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  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Havtun, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Wingård, Lasse
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Andersson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kjellgren, Björn
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Language and communication.
    THE PEDAGOGICAL DEVELOPERS INITIATIVE: SYSTEMATIC SHIFTS, SERENDIPITIES, AND SETBACKS2017In: 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pedagogical projects have often, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, as well as elsewhere, been initiated and managed by individual enthusiasts rather than dedicated teams. This generally decreases the possibility of successful implementation of more ambitious ideas, e.g., changing educational programs, implementing the CDIO syllabus, or strengthening the pedagogical development of larger parts of the faculty. To enable wider and more effective change, KTH top management therefore launched a universityencompassing three-year project in 2014, in which a group of highly motivated teachers from all schools at KTH were appointed part-time pedagogical developers (PDs). The PDs were given the task of promoting pedagogical development and facilitate cooperation and knowledge exchange among faculty members, as described in two previous papers at CDIO conferences. From 2017, the outcomes of this project are supposed to be integrated parts of the KTH line organization. The project has led to numerous actions, which would have been difficult to set in motion unless given the freedom in time to explore and to develop into a collective effort rather than a myriad of individual “stand-alone” examples. By addressing key areas for pedagogical development, our group of dedicated faculty have tried to surpass the suboptimal "lock-in" of strict individual reasoning and to deal with surfaced questions and relevant issues in a broader collective manner. A major insight confirmed by the project and its many sub-projects has indeed been the fundamental importance of collegial discussions and the creation of processes that facilitate and support teacher cooperation. We have also, through discussions with faculty at KTH, confirmed the need for clearly defined, tangible incentives for teachers, motivating them to participate in pedagogical development activities, even if this means less time left for the traditional pathway to rewards within academia, i.e. research. In this paper, we chart changes that have occurred in the educational practices at KTH by describing and discussing the project’s focus on pedagogical development of faculty, actual execution of changes in the engineering educations, lessons learned along the way, and visions yet to be realised.

  • 2.
    Flening, Elias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Worlds Apart and Close Together: Relating mechatronics and project management research2018In: Proceedings of International Design Conference, DESIGN, 2018, p. 2867-2878Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While they originate from different contexts and values, the Mechatronic and Project Management research communities are both committed to the study of the process of complex engineering systems design. These two fields have generally been engaged in their research separated from each other. Recently, calls have been heard from both to end such disciplinary separation. This paper seeks to conceptually relate the two research communities, seeking to understand how they can be seen as different, related and inclusive of each other through offering three conceptual models of their relationships. 

  • 3.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Malmi, Lauri
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kinnunen, Paivi
    Aalto Univ, Dept Comp Sci, Helsinki, Finland.;Aalto Univ, Deans Unit, Sch Business, Helsinki, Finland..
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Villadsen, Jorgen
    DTU Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Appl Math & Comp Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Leading the teacher team - balancing between formal and informal power in program leadership2018In: Tertiary Education and Management, ISSN 1358-3883, E-ISSN 1573-1936, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 49-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This continuous research within Nordic engineering institutions targets the contexts and possibilities for leadership among engineering education program directors. The IFP-model, developed based on analysis of interviews with program leaders in these institutions, visualizes the program director's informal and formal power. The model is presented as a tool for starting a shared discussion on the complexities of the leadership of engineering program development. The authors liken program development to hunting in teams. Each individual expert in the program is needed, and all experts will need to work and collaborate for the same target. This calls for strategic and long-term thinking of engineering education development. Institutions should support the development of both formal structures as well as informal leadership skills among their program directors, but never fall for the temptation to see the program director as the only actor on the stage.

  • 4.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    FLIPPED EDUCATION - SUPPORTING SYSTEMS THINKING AND CDIO2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 9988-9996Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing an engineering education program is much like systems engineering. Programs have a lifecycle and will be responding differently depending on how early in the life cycle or how mature the program is. This is shown in this study in which two programs at vastly different lifecycle stages are compared, one new and one mature. The new one is still under development and implementation and is verified in terms of CDIO (Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate) and how it supports system thinking with a flipped education approach in combination with extended "flipped" aspects like gamification and close industry collaboration. The purpose is mainly to verify the concept of the new program and assess progress of a mature program. In this study, the development and continuous improvement of CDIO is compared for two programs in different life cycle stages. For comparison a self-assessment is performed using the CDIO standard 2.1.

1 - 4 of 4
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