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  • 1.
    An, Junxue
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Jin, Chunsheng
    Dėdinaitė, Andra
    Holgerssond, Jan
    Karlssonb, Niclas G.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Influence of Glycosylation on Interfacial Properties of Recombinant Mucins: Adsorption, Surface Forces and FrictionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfacial properties of two brush-with-anchor mucins, C-P55 and C-PSLex, have been investigated at the aqueous solution/poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) interface. Both are recombinant mucin-type fusion proteins, produced by fusing the glycosylated mucin part of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSLG-1) to the Fc part of a mouse immunoglobulin in two different cells. They are mainly expressed as dimers upon production. Analysis of the O-glycans shows that the C-PSLex mucin has the longer and more branched side chains, but C-P55 has slightly higher sialic acid content. The adsorption of the mucins to PMMA surfaces was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The sensed mass, including the adsorbed mucin and water trapped in the layer, was found to be similar for these two mucin layers. Atomic force microscopy with colloidal probe was employed to study surface and friction forces between mucin-coated PMMA surfaces. Purely repulsive forces of steric origin were observed between mucin layers on compression, whereas a small adhesion was detected between both mucin layers on decompression. This was attributed to chain entanglement. The friction force between C-PSLex-coated PMMA is lower than that between C-P55-coated PMMA at low loads, but vice versa at high loads. We discuss our results in terms of the differences in the glycosylation composition of these two mucins.

  • 2.
    Beldowski, Piotr
    et al.
    UTP Univ Sci & Technol, Inst Math & Phys, Al Kaliskiego 7, PL-85796 Bydgoszcz, Poland..
    Weber, Piotr
    Gdansk Univ Technol, Atom & Opt Phys Div, Dept Atom Mol & Opt Phys, Fac Appl Phys & Math, Narutowicza 11-12, PL-80233 Gdansk, Poland..
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gadomski, Adam
    UTP Univ Sci & Technol, Inst Math & Phys, Al Kaliskiego 7, PL-85796 Bydgoszcz, Poland..
    Physical crosslinking of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids in an aqueous nano-environment2018In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 14, no 44, p. 8997-9004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyaluronic acid and phospholipids are two components in the synovial joint cavity that contribute to joint lubrication synergistically. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed and hydrogen bonds in hyaluronic acid were analyzed to identify specific sites that are responsible for its physical cross-linking. Two molecular masses of hyaluronic acid, 10 kDa and 160 kDa, were considered. We use molecular dynamics simulations and the small world network approach to investigate dynamic couplings using a distance map applied to oxygen atoms in a chain of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids and water. The distance characterizing the coupling can be defined in various ways to bring out the most evident differences between various scenarios of the polymer chain conformation We show herein a physical distance understood as H-bond length and classes of these distances which are defined in a coarse-grained picture of the molecule. Simulation results indicate that addition of phospholipids has little influence on hyaluronic acid crosslinking. However, longer chains and addition of lipids promote appreciably long lasting (resilient) networks that may be of importance in biological systems. Specific sites for hydrogen bonding of phospholipids to hyaluronic acid have also been identified.

  • 3. Bełdowski, P.
    et al.
    Weber, P.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Gadomski, A.
    Correction: Physical crosslinking of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids in an aqueous nano-environment (Soft Matter (2018) DOI: 10.1039/c8sm01388h)2018In: Soft Matter, Vol. 14, no 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correction for 'Physical crosslinking of hyaluronic acid in the presence of phospholipids in an aqueous nano-environment' by Piotr Bełdowski et al., Soft Matter, 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c8sm01388h. 

  • 4.
    Claesson, Per M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    He, Yunjuan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Li, Gen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Surface Nanomechanics of Coatings and Hydrogels2019In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Physics Publishing , 2019, no 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the increasing use of nanostructured materials and thin coatings as barrier materials, it has become of high importance to measure and understand material properties on the nm to 100 nm length scales. In this article we demonstrate and discuss how atomic force microscopy techniques can be used to this end. It is demonstrated that the classical analysis based on the assumption of a purely elastic material response is a fair approximation for relatively stiff coatings (elastic modulus order of GPa), whereas viscous responses must be considered for soft materials (apparent modulus order of MPa) such as hydrogels.

