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  • 1.
    Almulla, Youssef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Lipponen, A.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    The role of energy-water nexus to motivate transboundary cooperation: An indicative analysis of the Drina river basin2018In: International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management, ISSN 2246-2929, E-ISSN 2246-2929, Vol. 18, p. 3-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-carbon hydropower is a key energy source for achieving Sustainable Development Goal 7-sustainable energy for all. Meanwhile, the effects of hydropower development and its operation are complex-and potentially a source of tension on Transboundary Rivers. This paper explores solutions that consider both energy and water to motivate transboundary cooperation in the operation of hydropower plants (HPPs) in the Drina River Basin (DRB) in South-East Europe. Here the level of cooperation among the riparian countries is low. The Open Source energy Modeling System-OSeMOSYS was used to develop a multi-country model with a simplified hydrological system to represent the cascade of HPPs in the DRB; together with other electricity options, including among others: energy efficiency. Results show that improved cooperation can increase electricity generation in the HPPs downstream without compromising generation upstream. It also demonstrates the role of inexpensive hydropower to enhance electricity trade in the region. Implementing energy efficiency measures would reduce the generation from coal power plants, thereby mitigating CO 2 emissions by as much as 21% in 2030 compared to the 2015 levels. In summary, judicious HPP operation and electricity system development will help the Western Balkans reap significant gains.

  • 2. Anjo, J.
    et al.
    Neves, D.
    Silva, C.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Modeling the long-term impact of demand response in energy planning: The Portuguese electric system case study2018In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 165, p. 456-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the urge to decrease carbon emissions, electricity systems need to evolve to promote the integration of renewable resources and end-use energy efficiency. Demand Response (DR) can be used as a strategy, one among many, to improve the balance between demand and supply of electricity, especially in systems that rely heavily on variable energy renewable resources. Thus, it is important to understand up to what extent a countrywide system would cope with DR implementation. In this work, the impact of demand response in the long-term is assessed, using a model of the Portuguese electricity system in the modeling tool OSeMOSYS. The theoretical potential of DR is computed to understand better the impact on the overall system planning, by analyzing three scenarios – a business as usual scenario, a carbon-free system scenario in 2050, and a scenario without heavy carbon emission restrictions. DR impact in all three scenarios results in a decrease in the overall costs, on the capacity installed and in an increase in the percentage of renewable capacity. Further, an economic analysis showed that DR would take 15 years, on average, to influence the average electricity cost and that the reduction in total costs is mainly due to the avoided capacity investments. 

  • 3. Brouwer, F.
    et al.
    Avgerinopoulos, Georgios
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Fazekas, D.
    Laspidou, C.
    Mercure, J. -F
    Pollitt, H.
    Ramos, Eunice Pereira
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Energy modelling and the Nexus concept2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 19, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nexus concept is the interconnection between the resources energy, water, food, land and climate. Such interconnections enable to address trade-offs and seek for synergies among them. Several policy areas (e.g. bio-based economy, circular economy) increasingly consider the Nexus concept. Ignoring synergies and trade-offs between energy and natural flows, can generate misleading modelling outcomes. Several modelling tools are available to address energy and the Nexus. Based on six such models, this paper aims to support the design and testing of coherent strategies for sustainable development. Model improvements would be achieved by comparing model outcomes and including a common baseline.

  • 4. Dhakouani, A.
    et al.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Znouda, E.
    Bouden, C.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Long-term optimisation model of the Tunisian power system2017In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 141, p. 550-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The electricity mix in Tunisia mainly relied on conventional energy sources for over 50 years. Recently, due to fossil fuel prices oscillations and national reserves shortage, the need arose for restructuring the energy supply system. Targeting the integration of renewable energies could be a plan for satisfying the increasing demand and the supply independence. However, several macroeconomic conditions and policies present barriers for the integration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES), despite their abundance, availability and environmental benefits. This paper presents a long-term model of Tunisia electricity system, based on OSeMOSYS (Open Source energy MOdelling SYStem), aimed at unveiling potential benefits of increasing RES in electricity production. The paper first investigates peculiarities of Tunisia electricity system, arguing the necessity to include them in the electricity system model. Then, it explains the choice of OSeMOSYS and brought modifications, including peculiar system characteristics. Finally, the model is applied to two scenarios, a Business As Usual case and a 30% RES target in electricity production case, for time horizon 2010–2030. Results demonstrate the importance of system features detailed modelling. Specifically, they show that targeting RES state-invested integration in the electricity mix may allow higher energy independence to be reached, without increasing significantly system costs.

