Nature Reviews. Gastroenterology & Hepatology, ISSN 1759-5045, E-ISSN 1759-5053, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 365-377Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed insights into the biological functions of the liver and an understanding of its crosstalk with other human tissues and the gut microbiota can be used to develop novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of liver-associated diseases, including fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Biological network models, including metabolic, transcriptional regulatory, protein-protein interaction, signalling and co-expression networks, can provide a scaffold for studying the biological pathways operating in the liver in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here, we review studies in which biological network models were used to integrate multiomics data to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological responses of complex liver diseases. We also discuss how this mechanistic approach can contribute to the discovery of potential biomarkers and novel drug targets, which might lead to the design of targeted and improved treatment strategies. Finally, we present a roadmap for the successful integration of models of the liver and other human tissues with the gut microbiota to simulate whole-body metabolic functions in health and disease.

  • 12.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Engineering yeast metabolism for production of fuels and chemicals2016In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 33, p. S66-S66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systems Biology of Metabolism: A Driver for Developing Personalized and Precision Medicine2017In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 572-579Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems biology uses mathematical models to analyze large datasets and simulate system behavior. It enables integrative analysis of different types of data and can thereby provide new insight into complex biological systems. Here will be discussed the challenges of using systems medicine for advancing the development of personalized and precision medicine to treat metabolic diseases like insulin resistance, obesity, NAFLD, NASH, and cancer. It will be illustrated how the concept of genome-scale metabolic models can be used for integrative analysis of big data with the objective of identifying novel biomarkers that are foundational for personalized and precision medicine.

  • 14.
    Nielsen, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers, Sweden.
    Archer, John
    Essack, Magbubah
    Bajic, Vladimir B.
    Gojobori, Takashi
    Mijakovic, Ivan
    Building a bio-based industry in the Middle East through harnessing the potential of the Red Sea biodiversity2017In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 101, no 12, p. 4837-4851Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incentive for developing microbial cell factories for production of fuels and chemicals comes from the ability of microbes to deliver these valuable compounds at a reduced cost and with a smaller environmental impact compared to the analogous chemical synthesis. Another crucial advantage of microbes is their great biological diversity, which offers a much larger "catalog" of molecules than the one obtainable by chemical synthesis. Adaptation to different environments is one of the important drives behind microbial diversity. We argue that the Red Sea, which is a rather unique marine niche, represents a remarkable source of biodiversity that can be geared towards economical and sustainable bioproduction processes in the local area and can be competitive in the international bio-based economy. Recent bioprospecting studies, conducted by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, have established important leads on the Red Sea biological potential, with newly isolated strains of Bacilli and Cyanobacteria. We argue that these two groups of local organisms are currently most promising in terms of developing cell factories, due to their ability to operate in saline conditions, thus reducing the cost of desalination and sterilization. The ability of Cyanobacteria to perform photosynthesis can be fully exploited in this particular environment with one of the highest levels of irradiation on the planet. We highlight the importance of new experimental and in silico methodologies needed to overcome the hurdles of developing efficient cell factories from the Red Sea isolates.

  • 15.
    Robinson, Jonathan L.
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Kemivagen 10, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Ctr Prot Res, Kemivagen 10, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Feizi, Amir
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Kemivagen 10, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Novo Nordisk Res Ctr Oxford, Old Campus Rd, Oxford, England..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Kemivagen 10, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Chalmers Univ Technol, Wallenberg Ctr Prot Res, Kemivagen 10, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Tech Univ Denmark, Novo Nordisk Fdn, Ctr Biosustainabil, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.
    A Systematic Investigation of the Malignant Functions and Diagnostic Potential of the Cancer Secretome2019In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 2622-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The collection of proteins secreted from a cell-the secretome-is of particular interest in cancer pathophysiology due to its diagnostic potential and role in tumorigenesis. However, cancer secretome studies are often limited to one tissue or cancer type or focus on biomarker prediction without exploring the associated functions. We therefore conducted a pan-cancer analysis of secretome gene expression changes to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers and to investigate the underlying biological function of these changes. Using transcriptomic data spanning 32 cancer types and 30 healthy tissues, we quantified the relative diagnostic potential of secretome proteins for each cancer. Furthermore, we offer a potential mechanism by which cancer cells relieve secretory pathway stress by decreasing the expression of tissue-specific genes, thereby facilitating the secretion of proteins promoting invasion and proliferation. These results provide a more systematic understanding of the cancer secretome, facilitating its use in diagnostics and its targeting for therapeutic development.