  • 5.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    How synergistic aqueous lubrication is mediated by natural and synthetic molecular aggregates2019In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Physics Publishing , 2019, no 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature lubricates in aqueous environment, and thus the example of a human synovial joint with its seamless function has been a fascination for scientists since the times of the birth of modern science. Here, inspired by nature, we investigate the mechanistic function of three different types of synergistic molecular aggregates. Firstly, we show how simple phospholipids lubricate hydrophilic model surfaces of silica and how this lubrication is facilitated further by the presence of an anionic polysaccharide, hyaluronan, due to the enhanced surface build-up of lubricant material. Next, we mimic natural polylectrolytesurfactant aggregation by employing a highly positively charged polyelectrolyte and anionic surfactant that strongly associate both in the bulk and at the surfaces by building structured aggregates that lubricate due to hydration lubrication. This occurs despite of the presence of strong attraction between the lubricated surfaces. This is an example of synergistic lubrication due to particular internal structural arrangement of the aggregates. Finally, we investigate the case of synergistic lubrication due to preferential surface ordering of two biological polyelectrolytes, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and lubricin, that leads to favourable lubrication.

  • 6.
    Dobryden, Illia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ruiz, Maria Cortes
    CUNY City Coll, Dept Chem Engn, Grove Sch Engn, New York, NY 10031 USA..
    Zhang, Xuwei
    Univ Montreal, Dept Chem, CP 6128 Succursale Ctr Ville, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada..
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wieland, D. C. Florian
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Inst Mat Res, Max Planck Str 1, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany..
    Winnik, Francoise M.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Chem, POB 55, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.;NIMS, Int Ctr Mat Nanoarchitecton MANA, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044, Japan..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Thermoresponsive Pentablock Copolymer on Silica: Temperature Effects on Adsorption, Surface Forces, and Friction2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 653-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of hydrophilic or amphiphilic multiblock copolymers provides a powerful means to produce well-defined "smart" surfaces, especially if one or several blocks are sensitive to external stimuli. We focus here on an A-B-A-B-A copolymer, where A is a cationic poly((3acrylamido-propyl)-trimethylammonium chloride) (PAMPTMA) block containing 15 (end blocks) or 30 (middle block) repeat units and B is a neutral thermosensitive water-soluble poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) (PIPOZ) block with 50 repeat units. X-ray reflectivity and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were employed to study the adsorption of PAMPTMA(15)-PAMPTMA(30)-PIPOZ(50)-PAMPTMA(15) on silica surfaces. The latter technique was employed at different temperatures up to 50 degrees C. Surface forces and friction between the two silica surfaces across aqueous pentablock copolymer solutions at different temperatures were determined with the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe force and friction measurements. The cationic pentablock copolymer was found to have a high affinity to the negatively charged silica surface, leading to a thin (2 nm) and rigid adsorbed layer. A steric force was encountered at a separation of around 3 nm from hard wall contact. A capillary condensation of a polymer-rich phase was observed at the cloud point of the solution. The friction forces were evaluated using Amontons' rule modified with an adhesion term.

  • 7. Ducker, William
    et al.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Editorial Overview - Surface Forces2017In: Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, ISSN 1359-0294, E-ISSN 1879-0399, Vol. 27, p. A1-A2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat Surface, Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tuominen, Mikko
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat Surface, Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jarn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat Surface, Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials − Surface, Process and Formulation, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat Surface, Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Butt, Hans Juergen
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, Dept Phys Interfaces, Ackermannweg 10, DE-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Vollmer, Doris
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, Dept Phys Interfaces, Ackermannweg 10, DE-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Kappl, Michael
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, Dept Phys Interfaces, Ackermannweg 10, DE-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Gane, Patrick A. C.
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland.;Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland..
    Teisala, Hannu
    Max Planck Inst Polymer Res, Dept Phys Interfaces, Ackermannweg 10, DE-55128 Mainz, Germany..
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat Surface, Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Direct Observation of Gas Meniscus Formation on a Superhydrophobic Surface2019In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 2246-2252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of a bridging gas meniscus via cavitation or nanobubbles is considered the most likely origin of the submicrometer long-range attractive forces measured between hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous solution. However, the dynamics of the formation and evolution of the gas meniscus is still under debate, in particular, in the presence of a thin air layer on a superhydrophobic surface. On superhydrophobic surfaces the range can even exceed 10 mu m. Here, we report microscopic images of the formation and growth of a gas meniscus during force measurements between a superhydrophobic surface and a hydrophobic microsphere immersed in water. This is achieved by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy and colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. The configuration allows determination of the volume and shape of the meniscus, together with direct calculation of the Young-Laplace capillary pressure. The long-range attractive interactions acting on separation are due to meniscus formation and volume growth as air is transported from the surface layer.

  • 9.
    He, Yunjuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Deltin, Tomas
    PTE Coatings AB, Hammarsvagen 4, SE-59432 Gamleby, Sweden..
    Corkery, Robert W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nano-scale mechanical and wear properties of a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine anti-corrosion coating2018In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 457, p. 548-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion protection is commonly achieved by applying a thin polymer coating on the metal surface. Many studies have been devoted to local events occurring at the metal surface leading to local or general corrosion. In contrast, changes occurring in the organic coating after exposure to corrosive conditions are much less studied. In this article we outline how changes in the coating itself due to curing conditions, environmental and erosion effects can be investigated at the nanometer scale, and discuss how such changes would affect its corrosion protection performance. We focus on a waterborne hydroxyacrylic-melamine coating, showing high corrosion protection performance for carbon steel during long-term (approximate to 35 days) exposure to 0.1 M NaCl solution. The effect of curing time on the conversion of the crosslinking reaction within the coating was evaluated by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR); the wetting properties of the cured films were investigated by contact angle measurement, and the corrosion resistance was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In particular, coating nanomechanical and wear properties before and after exposure to 0.1 M NaCl, were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fiber-like surface features were observed after exposure, which are suggested to arise due to diffusion of monomers or low molecular weight polymers to the surface. This may give rise to local weakening of the coating, leading to local corrosion after even longer exposure times. We also find a direct correlation between the stick-slip spacing during shearing and plastic deformation induced in the surface layer, giving rise to topographical ripple structures on the nanometer length scale.

  • 10.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Chaudhary, Himanshu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Wei, Zheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lendel, Christofer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Synergistic effects of metal-induced aggregation of human serum albumin2019In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 173, p. 751-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni) occurs often via skin contact and from different dental and orthopedic implants. The metal ions bind to proteins, which may induce structural changes and aggregation, with different medical consequences. We investigated human serum albumin (HSA) aggregation in the presence of Co-II, Cr-III, and/or Ni-II ions and/or their nanoparticle precipitates by using scattering, spectroscopic, and imaging techniques, at simulated physiological conditions (phosphate buffered saline - PBS, pH 7.3) using metal salts that did not affect the pH, and at HSA:metal molar ratios of up to 1:8. Co ions formed some solid nano particles in PBS at the investigated conditions, as determined by nanoparticle tracking analysis, but the Cr-III anions and Ni-II ions remained fully soluble. It was found that all metal ions induced HSA aggregation, and this effect was significantly enhanced when a mixture of all three metal ions was present instead of any single type of ion. Thus, the metal ions induce aggregation synergistically. HSA aggregates formed linear structures on a mica surface in the presence of Cr-III ions. A clear tendency of aggregation and linearly aligned aggregates was seen in the presence of all three metal ions. Spectroscopic investigations indicated that the majority of the HSA molecules maintained their alpha helical secondary structure and conformation. This study highlights the importance of synergistic effects of metal ions and/or their precipitates on protein aggregation, which are highly relevant for implant materials and common exposures to metals.

  • 11.
    Hermanowska, Malgorzata
    et al.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Phys & Chem, Odense M, Denmark.;Univ Southern Denmark, MEMPHYS, Odense M, Denmark..
    Bijelic, Goran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Ciobanasu, Corina
    Univ Bonn, Inst Phys & Theoret Chem, Bonn, Germany..
    Kubitscheck, Ulrich
    Univ Bonn, Inst Phys & Theoret Chem, Bonn, Germany..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Klosgen, Beate M.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Phys & Chem, Odense M, Denmark.;Univ Southern Denmark, MEMPHYS, Odense M, Denmark..
    Charges in phospholipid layers2009In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 18A-18AArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Local surface mechanical properties of PDMS-silica nanocomposite probed with Intermodulation AFMManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Huang, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Shandong University, China.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ihrner, Niklas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Ma, Houyi
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Temperature-dependent surface nanomechanical properties of a thermoplastic nanocomposite2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 494, p. 204-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In polymer nanocomposites, particle-polymer interactions influence the properties of the matrix polymer next to the particle surface, providing different physicochemical properties than in the bulk matrix. This region is often referred to as the interphase, but detailed characterization of its properties remains a challenge. Here we employ two atomic force microscopy (AFM) force methods, differing by a factor of about 15 in probing rate, to directly measure the surface nanomechanical properties of the transition region between filler particle and matrix over a controlled temperature range. The nanocomposite consists of poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and poly(isobutyl methacrylate) (PiBMA) with a high concentration of hydrophobized silica nanoparticles. Both AFM methods demonstrate that the interphase region around a 40-nm-sized particle located on the surface of the nanocomposite could extend to 55–70 nm, and the interphase exhibits a gradient distribution in surface nanomechanical properties. However, the slower probing rate provides somewhat lower numerical values for the surface stiffness. The analysis of the local glass transition temperature (Tg) of the interphase and the polymer matrix provides evidence for reduced stiffness of the polymer matrix at high particle concentration, a feature that we attribute to selective adsorption. These findings provide new insight into understanding the microstructure and mechanical properties of nanocomposites, which is of importance for designing nanomaterials.

  • 14.
    Kharitonov, D. S.
    et al.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Dept Chem Technol Electrochem Prod & Elect Engn M, Minsk 220006, Byelarus.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Surface & Corros Sci Div, Drottning Kristinas Vag 51, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sefer, B.
    Lulea Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, SE-97187 Lulea, Sweden..
    Zharskii, I. M.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Dept Chem Technol Electrochem Prod & Elect Engn M, Minsk 220006, Byelarus..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Kurilo, I. I.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Dept Phys Colloid & Analyt Chem, Minsk 220006, Byelarus..
    Corrosion of AD31 (AA6063) Alloy in Chloride-Containing Solutions2018In: PROTECTION OF METALS AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF SURFACES, ISSN 2070-2051, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion of AD31 (AA6063) alloy in neutral 0.05 M NaCl solutions is investigated via scanningprobe microscopy, linear-sweep voltammetry, and electrochemical-impedance spectroscopy. Al-Fe-Si-Mg intermetallic particles are determined to prevail in the structure of alloy and act as local cathodes. Intermodulation electrostatic-force-microscopy imaging shows that their Volta potential differs by 570 mV from that of the host aluminum matrix, making the alloy prone to localized corrosion. We show that the corrosion of alloy in the studied electrolyte mainly develops locally and results in pitting, with charge transfer being the limiting stage of the process. A mechanism of corrosion of the AD31 (AA6063) alloy in neutral chloride-containing solutions is proposed.

  • 15.
    Kharitonov, Dmitry S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Surface Proc & Formulat, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Örnek, Cem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Ryl, Jacek
    Gdansk Univ Technol, Dept Electrochem Corros & Mat Engn, 11-12 Narutowicza St, PL-80233 Gdansk, Poland..
    Kurilo, Irina I.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Organ Subst Technol Fac, Dept Phys Colloid & Analyt Chem, Minsk 220006, BELARUS..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Corrosion inhibition of aluminium alloy AA6063-T5 by vanadates: Local surface chemical events elucidated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy2019In: CORROSION SCIENCE, Vol. 148, p. 237-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical interactions between aqueous vanadium species and aluminium alloy AA6063-T5 were investigated in vanadate-containing NaCl solutions. Confocal Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments were utilised to gain insight into the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by vanadates. A greenish-grey coloured surface layer, consisting of V+4 and V+5 polymerized species, was seen to form on the alloy surface, especially on top of cathodic micrometre-sized IMPs, whereby suppressing oxygen reduction kinetics. The results suggest a two-step mechanism of corrosion inhibition in which V+5 species are first reduced to V+4 or V+3 species above cathodic IMPs, and then oxidized to mixed-valence V+5/V+4 polymerized compounds.

  • 16.
    Kharitonov, Dmitry S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Belarusian State Technol Univ, Chem Technol & Engn Fac, Dept Chem Electrochem Prod Technol & Mat Elect Eq, Minsk 220006, BELARUS..
    Örnek, Cem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Swerea KIMAB, Dept Corros Energy & Proc Ind, SE-16440 Kista, Sweden..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sommertune, Jens
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Chem Mat & Surfaces, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zharskii, Ivan M.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Chem Technol & Engn Fac, Dept Chem Electrochem Prod Technol & Mat Elect Eq, Minsk 220006, BELARUS..
    Kurilo, Irina I.
    Belarusian State Technol Univ, Organ Subst Technol Fac, Dept Phys Colloid & Analyt Chem, Minsk 220006, BELARUS..
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloy AA6063-T5 by Vanadates: Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Analysis2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 3, p. C116-C126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA6063-T5 by vanadates (NaVO3) in 0.05 M NaCl solution has been investigated by electrochemical and weight loss measurements, and associated with microstructure and Volta potential data. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirmed the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-rich Al4.01MnSi0.74, Al1.69Mg4Zn2.31, and FeAl3 intermetallic phases (IMPs) and nanometer-sized CuAl2, ZnAl2, and Mg2Si precipitates in the microstructure. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements showed Volta potential differences of up to 600 mV between the microstructure constituents indicating a high susceptibility to micro-galvanic corrosion, with interphase boundary regions exhibiting the highest propensity to corrosion. Most IMPs had cathodic character whereas some nanometer-sized Mg-rich particles exhibited anodic nature, with large Volta potential gradients within interphase regions of large cathodic particles. Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the vanadates provided mixed corrosion inhibition effects, mitigating both oxygen reduction, occurring on cathodic IMPs, and anodic metal dissolution reaction, occurring on anodic sites, such as Mg2Si and interphase boundary regions. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the sodium metavanadate inhibitor blocks active metal dissolution, giving high inhibition efficiency (>95%) during the initial exposure, whereas long-term weight loss measurements showed that the efficacy decreases after prolonged exposure.

  • 17. Lee, Jookyeong
    et al.
    Choi, Eun Jung
    Varga, Imre
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Yun, Sang-Ho
    Song, Changsik
    Terpyridine-functionalized stimuli-responsive microgels and their assembly through metal-ligand interactions2018In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 1032-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed a terpyridine-functionalized microgel (tpy-mG) for its supramolecular assembly. Tpy-mG was synthesized by amidation between 3-(4-([2,2':6',2 ''-terpyridin]-4'-yl)phenoxy) propan-1-amine and carboxylates of a thermo-responsive p(NIPAM-co-MAA) microgel (A-mG), which was synthesized by emulsion polymerization. After decorating terpyridine, its effects on the hydrodynamic radius, volume phase transition temperature (VPTT), and the colloidal stability of the microgel were investigated. Tpy-mG can be assembled reversibly with several metal ions (Ni2+, Fe2+, Co2+, or Zn2+), and interestingly the assembled tpy-mG-M2+ showed different rheological properties depending on the metal ion type; the weakly bound ions (Co2+, Zn2+) indicated fast dynamics for "inter-particular" exchange, resulting in much higher storage (G') and loss (G '') moduli. Photocatalysts such as Ru dyes can be easily introduced into tpy-mG via metal-ligand interactions, and the photooxidation of benzylamine was tested. The free Ru dye showed almost the same conversions at 25 and 50 degrees C, whereas the assembled Ru-tpy-mG-Mg2+ displayed reduced conversion at 50 degrees C (>VPTT). This is suggested to be due to the collapsed or "locked" structure around the photocatalytic center (Ru). Tpy-mG can be utilized as a good platform for developing responsive functional materials via reversible metal-ligand complexation.

  • 18. Niga, P.
    et al.
    Hansson-Mille, P. M.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE – Research Institute of Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE – Research Institute of Sweden.
    Schoelkopf, J.
    Gane, P. A. C.
    Bergendal, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tummino, A.
    Campbell, R. A.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Interactions between model cell membranes and the neuroactive drug propofol2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 526, p. 230-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) complemented by surface pressure isotherm and neutron reflectometry (NR) experiments were employed to investigate the interactions between propofol, a small amphiphilic molecule that currently is the most common general anaesthetic drug, and phospholipid monolayers. A series of biologically relevant saturated phospholipids of varying chain length from C18 to C14 were spread on either pure water or propofol (2,6-bis(1-methylethyl)phenol) solution in a Langmuir trough, and the change in the molecular structure of the film, induced by the interaction with propofol, was studied with respect to the surface pressure. The results from the surface pressure isotherm experiments revealed that propofol, as long as it remains at the interface, enhances the fluidity of the phospholipid monolayer. The VSF spectra demonstrate that for each phospholipid the amount of propofol in the monolayer region decreases with increasing surface pressure. Such squeeze out is in contrast to the enhanced interactions that can be exhibited by more complex amphiphilic molecules such as peptides. At surface pressures of 22–25 mN m−1, which are relevant for biological cell membranes, most of the propofol has been expelled from the monolayer, especially in the case of the C16 and C18 phospholipids that adopt a liquid condensed phase packing of its alkyl tails. At lower surface pressures of 5 mN m−1, the effect of propofol on the structure of the alkyl tails is enhanced when the phospholipids are present in a liquid expanded phase. Specifically, for the C16 phospholipid, NR data reveal that propofol is located exclusively in the head group region, which is rationalized in the context of previous studies. The results imply a non-homogeneous distribution of propofol in the plane of real cell membranes, which is an inference that requires urgent testing and may help to explain why such low concentration of the drug are required to induce general anaesthesia.

  • 19.
    Niga, Petru
    et al.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden Chem Mat & Surfaces, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansson-Mille, Petra M.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden Chem Mat & Surfaces, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Gane, Patrick A. C.
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland.;Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Technol, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, FI-00076 Helsinki, Finland..
    Dai, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Campbell, Richard A.
    Inst Laue Langevin, 71 Ave Martyrs,CS20156, F-38042 Grenoble 9, France.;Univ Manchester, Div Pharm & Optometry, Manchester M13 9PT, Lancs, England..
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Propofol adsorption at the air/water interface: a combined vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron reflectometry study2019In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Propofol is an amphiphilic small molecule that strongly influences the function of cell membranes, yet data regarding interfacial properties of propofol remain scarce. Here we consider propofol adsorption at the air/water interface as elucidated by means of vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), neutron reflectometry (NR), and surface tensiometry. VSFS data show that propofol adsorbed at the air/ water interface interacts with water strongly in terms of hydrogen bonding and weakly in the proximity of the hydrocarbon parts of the molecule. In the concentration range studied there is almost no change in the orientation adopted at the interface. Data from NR show that propofol forms a dense monolayer with a thickness of 8.4 angstrom and a limiting area per molecule of 40 angstrom(2), close to the value extracted from surface tensiometry. The possibility that islands or multilayers of propofol form at the air/water interface is therefore excluded as long as the solubility limit is not exceeded. Additionally, measurements of the 1H NMR chemical shifts demonstrate that propofol does not form dimers or multimers in bulk water up to the solubility limit.

  • 20.
    Raj, Akanksha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wang, Min
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Zander, Thomas
    Wieland, D. C. Florian
    Liu, Xiaoyan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    An, Junxue
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Garamus, Vasil M.
    Willumeit-Roemer, Regine
    Fielden, Matthew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Sweden.
    Lubrication synergy: Mixture of hyaluronan and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles2017In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 488, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phospholipids and hyaluronan have been implied to fulfil important roles in synovial joint lubrication. Since both components are present in synovial fluid, self-assembly structures formed by them should also be present. We demonstrate by small angle X-ray scattering that hyaluronan associates with the outer shell of dipalmitoylphophatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles in bulk solution. Further, we follow adsorption to silica from mixed hyaluronan/DPPC vesicle solution by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation measurements. Atomic Force Microscope imaging visualises the adsorbed layer structure consisting of non-homogeneous phospholipid bilayer with hyaluronan/DPPC aggregates on top. The presence of these aggregates generates a long-range repulsive surface force as two such surfaces are brought together. However, the aggregates are easily deformed, partly rearranged into multilayer structures and partly removed from between the surfaces under high loads. These layers offer very low friction coefficient (<0.01), high load bearing capacity (approximate to 23 MPa), and self-healing ability. Surface bound DPPC/hyaluronan aggregates provide a means for accumulation of lubricating DPPC molecules on sliding surfaces.

  • 21.
    Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials. SP Tech Res Inst Sweden Chem Mat & Surfaces, Sweden.
    Van den Bulcke, Jan
    Wålinder, Magnus E. P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Van Acker, Joris
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Microstructure of chemically modified wood using X-ray computed tomography in relation to wetting properties2017In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the 2D and 3D microstructure of acetylated southern yellow pine (pine) and maple, as well as furfurylated pine samples. The total porosity and the porosity of different cell types, as well as cell wall thickness and maximum opening of tracheid lumens were evaluated. The wetting properties (swelling and capillary uptake) were related to these microstructural characteristics. The data show significant changes in the wood structure for furfurylated pine sapwood samples, including a change in tracheid shape and filling of tracheids by furan polymer. In contrast, no such changes were noted for the acetylated pine samples at the high resolution of 0.8 mu m. The XCT images obtained for the furfurylated maple samples demonstrated that all ray cells and some vessel elements were filled with furan polymer while the fibers largely remained unchanged. Furfurylation significantly decreased the total porosity of both the maple and pine samples. Furthermore, this was observed in both earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) regions in the pine samples. In contrast, the total porosity of pine samples was hardly affected by acetylation. These findings are in line with wetting results demonstrating that furfurylation reduces both swelling and capillary uptake in contrast to acetylation which reduces mostly swelling. Furfurylation significantly increased the cell wall thickness of both the maple and pine samples, especially at higher levels of furfurylation.

  • 22.
    Thorén, Per-Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Borgani, Riccardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics. KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Dobryden, Illia
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Kassa, Hailu G.
    Univ Mons, Ctr Innovat & Res Mat & Polymers, Lab Chem Novel Mat, Pl Parc 20, B-7000 Mons, Belgium..
    Leclere, Philippe
    Univ Mons, Ctr Innovat & Res Mat & Polymers, Lab Chem Novel Mat, Pl Parc 20, B-7000 Mons, Belgium..
    Wang, Yifan
    Univ Chicago, James Franck Inst, 929 East 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Jaeger, Heinrich M. .
    Univ Chicago, James Franck Inst, 929 East 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 USA..
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Modeling and Measuring Viscoelasticity with Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy2018In: Physical Review Applied, E-ISSN 2331-7019, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 024017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction between a rapidly oscillating atomic-force-microscope tip and a soft-material surface is described with use of both elastic and viscous forces in a moving-surface model. We present the simplest form of this model, motivating our derivation with the models ability to capture the impact dynamics of the tip and sample with an interaction consisting of two components: interfacial or surface force, and bulk or volumetric force. Analytic solutions to the piecewise linear model identify characteristic time constants, providing a physical explanation for the hysteresis observed in the measured dynamic-force-quadrature curves. Numerical simulation is used to fit the model to experimental data, and excellent agreement is found with a variety of different samples. The model parameters form a dimensionless impact-rheology factor, giving a quantitative physical number to characterize a viscoelastic surface that does not depend on the tip shape or cantilever frequency.

  • 23.
    Thorén, Per-Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Borgani, Riccardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Forchheimer, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Kassa, Hailu G.
    Leclère, Philippe
    Wang, Yifan
    Jaeger, Heinrich
    Haviland, David B.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    On modeling and measuring viscoelasticity with dynamic Atomic Force MicroscopyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Tyrode, Eric
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Johnson, C M
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Kumpulainen, A
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Hydration state of non-ionic surfactant monolayers at the liquid/vapor interface: Structure determination by vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS)2005In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 230, p. U2904-U2905Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tyrode, Eric
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    COLL 153-Molecular ordering at the liquid/air interface and hydration of surfactants2006In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 232Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26. Wieland, D. C. F.
    et al.
    Zander, T.
    Garamus, V. M.
    Krywka, C.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Willumeit-Roemer, R.
    Complex solutions under shear and pressure: a rheometer setup for X-ray scattering experiments2017In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 24, p. 646-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A newly developed high-pressure rheometer for in situ X-ray scattering experiments is described. A commercial rheometer was modified in such a way that X-ray scattering experiments can be performed under different pressures and shear. First experiments were carried out on hyaluronan, a ubiquitous biopolymer that is important for different functions in the body such as articular joint lubrication. The data hint at a decreased electrostatic interaction at higher pressure, presumably due to the increase of the dielectric constant of water by 3% and the decrease of the free volume at 300bar.

  • 27.
    Winnik, Francoise
    et al.
    Univ Montreal, Dept Chem, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;Natl Inst Mat Sci, Int Ctr Mat Nanoarchitecton MANA, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Temperature-dependent assembly of thermosensitive cationic diblock copolymers in water and on interfaces2017In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 254Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Wojas, Natalia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, CHE Surface & Corros Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jarn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Biosci & Mat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gane, Patrick
    Omya Int AG, Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya Int AG, Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Adam, Marcus
    Omya Int AG, Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Adsorption of water and gaseous species on calcite surfaces at different relative humidity and temperature2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Wojas, Natalia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat Surface Proc & Formulat, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat Surface Proc & Formulat, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallqvist, Viveca
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat Surface Proc & Formulat, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jarn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat Surface Proc & Formulat, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Schoelkop, Joachim
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland..
    Gane, Patrick A. C.
    Omya Int AG, Baslerstr 42, CH-4665 Oftringen, Switzerland.;Aalto Univ, Sch Chem Engn, Dept Bioprod & Biosyst, POB 16300, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat Surface Proc & Formulat, Box 5607, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Iceland spar calcite: Humidity and time effects on surface properties and their reversibility2019In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 541, p. 42-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the complex and dynamic nature of calcite surfaces under ambient conditions is important for optimizing industrial applications. It is essential to identify processes, their reversibility, and the relevant properties of CaCO3 solid-liquid and solid-gas interfaces under different environmental conditions, such as at increased relative humidity (RH). This work elucidates changes in surface properties on freshly cleaved calcite (topography, wettability and surface forces) as a function of time (<= 28 h) at controlled humidity (<= 3-95 %RH) and temperature (25.5 degrees C), evaluated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle techniques. In the presence of humidity, the wettability decreased, liquid water capillary forces dominated over van der Waals forces, and surface domains, such as hillocks, height about 7.0 angstrom, and trenches, depth about -3.5 angstrom, appeared and grew primarily in lateral dimensions. Hillocks demonstrated lower adhesion and higher deformation in AFM experiments. We propose that the growing surface domains were formed by ion dissolution and diffusion followed by formation of hydrated salt of CaCO3. Upon drying, the height of the hillocks decreased by about 50% suggesting their alteration into dehydrated or less hydrated CaCO3. However, the process was not entirely reversible and crystallization of new domains continued at a reduced rate.

  • 30.
    Yan, Hongji
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Chircov, Cristina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhong, Xueying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Winkeljann, Benjamin
    Tech Univ Munich, Dept Mech Engn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Munich Sch Bioengn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nilsson, Harriet Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Lieleg, Oliver
    Tech Univ Munich, Dept Mech Engn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Munich Sch Bioengn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Reversible Condensation of Mucins into Nanoparticles2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 45, p. 13615-13625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucins are high molar mass glycoproteins that assume an extended conformation and can assemble into mucus hydrogels that protect our mucosal epithelium. In nature, the challenging task of generating a mucus layer, several hundreds of micrometers in thickness, from micrometer-sized cells is elegantly solved by the condensation of mucins inside vesicles and their on-demand release from the cells where they suddenly expand to form the extracellular mucus hydrogel. We aimed to recreate and control the process of compaction for mucins, the first step toward a better understanding of the process and creating biomimetic in vivo delivery strategies of macromolecules. We found that by adding glycerol to the aqueous solvent, we could induce drastic condensation of purified mucin molecules, reducing their size by an order of magnitude down to tens of nanometers in diameter. The condensation effect of glycerol was fully reversible and could be further enhanced and partially stabilized by cationic cross-linkers such as calcium and polylysine. The change of structure of mucins from extended molecules to nano-sized particles in the presence of glycerol translated into macroscopic rheological changes, as illustrated by a dampened shear-thinning effect with increasing glycerol concentration. This work provides new insight into mucin condensation, which could lead to new delivery strategies mimicking cell release of macromolecules condensed in vesicles such as mucins and heparin.

1 - 30 of 30
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