  • 5.
    Dreier, Dennis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    OSeMOSYS-PuLP: A Stochastic Modeling Framework for Long-Term Energy Systems Modeling2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 1382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent open-data movements give access to large datasets derived from real-world observations. This data can be utilized to enhance energy systems modeling in terms of heterogeneity, confidence, and transparency. Furthermore, it allows to shift away from the common practice of considering average values towards probability distributions. In turn, heterogeneity and randomness of the real-world can be captured that are usually found in large samples of real-world data. This paper presents a methodological framework for an empirical deterministic-stochastic modeling approach to utilize large real-world datasets in long-term energy systems modeling. A new software systemOSeMOSYS-PuLPwas developed and is available now.It adds the feature of Monte Carlo simulations to the existing open-source energy modeling system (the OSeMOSYS modeling framework). An application example is given, in which the initial application example of OSeMOSYS is used and modified to include real-world operation data from a public bus transport system.

  • 6.
    Engström, R. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Destouni, G.
    Bhatt, V.
    Bazilian, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City2017In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 31, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban water and energy systems are crucial for sustainably meeting basic service demands in cities. This paper proposes and applies a technology-independent “reference resource-to-service system” framework for concurrent evaluation of urban water and energy system interventions and their ‘nexus’ or ‘interlinkages’. In a concrete application, data that approximate New York City conditions are used to evaluate a limited set of interventions in the residential sector, spanning from low-flow toilet shifts to extensive green roof installations. Results indicate that interventions motivated primarily by water management goals can considerably reduce energy use and contribute to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Similarly, energy efficiency interventions can considerably reduce water use in addition to lowering emissions. However, interventions yielding the greatest reductions in energy use and emissions are not necessarily the most water conserving ones, and vice versa. Useful further research, expanding the present analysis should consider a broader set of resource interactions, towards a full climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) nexus approach. Overall, assessing the impacts, trade-offs and co-benefits from interventions in one urban resource system on others also holds promise as support for increased resource efficiency through integrated decision making.

  • 7.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramaswamy, Vivek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. IIASA, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria..
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Cross-Scale Water and Land Impacts of Local Climate and Energy PolicyA Local Swedish Analysis of Selected SDG Interactions2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how local energy and climate actions can affect the use of water and land resources locally, nationally and globally. Each of these resource systems is linked to different Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); we also explore related SDG interactions. A municipality in Sweden with the ambition of phasing out fossil fuels by year 2030 is used as illustrative case example. The local energy system is modelled in detail and indirect water and land requirements are quantified for three stylised decarbonisation scenarios of pathways to meeting climate and energy requirements (related to SDG13 and SDG7, respectively). Total local, national and global implications are addressed for the use of water and land resources, which relate to SDG6 for water, and SDG2 and SDG15 for land use. We find that the magnitude and location of water and land impacts are largely pathway-dependent. Some scenarios of low carbon energy may impede progress on SDG15, while others may compromise SDG6. Data for the studied resource uses are incoherently reported and have important gaps. As a consequence, the study results are indicative and subject to uncertainty. Still, they highlight the need to recognise that resource use changes targeting one SDG in one locality have local and non-local impacts that may compromise progress other SDGs locally and/or elsewhere in the world.

  • 8.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Destouni, G.
    Water impacts and water-climate goal conflicts of local energy choices - notes from a Swedish perspective2018In: Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences, Copernicus GmbH , 2018, Vol. 376, p. 25-33Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet both the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), nations, sectors, counties and cities need to move towards a sustainable energy system in the next couple of decades. Such energy system transformations will impact water resources to varying extents, depending on the transformation strategy and fuel choices. Sweden is considered to be one of the most advanced countries towards meeting the SDGs. This paper explores the geographical origin of and the current water use associated with the supply of energy in the 21 regional counties of Sweden. These energy-related uses of water represent indirect, but still relevant, impacts for water management and the related SDG on clean water and sanitation (SDG 6). These indirect water impacts are here quantified and compared to reported quantifications of direct local water use, as well as to reported greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as one example of other types of environmental impacts of local energy choices in each county. For each county, an accounting model is set up based on data for the local energy use in year 2010, and the specific geographical origins and water use associated with these locally used energy carriers (fuels, heat and electricity) are further estimated and mapped based on data reported in the literature and open databases. Results show that most of the water use associated with the local Swedish energy use occurs outside of Sweden. Counties with large shares of liquid biofuel exhibit the largest associated indirect water use in regions outside of Sweden. This indirect water use for energy supply does not unambiguously correlate with either the local direct water use or the local GHG emissions, although for the latter, there is a tendency towards an inverse relation. Overall, the results imply that actions for mitigation of climate change by local energy choices may significantly affect water resources elsewhere. Swedish counties are thus important examples of localities with large geographic zones of water influence due to their local energy choices, which may compromise water security and the possibility to meet water-related global goals in other world regions.