  • 16. Robinson, Jonathan L.
    et al.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Integrative analysis of human omics data using biomolecular networks2016In: Molecular Biosystems, ISSN 1742-206X, E-ISSN 1742-2051, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 2953-2964Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput '-omics' technologies have given rise to an increasing abundance of genome-scale data detailing human biology at the molecular level. Although these datasets have already made substantial contributions to a more comprehensive understanding of human physiology and diseases, their interpretation becomes increasingly cryptic and nontrivial as they continue to expand in size and complexity. Systems biology networks offer a scaffold upon which omics data can be integrated, facilitating the extraction of new and physiologically relevant information from the data. Two of the most prevalent networks that have been used for such integrative analyses of omics data are genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, both of which have demonstrated success among many different omics and sample types. This integrative approach seeks to unite 'top-down' omics data with 'bottom-up' biological networks in a synergistic fashion that draws on the strengths of both strategies. As the volume and resolution of high-throughput omics data continue to grow, integrative network-based analyses are expected to play an increasingly important role in their interpretation.

  • 17. Sweetlove, Lee J.
    et al.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fernie, Alisdair R.
    Engineering central metabolism - a grand challenge for plant biologists2017In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 749-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of increasing crop productivity and nutrient-use efficiency is being addressed by a number of ambitious research projects seeking to re-engineer photosynthetic biochemistry. Many of these projects will require the engineering of substantial changes in fluxes of central metabolism. However, as has been amply demonstrated in simpler systems such as microbes, central metabolism is extremely difficult to rationally engineer. This is because of multiple layers of regulation that operate to maintain metabolic steady state and because of the highly connected nature of central metabolism. In this review we discuss new approaches for metabolic engineering that have the potential to address these problems and dramatically improve the success with which we can rationally engineer central metabolism in plants. In particular, we advocate the adoption of an iterative 'design-build-test-learn' cycle using fast-to-transform model plants as test beds. This approach can be realised by coupling new molecular tools to incorporate multiple transgenes in nuclear and plastid genomes with computational modelling to design the engineering strategy and to understand the metabolic phenotype of the engineered organism. We also envisage that mutagenesis could be used to fine-tune the balance between the endogenous metabolic network and the introduced enzymes. Finally, we emphasise the importance of considering the plant as a whole system and not isolated organs: the greatest increase in crop productivity will be achieved if both source and sink metabolism are engineered.

  • 18. Varemo, Leif
    et al.
    Henriksen, Tora Ida
    Scheele, Camilla
    Broholm, Christa
    Pedersen, Maria
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Type 2 diabetes and obesity induce similar transcriptional reprogramming in human myocytes2017In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 9, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Skeletal muscle is one of the primary tissues involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The close association between obesity and T2D makes it difficult to isolate specific effects attributed to the disease alone. Therefore, here we set out to identify and characterize intrinsic properties of myocytes, associated independently with T2D or obesity. Methods: We generated and analyzed RNA-seq data from primary differentiated myotubes from 24 human subjects, using a factorial design (healthy/T2D and non-obese/obese), to determine the influence of each specific factor on genome-wide transcription. This setup enabled us to identify intrinsic properties, originating from muscle precursor cells and retained in the corresponding myocytes. Bioinformatic and statistical methods, including differential expression analysis, gene-set analysis, and metabolic network analysis, were used to characterize the different myocytes. Results: We found that the transcriptional program associated with obesity alone was strikingly similar to that induced specifically by T2D. We identified a candidate epigenetic mechanism, H3K27me3 histone methylation, mediating these transcriptional signatures. T2D and obesity were independently associated with dysregulated myogenesis, down-regulated muscle function, and up-regulation of inflammation and extracellular matrix components. Metabolic network analysis identified that in T2D but not obesity a specific metabolite subnetwork involved in sphingolipid metabolism was transcriptionally regulated. Conclusions: Our findings identify inherent characteristics in myocytes, as a memory of the in vivo phenotype, without the influence from a diabetic or obese extracellular environment, highlighting their importance in the development of T2D.

