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  • 1.
    Byström, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Eklund, Martin
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Czene, Kamila
    Hall, Per
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Affinity proteomic profiling of plasma for proteins associated to area-based mammographic breast density2018In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 20, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but molecular understanding of how breast density relates to cancer risk is less complete. Studies of proteins in blood plasma, possibly associated with mammographic density, are well-suited as these allow large-scale analyses and might shed light on the association between breast cancer and breast density. Methods: Plasma samples from 1329 women in the Swedish KARMA project, without prior history of breast cancer, were profiled with antibody suspension bead array (SBA) assays. Two sample sets comprising 729 and 600 women were screened by two different SBAs targeting a total number of 357 proteins. Protein targets were selected through searching the literature, for either being related to breast cancer or for being linked to the extracellular matrix. Association between proteins and absolute area-based breast density (AD) was assessed by quantile regression, adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Results: Plasma profiling revealed linear association between 20 proteins and AD, concordant in the two sets of samples (p < 0.05). Plasma levels of seven proteins were positively associated and 13 proteins negatively associated with AD. For eleven of these proteins evidence for gene expression in breast tissue existed. Among these, ABCC11, TNFRSF10D, F11R and ERRF were positively associated with AD, and SHC1, CFLAR, ACOX2, ITGB6, RASSF1, FANCD2 and IRX5 were negatively associated with AD. Conclusions: Screening proteins in plasma indicates associations between breast density and processes of tissue homeostasis, DNA repair, cancer development and/or progression in breast cancer. Further validation and follow-up studies of the shortlisted protein candidates in independent cohorts will be needed to infer their role in breast density and its progression in premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  • 2.
    Byström, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Eklund, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Czene, Kamila
    Hall, Per
    Schwenk, Jochen. M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Affinity proteomic profiling of plasma for proteins associated to mammographic breast densityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Byström, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik
    Nyaiesh, Etienne-Nicholas
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Matthias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Affinity proteomics exploration of melanoma identifies proteins in serum with associations to T-stage and recurrenceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ioannou, Marina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tamburro, Davide
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Sci Life Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Branca, Rui M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lehtio, Janne
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic assessment of antibody selectivity in plasma based on a resource of enrichment profiles2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 8324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong need for procedures that enable context and application dependent validation of antibodies. Here, we applied a magnetic bead assisted workflow and immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry (IP-MS/MS) to assess antibody selectivity for the detection of proteins in human plasma. A resource was built on 414 IP experiments using 157 antibodies (targeting 120 unique proteins) in assays with heat-treated or untreated EDTA plasma. For each protein we determined their antibody related degrees of enrichment using z-scores and their frequencies of identification across all IP assays. Out of 1,313 unique endogenous proteins, 426 proteins (33%) were detected in >20% of IPs, and these background components were mainly comprised of proteins from the complement system. For 45% (70/157) of the tested antibodies, the expected target proteins were enriched (z-score >= 3). Among these 70 antibodies, 59 (84%) co-enriched other proteins beside the intended target and mainly due to sequence homology or protein abundance. We also detected protein interactions in plasma, and for IGFBP2 confirmed these using several antibodies and sandwich immunoassays. The protein enrichment data with plasma provide a very useful and yet lacking resource for the assessment of antibody selectivity. Our insights will contribute to a more informed use of affinity reagents for plasma proteomics assays.

  • 5.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bendes, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, 9010, Norway.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Uhlèn, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, 2970, Denmark.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Bromma, 168 69, Sweden.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, article id 1900008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma proteome offers a clinically useful window into human health. Recent advances from highly multiplexed assays now call for appropriate pipelines to validate individual candidates. Here, a workflow is developed to build dual binder sandwich immunoassays (SIA) and for proteins predicted to be secreted into plasma. Utilizing suspension bead arrays, ≈1800 unique antibody pairs are first screened against 209 proteins with recombinant proteins as well as EDTA plasma. Employing 624 unique antibodies, dilution-dependent curves in plasma and concentration-dependent curves of full-length proteins for 102 (49%) of the targets are obtained. For 22 protein assays, the longitudinal, interindividual, and technical performance is determined in a set of plasma samples collected from 18 healthy subjects every third month over 1 year. Finally, 14 of these assays are compared with with SIAs composed of other binders, proximity extension assays, and affinity-free targeted mass spectrometry. The workflow provides a multiplexed approach to screen for SIA pairs that suggests using at least three antibodies per target. This design is applicable for a wider range of targets of the plasma proteome, and the assays can be applied for discovery but also to validate emerging candidates derived from other platforms.

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  • apa
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • en-GB
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