  • 9.
    Engström, Rebecka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Department of Physical Geography and the Bolin Centre of Climate Research, Stockholm University.
    Water impacts and water-climate goal conflicts of local energy choices – notes from a Swedish perspective2018In: Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences, ISSN 2199-899X, Vol. 376, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet both the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), nations, sectors, counties and cities need to move towards a sustainable energy system in the next couple of decades. Such energy system transformations will impact water resources to varying extents, depending on the transformation strategy and fuel choices. Sweden is considered to be one of the most advanced countries towards meeting the SDGs. This paper explores the geographical origin of and the current water use associated with the supply of energy in the 21 regional counties of Sweden. These energy-related uses of water represent indirect, but still relevant, impacts for water management and the related SDG on clean water and sanitation (SDG 6). These indirect water impacts are here quantified and compared to reported quantifications of direct local water use, as well as to reported greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as one example of other types of environmental impacts of local energy choices in each county. For each county, an accounting model is set up based on data for the local energy use in year 2010, and the specific geographical origins and water use associated with these locally used energy carriers (fuels, heat and electricity) are further estimated and mapped based on data reported in the literature and open databases. Results show that most of the water use associated with the local Swedish energy use occurs outside of Sweden. Counties with large shares of liquid biofuel exhibit the largest associated indirect water use in regions outside of Sweden. This indirect water use for energy supply does not unambiguously correlate with either the local direct water use or the local GHG emissions, although for the latter, there is a tendency towards an inverse relation. Overall, the results imply that actions for mitigation of climate change by local energy choices may significantly affect water resources elsewhere. Swedish counties are thus important examples of localities with large geographic zones of water influence due to their local energy choices, which may compromise water security and the possibility to meet water-related global goals in other world regions.

  • 10.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Morrison, Robbie
    Schillerstr 85, D-10627 Berlin, Germany..
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Beltramo, Agnese
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Hoersch, Jonas
    Frankfurt Inst Adv Studies, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Niet, Taco
    British Columbia Inst Technol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Almulla, Youssef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Burandt, Thorsten
    Tech Univ Berlin, Workgrp Econ & Infrastruct Policy WIP, Berlin, Germany..
    Pena Balderrama, J. Gabriela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Pinto de Moura, Gustavo Nikolaus
    Univ Fed Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil..
    Zepeda, Eduardo
    United Nations Dept Econ & Social Affairs, Dev Policy & Anal Div, New York, NY USA..
    Alfstad, Thomas
    United Nations Dept Econ & Social Affairs, Dev Policy & Anal Div, New York, NY USA..
    From the development of an open-source energy modelling tool to its application and the creation of communities of practice: The example of OSeMOSYS2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 20, p. 209-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decades, energy modelling has supported energy planning by offering insights into the dynamics between energy access, resource use, and sustainable development. Especially in recent years, there has been an attempt to strengthen the science-policy interface and increase the involvement of society in energy planning processes. This has, both in the EU and worldwide, led to the development of open-source and transparent energy modelling practices. This paper describes the role of an open-source energy modelling tool in the energy planning process and highlights its importance for society. Specifically, it describes the existence and characteristics of the relationship between developing an open-source, freely available tool and its application, dissemination and use for policy making. Using the example of the Open Source energy Modelling System (OSeMOSYS), this work focuses on practices that were established within the community and that made the framework's development and application both relevant and scientifically grounded.

  • 11.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    IAEA, Vienna Int Ctr, Planning & Econ Studies Sect, A-1400 Vienna, Austria..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Colombo, Emanuela
    Politecn Milan, Sustainable Energy Syst Anal & Modelling, Dept Energy, Via Lambruschini 4c, I-20156 Milan, Italy..
    Representation of Balancing Options for Variable Renewables in Long-Term Energy System Models: An Application to OSeMOSYS2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 2366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing complexity and the many challenges related to fast-changing and highly de-carbonised electricity systems require reliable and robust open source energy modelling frameworks. Their reliability may be tested on a series of well-posed benchmarks that can be used and shared by the modelling community. This paper describes and integrates stand-alone, independent modules to compute the costs and benefits of flexible generation options in the open source energy investment modelling framework OSeMOSYS. The modules are applied to a case study that may work as a benchmark. The whole documentation of the modules and the test case study are retrievable, reproducible, reusable, interoperable, and auditable. They create a case to help establish a FAIR-compliant, user-friendly, and low-threshold model and data standards in modelling practices. As is well known, one of the options for balancing high shares of variable renewables is flexible power generation by dispatchable units. The associated costs need to be considered for short-term operational analyses and for long-term investment plans. The added modules contribute to extending the modelling capacity by introducing (a) costs of ramping, (b) non-linear decrease of efficiency at partial load operation, and the cost minimisation objective function of OSeMOSYS. From application to the test case study, two main insights are drawn: costs of ramping and decreased partial load efficiency may influence the competitiveness of generation technologies in the provision of reserve capacity; and refurbishment of existing units may represent attractive investment options for increasing flexibility. Both effects are also seen in the long-term and may impact infrastructure investment decisions to meet decarbonisation targets. These effects would not be captured without the introduction of the modules.

  • 12.
    Korkovelos, Alexandros
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Khavari, Babak
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sahlberg, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Arderne, Christopher
    World Bank Grp, Washington, DC 20433 USA..
    The Role of Open Access Data in Geospatial Electrification Planning and the Achievement of SDG7. An OnSSET-Based Case Study for Malawi2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 1395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving universal access to electricity is a development challenge many countries are currently battling with. The advancement of information technology has, among others, vastly improved the availability of geographic data and information. That, in turn, has had a considerable impact on tracking progress as well as better informing decision making in the field of electrification. This paper provides an overview of open access geospatial data and GIS based electrification models aiming to support SDG7, while discussing their role in answering difficult policy questions. Upon those, an updated version of the Open Source Spatial Electrification Toolkit (OnSSET-2018) is introduced and tested against the case study of Malawi. At a cost of $1.83 billion the baseline scenario indicates that off-grid PV is the least cost electrification option for 67.4% Malawians, while grid extension can connect about 32.6% of population in 2030. Sensitivity analysis however, indicates that the electricity demand projection determines significantly both the least cost technology mix and the investment required, with the latter ranging between $1.65-7.78 billion.

  • 13.
    Korkovelos, Alexandros
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Arderne, C.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Beck, H.
    De Roo, A.
    A geospatial assessment of small-scale hydropower potential in sub-saharan Africa2018In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 3100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub-Saharan Africa has been at the epicenter of an ongoing global dialogue around the issue of energy poverty. More than half of the world's population without access to modern energy services lives there. It also happens to be a sub-continent with plentiful renewable energy resource potential. Hydropower is one of them, and to a large extent it remains untapped. This study focuses on the technical assessment of small-scale hydropower (0.01-10 MW) in Sub-Saharan Africa. The underlying methodology was based on open source geospatial datasets, whose combination allowed a consistent evaluation of 712,615 km of river network spanning over 44 countries. Environmental, topological, and social constraints were included in the form of constraints in the optimization algorithm. The results are presented on a country and power pool basis.

  • 14. Labordena, M.
    et al.
    Patt, A.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Lilliestam, J.
    Impact of political and economical barriers for concentrating solar power in Sub-Saharan Africa2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 102, p. 52-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) needs additional affordable and reliable electricity to fuel its social and economic development. Ideally, all of this new supply is carbon-neutral. The potentials for renewables in SSA suffice for any conceivable demand, but the wind power and photovoltaic resources are intermittent and difficult to integrate in the weak electricity grids. Here, we investigate the potential for supplying SSA demand centers with dispatchable electricity from concentrating solar power (CSP) stations equipped with thermal storage. We show that, given anticipated cost reductions from technological improvements, power from CSP could be competitive with coal power in Southern Africa by 2025; but in most SSA countries, power from CSP may not be competitive. We also show that variations in risk across countries influences the cost of power from CSP more than variations in solar resources. If policies to de-risk CSP investment to financing cost levels found in industrialized countries were successfully implemented, power from CSP could become cheaper than coal power by 2025 in all SSA countries. Policies to increase institutional capacity and cooperation among SSA countries could reduce costs further. With dedicated policy measures, therefore, CSP could become an economically attractive electricity option for all SSA countries.

  • 15.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Korkovelos, Alexandros
    KTH.
    Arderne, Christopher
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Zepeda, Eduardo
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    de Roo, Ad
    Tanvez, Yann
    Oudalov, Alexander
    Scholtz, Ernst
    Lighting the World: the first application of an open source, spatial electrification tool (OnSSET) on Sub-Saharan Africa2017In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 8, article id 085003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Agenda 2030, which comprises a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) defined by 169 targets. 'Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030' is the seventh goal (SDG7). While access to energy refers to more than electricity, the latter is the central focus of this work. According to the World Bank's 2015 Global Tracking Framework, roughly 15% of the world's population (or 1.1 billion people) lack access to electricity, and many more rely on poor quality electricity services. The majority of those without access (87%) reside in rural areas. This paper presents results of a geographic information systems approach coupled with open access data. We present least-cost electrification strategies on a country-by-country basis for Sub-Saharan Africa. The electrification options include grid extension, mini-grid and stand-alone systems for rural, peri-urban, and urban contexts across the economy. At low levels of electricity demand there is a strong penetration of standalone technologies. However, higher electricity demand levels move the favourable electrification option from stand-alone systems to mini grid and to grid extensions.

  • 16.
    Moksnes, Nandi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Korkovelos, Alexandros
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Electrification pathways for Kenya-linking spatial electrification analysis and medium to long term energy planning2017In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 9, article id 095008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2015 UN announced 17 Sustainable Development goals (SDG) from which goal number 7 envisions universal access to modern energy services for all by 2030. In Kenya only about 46% of the population currently has access to electricity. This paper analyses hypothetical scenarios, and selected implications, investigating pathways that would allow the country to reach its electrification targets by 2030. Two modelling tools were used for the purposes of this study, namely OnSSET and OSeMOSYS. The tools were soft-linked in order to capture both the spatial and temporal dynamics of their nature. Two electricity demand scenarios were developed representing low and high end user consumption goals respectively. Indicatively, results show that geothermal, coal, hydro and natural gas would consist the optimal energy mix for the centralized national grid. However, in the case of the low demand scenario a high penetration of stand-alone systems is evident in the country, reaching out to approximately 47% of the electrified population. Increasing end user consumption leads to a shift in the optimal technology mix, with higher penetration of mini-grid technologies and grid extension.

  • 17.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. Colorado Sch Mines, Payne Inst, Golden, CO 80401 USA..
    Sovacool, Benjamin
    Univ Sussex, Sch Business Management & Econ, Sci Policy Res Unit, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Hughes, Nick
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Cozzi, Laura
    Int Energy Agcy, World Energy Outlook Team, Paris, France..
    Cosgrave, Ellie
    UCL, Dept Sci Technol Engn & Publ Policy, London, England..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Tavoni, Massimo
    Politecn Milan, Dept Management Econ & Ind Engn, Milan, Italy.;Ctr Euromediterraneo Cambiamenti Climat, RFF CMCC European Inst Econ & Environm, Milan, Italy..
    Tomei, Julia
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Zerriffi, Hisham
    Colorado Sch Mines, Payne Inst, Golden, CO 80401 USA.;Univ British Columbia, Forest Sci Ctr, Dept Forest Resources Management, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Milligan, Ben
    Univ New South Wales, Fac Law, Kingsford, NSW, Australia..
    Connecting climate action with other Sustainable Development Goals2019In: Nature Sustainability, ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 674-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The international community has committed to combat climate change and achieve 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here we explore (dis)connections in evidence and governance between these commitments. Our structured evidence review suggests that climate change can undermine 16 SDGs, while combatting climate change can reinforce all 17 SDGs but undermine efforts to achieve 12. Understanding these relationships requires wider and deeper interdisciplinary collaboration. Climate change and sustainable development governance should be better connected to maximize the effectiveness of action in both domains. The emergence around the world of new coordinating institutions and sustainable development planning represents promising progress.

  • 18.
    Pena Balderrama, J. Gabriela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Alfstad, Thomas
    United Nations Div Social & Econ Affairs, New York, NY 10001 USA..
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    Cyprus Inst, CY-2121 Nicosia, Cyprus..
    Hesamzadeh, Mohammad Reza
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    A Sketch of Bolivia's Potential Low-Carbon Power System Configurations. The Case of Applying Carbon Taxation and Lowering Financing Costs2018In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers hypothetical options for the transformation of the Bolivian power generation system to one that emits less carbon dioxide. Specifically, it evaluates the influence of the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) on marginal abatement cost curves (MACC) when applying carbon taxation to the power sector. The study is illustrated with a bottom-up least-cost optimization model. Projections of key parameters influence the shape of MACCs and the underlying technology configurations. These are reported. Results from our study (and the set of assumptions on which they are based) are country-specific. Nonetheless, the methodology can be replicated to other case studies to provide insights into the role carbon taxes and lowering finance costs might play in reducing emissions.

  • 19.
    Pena Balderrama, J. Gabriela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. UMSS, Bolivia.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sevillano, R. Carlos
    Alejo, Lucio
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Techno-economic demand projections and scenarios for the Bolivian energy system2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 16, p. 96-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing energy access in emerging economies has played an important role to maintain or achieve desirable social and economic development targets. As a consequence, the growing energy requirements need policy instruments to ensure energy supply for future generations. The literature reports many studies with different approaches to model and test policy measures in the energy sector, however few energy-related studies for Bolivia are available. This paper addresses this knowledge gap, representing the first national level energy demand model and projections for Bolivia. The model use demographic, economic, technology and policy trends with a pragmatic model structure that combines bottom-up and top-down modelling. The scenario analysis has a particular focus on alternatives for energy savings, energy mix diversification and air quality. Three scenarios were analysed: Energy Savings, Fuel Substitution and the aggregate effects in a Combined scenario. The reference scenario results show the overall energy consumption grows 134% in 2035 compared to 2012 with an annual average growth of 3.8%. The final energy demand in the energy savings scenario is 8.5% lower than the Reference scenario, 1.5% lower in the fuel substitution scenario and 9.4% lower in the combined Scenario. The aggregate impact of both energy savings and fuel substitution measures leads to potential avoided emissions of 25.84 million Tons of CO2 equivalent in the model horizon 2012-2035.

  • 20.
    Pinto de Moura, Gustavo Nikolaus
    et al.
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Programa Planejamento Energet, Ctr Tecnol, Ilhado Fundao, Bloco C,Sala 211,Cidade Univ, BR-21949972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil..
    Loureiro Legey, Luiz Fernando
    Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Programa Planejamento Energet, Ctr Tecnol, Ilhado Fundao, Bloco C,Sala 211,Cidade Univ, BR-21949972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    A Brazilian perspective of power systems integration using OSeMOSYS SAMBA - South America Model Base - and the bargaining power of neighbouring countries: A cooperative games approach2018In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 115, p. 470-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to contribute to a better understanding of both advantages and drawbacks of power systems interconnection processes between Brazil and its South American neighbours. Based on data available in national and international reports, three scenarios for the power supply sector expansion were modelled in OSeMOSYS. The Brazilian perspective of power integration considers funding strategic hydro projects in Argentina, Bolivia, Guyana and Peru. An alternative to the power integration process considers higher penetration of distributed photovoltaics and biogas power plants as well as lower hydro capacity expansion in Brazil. Features related to costs, carbon emissions, hydro reservoirs, technological performance, electricity demand, population growth, time zones and reserve margin were considered. The comparison of different scenarios provides insights regarding the contribution of renewable energy generation and sheds light on cross-border trade perspectives between Brazil and other countries in South America. Using a cooperative games approach, the bargaining power of each country (player) was calculated by applying the Shapley value concept. Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Peru and Guyana have the largest bargaining power, either as exporter or importer.

  • 21.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Welsch, M.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Jakšić, D.
    Baričević, T.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Gupta, Sunay
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Rogner, H.
    Valuing blackouts and lost leisure: Estimating electricity interruption costs for households across the European Union2017In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 34, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Security of power supply is a crucial element of energy system planning and policy. However, the value that society places on it is not clearly known. Several previous studies estimate the cost of electricity interruptions for individual European Union (EU) Member States – as the Value of Lost Load (VoLL). In this paper, we use a production-function approach to estimate the average annual VoLL for households in all twenty-eight EU Member States. This is the first time that a unified approach has been applied for a single year across the EU. VoLL is further presented on an hourly basis to better understand the impact of the time at which the interruption occurs. Finally, we analyse the impact of ‘substitutability factor’ – the proportion of household activities that are electricity-dependent – on the VoLL. Results from this study show that the differences in VoLL between EU Member States is significantly large, ranging from 3.2 €/kWh in Bulgaria to 15.8 €/kWh in the Netherlands. The annual average VoLL for the EU was calculated to be 8.7 €/kWh. Results from this study can be used to inform key areas of European energy policy and market design.

  • 22.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Jakši, D.
    Barievi, T.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Need for Reliability and Measuring Its Cost2017In: Europe's Energy Transition - Insights for Policy Making, Elsevier, 2017, p. 207-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, power supply in the EU is characterized by a relatively high reliability. It should, however, not be taken for granted given the increasing shares of variable RES. Choosing the socioeconomically optimal level of reliability to aim for requires a thorough understanding of the socioeconomic costs of electricity supply interruptions. This chapter provides guidance on how to measure the consequences of supply interruptions and thus determine the value of electricity supply security.

  • 23.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Economic analysis of standalone wind-powered hydrogen refueling stations for road transport at selected sites in Sweden (vol 40, pg 9855, 2015)2019In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 44, no 23, p. 12288-12290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The measurement units of yearly wind electricity and hydrogen production in the following sections of the previously published paper as titled above are now changed from (MWh/year and kTon/year) to (GWh/year and tons/year). These changes apply to all the measuring units in text and related tables of the following sections. All the results of this paper are still valid and unchanged. 

  • 24.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mapping key economic indicators of onshore wind energy in Sweden by using a geospatial methodology2016In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 128, p. 211-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to modern advancements in renewable energy systems and increasing prices of fossil fuels wind energy is getting a lot of attention all over the world. In this regard, Sweden also fixed motivated targets to get energy supply from local renewable energy resources. So, local wind power could help the country in achieving the targets. In this study, economic indicators of wind energy were spatially estimated for Sweden by using ArcGIS tool. In order to do this, as input data one-year high resolution modeled annual average wind data was processed by means of Rayleigh distribution, wind turbine power curve, land use constraints, technical constraints and economic parameters. Based on the input data, it was concluded that Sweden possesses economically feasible wind energy resource. The results of the study indicate that southern and central regions could produce economically viable wind electricity in all aspects as compared to the northern region of the country. Lastly, it was recommended to speed up wind energy penetration in Sweden, communal awareness and acceptance regarding the resource should be increased to avoid possible misunderstanding. Additionally, the capability of the national electric grid should be enhanced to take up the large scale unpredictable wind energy resource.

  • 25.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Boehlert, B.
    Groves, D. G.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Taliotis, C.
    Neumann, J. E.
    Strzepek, K. M.
    Lempert, R.
    Joyce, B.
    Huber-Lee, A.
    Cervigni, R.
    Resilience of the Eastern African electricity sector to climate driven changes in hydropower generation2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Notwithstanding current heavy dependence on gas-fired electricity generation in the Eastern African Power Pool (EAPP), hydropower is expected to play an essential role in improving electricity access in the region. Expansion planning of electricity infrastructure is critical to support investment and maintaining balanced consumer electricity prices. Variations in water availability due to a changing climate could leave hydro infrastructure stranded or result in underutilization of available resources. In this study, we develop a framework consisting of long-term models for electricity supply and water systems management, to assess the vulnerability of potential expansion plans to the effects of climate change. We find that the most resilient EAPP rollout strategy corresponds to a plan optimised for a slightly wetter climate compared to historical trends. This study demonstrates that failing to climate-proof infrastructure investments can result in significant electricity price fluctuations in selected countries (Uganda & Tanzania) while others, such as Egypt, are less vulnerable.

  • 26.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Zepeda, E.
    United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), Development Policy and Analysis Division, 405 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, United States.
    Boehlert, B.
    Industrial Economics Inc., 2067 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140, United States.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA), Development Policy and Analysis Division, 405 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, United States.
    Taliotis, C.
    The Cyprus Institute, 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street, Aglantzia, Nicosia, 2121, Cyprus.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    The impact of climate change on crop production in Uganda-An integrated systems assessment with water and energy implications2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 1805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With less than 3% of agricultural cropland under irrigation, subsistence farmers in Uganda are dependent on seasonal precipitation for crop production. The majority of crops grown in the country-especially staple food crops like Matooke (Plantains)-are sensitive to the availability of water throughout their growing period and hence vulnerable to climatic impacts. In response to these challenges, the Government has developed an ambitious irrigation master plan. However, the energy implications of implementing the plan have not been explored in detail. This article attempts to address three main issues involving the nexus between water, energy, crop production, and climate. The first one explores the impact of climate on rain-fed crop production. The second explores the irrigation crop water needs under selected climate scenarios. The third focuses on the energy implications of implementing the irrigation master plan. We attempt to answer the above questions using a water balance model for Uganda developed for this study. Our results, developed at a catchment level, indicate that on average there could be an 11% reduction and 8% increase in rain-fed crop production in the cumulatively driest and wettest climates, respectively. Furthermore, in the identified driest climate, the electricity required for pumping water is expected to increase by 12% on average compared to the base scenario.

  • 27. Taibi, E.
    et al.
    Fernández del Valle, C.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. University of Technology Sidney, 15 Broadway, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.
    Strategies for solar and wind integration by leveraging flexibility from electric vehicles: The Barbados case study2018In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 164, p. 65-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid deployment of large shares of Variable Renewable Energy (VRE) is driving a shift in economics and operational practices in power systems around the world, creating the need for a more flexible and decentralized power system. In this context, electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a significant role, as they can make use of large shares of renewables in the power system to decarbonise the transportation sector. It is important to carefully plan for EV integration to make sure that they facilitate the integration of VRE and capture the potential benefits for the power system. This paper assesses the different impacts on production costs that electric vehicles could have depending on different charging profiles and considering the value added from allowing the EVs to provide energy and ancillary services to the grid. This paper shows how smart charging strategies can 1) limit the total increase in production cost from charging EVs, 2) facilitate VRE integration into the system reducing curtailment 3) affect marginal cost of electricity and 4) reduce the investment needed for grid connected storage, using an innovative approach to calculate the contribution of EVs to system reliability based on the different charging scenario. Finally, the effects of adding a constraint to represent battery degradation due to operation are analysed. This analysis is carried out using as a case study the Caribbean island of Barbados, given the expected large shares of VRE in the future, however it suggests a general framework to assess the impact of EVs in power systems with high shares of VRE. 

  • 28.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Energy security prospects in Cyprus and Israel: A focus on natural gas2014In: International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management, ISSN 2246-2929, E-ISSN 2246-2929, Vol. 3, p. 5-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global production of natural gas has increased from 1226 bcm in 1973 to 3282 bcm in 2010 and is projected to continue rising by an annual growth rate of 1.6% between 2010 to 2035. Cyprus and Israel have recently made major offshore discoveries of natural gas, which can supply to a great extent the two countries’ current domestic energy needs for the next few decades and still export a substantial volume. MESSAGE, a global optimization model was used to explore the possible interactions between the two countries’ energy systems. Scenarios are presented that assess the export potential for electricity (generated by gas-fired power plants), liquefied natural gas (LNG) or gas-to-liquid products (GTL). The results are compared to a scenario without any available reserves to illustrate the financial benefits that will arise from the exploitation of the gas resources in the two countries.

  • 29.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mofor, Linus
    An indicative analysis of investment opportunities in the African electricity supply sector: Using TEMBA (The Electricity Model Base for Africa)2016In: Energy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-0826, Vol. 31, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Africa is a resource-rich continent but lacks the required power infrastructure. Efforts such as the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All and U.S. President Obama's Power Africa initiatives aim to facilitate much needed investment. However, no systematic national and regional investment outlook is available to analysts. This paper examines indicative scenarios of power plant investments based on potential for electricity trade. OSeMOSYS, a cost-optimization tool for long-term energy planning, is used to develop least cost system configurations. The electricity supply systems of forty-seven countries are modelled individually and linked via trade links to form TEMBA (The Electricity Model Base for Africa). A scenario comparison up to 2040 shows that an enhanced grid network can alter Africa's generation mix and reduce electricity generation cost. The insights have important investment, trade and policy implications, as specific projects can be identified as of major significance, and thus receive political support and funding.

  • 30.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Taibi, E.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Technoeconomic assumptions adopted for the development of a long-term electricity supply model for Cyprus2017In: Data in Brief, ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 14, p. 730-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generation mix of Cyprus has been dominated by oil products for decades. In order to conform with European Union and international legislation, a transformation of the supply system is called for. Energy system models can facilitate energy planning into the future, but a large volume of data is required to populate such models. The present data article provides information on key modelling assumptions and input data adopted with the aim of representing the electricity supply system of Cyprus in a separate research article. Data in regards to renewable energy technoeconomic characteristics and investment cost projections, fossil fuel price projections, storage technology characteristics and system operation assumptions are described in this article.

1 - 30 of 30
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