  • 19. Yu, Tao
    et al.
    Zhou, Yongjin J.
    Wenning, Leonie
    Liu, Quanli
    Krivoruchko, Anastasia
    Siewers, Verena
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    David, Florian
    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of very long chain fatty acid-derived chemicals2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of chemicals and biofuels through microbial fermentation is an economical and sustainable alternative for traditional chemical synthesis. Here we present the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae platform strain for high-level production of very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-derived chemicals. Through rewiring the native fatty acid elongation system and implementing a heterologous Mycobacteria FAS I system, we establish an increased biosynthesis of VLCFAs in S. cerevisiae. VLCFAs can be selectively modified towards the fatty alcohol docosanol (C22H46O) by expressing a specific fatty acid reductase. Expression of this enzyme is shown to impair cell growth due to consumption of VLCFA-CoAs. We therefore implement a dynamic control strategy for separating cell growth from docosanol production. We successfully establish high-level and selective docosanol production of 83.5 mg l(-1) in yeast. This approach will provide a universal strategy towards the production of similar high value chemicals in a more scalable, stable and sustainable manner.

  • 20. Zhow, Yongjin J.
    et al.
    Buijs, Nicolaas A.
    Zhu, Zhiwei
    Gomez, Diego Orol
    Boonsombuti, Akarin
    Siewers, Verena
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Harnessing Yeast Peroxisomes for Biosynthesis of Fatty-Acid-Derived Biofuels and Chemicals with Relieved Side-Pathway Competition2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 47, p. 15368-15377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing efficient synthetic pathways for microbial production of biochemicals is often hampered by competing pathways and/or insufficient precursor supply. Compartmentalization in cellular organelles can isolate synthetic pathways from competing pathways, and provide a compact and suitable environment for biosynthesis. Peroxisomes are cellular organelles where fatty acids are degraded, a process that is inhibited under typical fermentation conditions making them an interesting workhouse for production of fatty-acid-derived molecules. Here, we show that targeting synthetic pathways to peroxisomes can increase the production of fatty-acid-derived fatty alcohols, alkanes and olefins up to 700%. In addition, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of these chemicals in the peroxisomes results in significantly decreased accumulation of byproducts formed by competing enzymes. We further demonstrate that production can be enhanced up to 3-fold by increasing the peroxisome population. The strategies described here could be used for production of other chemicals, especially acyl-CoA-derived molecules.

  • 21. Zhu, Z.
    et al.
    Zhou, Y. J.
    Kang, M. -K
    Krivoruchko, A.
    Buijs, N. A.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Technical University of Denmark.
    Enabling the synthesis of medium chain alkanes and 1-alkenes in yeast2017In: Metabolic engineering, ISSN 1096-7176, E-ISSN 1096-7184, Vol. 44, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial synthesis of medium chain aliphatic hydrocarbons, attractive drop-in molecules to gasoline and jet fuels, is a promising way to reduce our reliance on petroleum-based fuels. In this study, we enabled the synthesis of straight chain hydrocarbons (C7–C13) by yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through engineering fatty acid synthases to control the chain length of fatty acids and introducing heterologous pathways for alkane or 1-alkene synthesis. We carried out enzyme engineering/screening of the fatty aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO), and compartmentalization of the alkane biosynthesis pathway into peroxisomes to improve alkane production. The two-step synthesis of alkanes was found to be inefficient due to the formation of alcohols derived from aldehyde intermediates. Alternatively, the drain of aldehyde intermediates could be circumvented by introducing a one-step decarboxylation of fatty acids to 1-alkenes, which could be synthesized at a level of 3 mg/L, 25-fold higher than that of alkanes produced via aldehydes.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf