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  • 1.
    Abourraja, Mohamed Nezar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics. Ecole Cent Casablanca, Casablanca, Morocco..
    Rouky, Naoufal
    Euro-Mediterranean University, Fez, Morocco.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. Euro Mediterranean Univ, Fes, Morocco..
    A simulation-based decision support framework devoted to Ro-Ro terminals: Design, implementation and evaluation2023In: Computers & industrial engineering, ISSN 0360-8352, E-ISSN 1879-0550, Vol. 180, p. 109248-, article id 109248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a type of intermodal terminal, pure Ro-Ro terminals are one of the most important logistic hubs in the supply chain for rolling freight stored in containerized and wheeled steel boxes. These large-scale systems are highly complex, with nonlinear and hard-to-predict behavior evolving in a stochastic environment. Consequently, making decisions about any problem thereof is no mean feat, particularly for terminal planners. To assist them in decision-making, a pool of relevant models and tools have been developed over the years in the literature. Nevertheless, models that are oriented toward specific objectives dominate, and generic ones are rare. This paper tries to fill this gap and proposes a generic framework to be used as a factory to create specific decision support models based on simulation for pure Ro-Ro terminals. This framework is formulated following two artifacts: (1) the known classification of key performance indicators combined with the typical functional and physical organization of pure Ro-Ro terminals; (2) the three main arteries of harbor systems, namely flows, decisions and operations. Then a scalable way of making decisions based on a flexible form of the cost function weighted according to a set of coefficients is integrated. These designed coefficients allow decision-makers a wide flexibly in choosing how the best solutions are determined. An application of this framework is illustrated through a real case study, where the weights are estimated using an expert-profiling based approach then pushed into the OptQuest optimizer to be calibrated before analyzing the results. These results are aggregated, then expressed as scores on a scale of 0 to 1. This is to help terminal planners to easily identify the worst and best planning scenarios as well as the relationships and compatibilities between the involved handling rules to suggest different alternatives for managing operations.

  • 2.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development, Avancerad underhållsteknik och produktionslogistik.
    Soebke, Heinrich
    Bauhaus Univ Weimar, Goethepl 7-8, D-99423 Weimar, Germany..
    Broeker, Thomas
    Nuremberg Inst Technol, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Lim, Theodore
    Heriot Watt Univ, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Luccini, Angelo Marco
    Succubus Interact, Nantes, France..
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Current Competencies of Game Facilitators and Their Potential Optimization in Higher Education: Multimethod Study2021In: JMIR Serious Games, E-ISSN 2291-9279, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e25481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Serious games can be a powerful learning tool in higher education. However, the literature indicates that the learning outcome in a serious game depends on the facilitators' competencies. Although professional facilitators in commercial game-based training have undergone specific instruction, facilitators in higher education cannot rely on such formal instruction, as game facilitation is only an occasional part of their teaching activities. Objective: This study aimed to address the actual competencies of occasional game facilitators and their perceived competency deficits. Methods: Having many years of experience as professional and occasional facilitators, we (n=7) defined requirements for the occasional game facilitator using individual reflection and focus discussion. Based on these results, guided interviews were conducted with additional occasional game facilitators (n=4) to check and extend the requirements. Finally, a group of occasional game facilitators (n=30) answered an online questionnaire based on the results of the requirement analysis and existing competency models. Results: Our review produced the following questions: Which competencies are needed by facilitators and what are their training needs? What do current training courses for occasional game facilitators in higher education look like? How do the competencies of occasional game facilitators differ from other competencies required in higher education? The key findings of our analysis are that a mix of managerial and technical competencies is required for facilitating serious games in higher educational contexts. Further, there is a limited or no general competence model for game facilitators, and casual game facilitators rarely undergo any specific, formal training. Conclusions: The results identified the competencies that game facilitators require and a demand for specific formal training. Thus, the study contributes to the further development of a competency model for game facilitators and enhances the efficiency of serious games.

  • 3.
    Hellstrand, Mikaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Tensions between real-world practices and the digitalization paradigm for data-driven services in eldercare: observations from an ethnographic study in Sweden2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The implementation of a data-driven approach within the health care system happens in a rapid pace; including in the eldercare sector. Within Swedish eldercare, data-driven health approach is not yet widely implemented. In the specific context of long-term care for older adults, quality of care is as much determined by how social care is being performed as it is by what kind medical care that is provided. In particular, relational aspects have been proven to have a crucial influence on the experience of quality of care for the actors involved. Drawing on ethnographic material collected at a Swedish nursing home, this paper explores in what way the relational aspects of care could potentially become affected by the increased use of a data-driven health approach. Methods: An ethnographic approach was adopted in order to investigate the daily care work at a long-term care facility as it unfolded. Fieldwork was conducted at a somatic ward in a Swedish long-term care facility over 4 months (86 h in total), utilizing the methods of participant observation, informal interviews and document analysis. The material was analyzed iteratively throughout the entire research process adopting thematic analysis. Results: Viewing our ethnographic material through an observational lense problematising the policy discourse around data-driven health approach, two propositions were developed. First, we propose that relational knowledge risk becoming less influential in shaping everyday care, when moving to a data-driven health approach. Second, we propose that quality of care risk becoming more directed on quality of medical care at the expense of quality of life. Conclusion: While the implementation of data-driven health approach within long-term care for older adults is not yet widespread, the general development within health care points towards a situation in which this will become reality. Our study highlights the importance of taking the relational aspects of care into consideration, both during the planning and implementation phase of this process. By doing this, the introduction of a data-driven health approach could serve to heighten the quality of care in a way which supports both quality of medical care and quality of life.

  • 4.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Assessment of Application of Participatory Methods for Complex Adaptive Systems  in the Public Sector2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The provision of services by the public sector is the result of a complex adaptive system at work, and involves a large number of stakeholders from different institutions and organisations. In the era of rapid change in requirements and expectations from the public sector, the management of change processes asks for the involvement of many stakeholders from different layers and positions.

    Participatory methods provide the ability to involve a wide range of stakeholders, but despite their case-wise documented successes, and well described application in involving citizens in governmental decision-making, very little evidence exists of their role when engaging professionals.

    This study assesses the application of participatory methods as an approach to support change processes in the public sector from a complex adaptive system perspective. The purpose of this two-phase exploratory sequential mixed method study with descriptive parts is to first qualitatively explore which needs for change in the public sector could benefit from participatory methods, and then to apply participatory methods for six experiments to assess how effective such methods are to support change processes of complex adaptive systems in the public sector.

    Four methods have been included: participatory simulation, gamification, Q methodology and participatory model building. Each of the cases has been scored on a set of frameworks. The cases have been obtained from the fields of road networks, transit and healthcare.

    Analysis across the experiment found several trends. Firstly, experiments at the field-level, where expertise and knowledge outside one organisation are required, showed stronger democratisation and focus on mapping out diversity compared to other levels. Similarly, experiments at the sub-system level are more likely to be focused on reaching consensus and using participants for advising. Secondly, a pattern has been found between higher participatory level of a method, a higher degree of power-sharing between the participants, and better results of an assessment.  A correlation was observed between overall assessment and other parameters of applications: communication efficiency, knowledge between causes and effects, and direction from leadership.

    The recognition that the public sector is a complex adaptive system proved to be more present in the service-oriented fields than in the infrastructure fields. Larger-scale issues at the organisation-level or even field-level proved to be more complex than issues at the subsystem level.

    Participatory methods proved to be effective for providing a grip on issues of a complex nature. Particular strengths were the ability to provide for open structures for thinking outside the box, and the use for identification of bottlenecks and constraints in systems. The ability to identify differences in stakeholder perspectives proves valuable, and can be gathered from a wide range of sources in and around a participatory setting.

    However, successful participatory methods need high communication efficiency, use retroactive evaluation and need to be done based on high stakeholder collaboration. These costs can outweigh all benefits if the problem is not complex or preparation has not been appropriately performed. Access to the right people, support from the organisation and motivated participants, as well as the right choice for the level of participation proved crucial for its success.

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    Assessment of Application of Participatory Methods for Complex Adaptive Systems in the Public Sector
  • 5.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Ind Engn & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamification of a Procurement Process for Professional Training of Public Servants2019In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation and training about changes in a procurement process are complex due to the complexity of the procurement process characterised by the adaptive stakeholder network and continuously changing market rules. Traditional training approaches for procurement split the process into separate steps; however, to be able to assess all training aspects, it is important to have a holistic look at procurement. This work explores how well gamification can address the complexity of the procurement process for training specialists in the road construction sector. A case study is carried out to train new business models for both experienced specialists and new employees. The steps for the development of gamification for training in procurement are shown. A comparison of results from experienced and less experienced participants is presented. The results show the relationships amongst the complexity of the real system, the gamification design and the results of gamification.

  • 6.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamifying Project Procurement to Incorporate Better Goals of Organizations in the Public Sector: A participatory simulation approach on a Swedish road construction use case2019In: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governmental institutions need to ensure work of infrastructures, and in most cases, it is done using project procurement process. Such processes have highly complex and dynamic interaction. It leads to issues, such as information asymmetry, over-specified tenders, not efficient feedback loops, etc. As result, projects can rarely match objectives of organizations. This paper explores the use of participatory simulation to help holistically investigate a project procurement process. Based on case studies from the Swedish road construction field, it can be concluded, that a participatory simulation is an effective approach to experiment with the effects of project procurement.

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    Gamifying Project Procurement
  • 7.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulation Validation: Matching Participants’ Worldviews with Their Decisions2019In: ISAGA 2018, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation is a successful approach to many issues where a holistic view is important. However, to use results from gaming simulations, the game has to be validated. This paper proposes a two-step approach for process validation of behavior for the gaming simulation by comparing decisions that players make in a game with the perceptions that affect their real-life decisions. Two case studies, where this approach was applied, are presented and the results are analyzed and discussed. A strong correlation between behavior during the games and in the real world was observed. This correlation indicates that gaming simulations in these cases are validated and represent the real system in an accu-rate manner. Thus, these cases show that the proposed approach works and can be used for validation of gaming simulations.

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    Gaming Simulation Validation
  • 8.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Hauge, Jannicke Baalsrud
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Perceptions of stakeholders in project procurement for road construction2018In: Cogent Business and Management, ISSN 2331-1975, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1520447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning transport system, building, operating and maintaining public roads and railways is typically performed by public institutions in collaboration with other stakeholders, such as manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. In many cases, this collaboration is done with a procurement process. Despite the formal nature of such process, stakeholders can have different worldviews or perceptions leading to adverse effects on the final procurement result. This article is focused on how to find perceptions of stakeholders related to roadwork-related procurement processes using Q methodology. This methodology uses data from the stakeholders and searches for factors or groups within the data of participants who have similar opinions. A specific case of road procurement in Sweden is used to test the methodology. As a result, three clusters of perceptions are found. These clusters and their interpretation can be applied to many tasks that are related to complex adaptive systems such as policy-making, strategy generation, solution testing, training and others.

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  • 9.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Nicole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Using Q Methodology for Developing a System Dynamics Model: A Case Study of Modelling Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of strategic and dynamic behaviour in real-world systems is paramount, especially when we consider the large technical infrastructures that make society work. Modelling social aspects are complicated because they are usually not well defined and can highly depend on individuals. This paper proposes and describes a framework on how to combine system dynamics and Q methodology to better understand complex systems. The proposed framework is the tool to work with systems where connections can be explained only by subjective opinions, and it gives opportunities to simulate sociotechnical systems, where social behaviour cannot be described with observation data.

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    fulltext
  • 10.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A Research Agenda for Green Procurement of Infrastructures2014In: 2014 International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation: Engineering Responsible Innovation in Products and Services, ICE 2014, IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 6871604-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Construction and maintenance of road infrastructure is a major source of emissions and energy usage. Procuring green roads, however, is neither commonplace nor trivial to implement. New ways to enhance the green procurement of roads are therefore needed, and can potentially involve life cycle assessment and green labelling methods. Considering the complexity of the pavement industry sector with its many actors and structures, implementing such innovations in the procurement process is surrounded with a series of uncertainties. The current paper formulates a research agenda for green procurement of roads by looking into potential mechanisms for future procurement. Given the objective of green procurement, the paper is focusing on the question what are the short term and long term effects of potential combinations of life cycle assessment principles and procurement process structures on infrastructure costs, risks, environmental impact and the structure of the road sector. Six different approaches are presented and reviewed for relevant earlier work in the literature. Based upon the complexities found, the authors discuss the challenges in finding a matching single research method. A solution is proposed for a holistic approach using gaming simulation, since it allows evaluating the procurement of infrastructure as a complex adaptive system.

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Developing a System Dynamics Model from Perceptions: A Case Study of Perspectives on Road Procurement in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a public organisation, road administrations have the responsibility to improve the road construction process. However, the changes in such process involve a number of the stakeholders, who have different perceptions about what is most important in the road construction process. Perspectives on the necessity and nature of change will differ too. In order to provide an environment in which the potential consequences of changes in procurement can be tested, it is important to develop a model that simulates the process, especially the social part of the system. To achieve this, the model requires perceptions of stakeholders. The paper presents a new framework that obtains worldviews of the stakeholders in the complex adaptive system and transforms them into a System Dynamics model. As a result, a computational model is developed to observe the behaviour of stakeholders in the system. The model can become a tool for testing policies in the complex adaptive system.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Logistics and Informatics in Health Care.
    Kringos, Niki
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Perspectives of Stakeholders on Road Procurements: In search of Procurement Aspects using Q Methodology2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays much emphasis is given to innovative procurement in the road construction sector. However, typical discussions about it do not focus on all the stakeholders involved in the process and all aspects. However, one cannot forget that procurement is a complex system, and everyone’s perspective is important for success. This paper looks at the worldviews of stakeholders in the road construction industry. The Q methodology is used to analyse the subjectivity of the worldviews. As a result, it is possible to look deeper into the perspectives and to see what each stakeholder sees as most important, and also to compare different worldviews among stakeholders.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Krishna, Harsha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Orhan, Ibrahim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Framework for Using Professional Engineering Tools to Develop Games in Post-Secondary Education2023In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 39-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching is changing with increasing emphasis on teaching digitally to enable remote learning. While it gives more opportunities to engage students, it also makes it harder to learn professional skills, which is especially important for the engineering field. One problem might be the lack of professional tools for the digital education of engineers. The purpose of this work is to assess the feasibility of creating digital educational games by shaping professional tools themselves as games for post-secondary education, and to develop a framework for such a process. This article demonstrates a case for applying the proposed framework to develop a game for a communication network course using a computer network simulator. The findings of this work highlight the need to create such games in higher education based on professional tools.

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  • 14.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Lindencrona, Fredrik
    SKL.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A System of Systems of Mental Health in Cities: Digging Deep into the Origins of Complexity2020In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, ISSN 0894-587X, E-ISSN 1573-3289, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 961-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health in urban environments is often treated from a healthcare provision perspective. Research in recent decades showed that mental illness in cities is a result of dysfunctional coordination between different city systems and structures. Given the nature of the city as a system of systems, this work builds participatorily a general system dynamic model of factors that affect mental health in urban and regional environments. Through this method, we investigated the challenges of the application of such methodology to identify important factors, feedback loops, and dependencies between systems to move forward in planning for mental health in cities. The outcome is a general model that showed the importance of factors that vary from individuals, families to communities and feedback loops that span multiple systems such as the city physical infrastructures, social environments, schools, labor market, and healthcare provision.

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    A system of systems of MH
  • 15.
    Moustaid, Elhabib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Sensitivity Analysis of policy options for urban mental health using system dynamics and fuzzy cognitive maps2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 Winter Simulation Conference / [ed] N. Mustafee, K.-H.G. Bae, S. Lazarova-Molnar, M. Rabe, C. Szabo, P. Haas, and Y.-J. Son, eds., 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban mental health challenges call for new ways of designing policies to address the ongoing mental health issues in cities. Policymaking for mental health in cities is extremely difficult due to the complex nature of mental health, the structure of cities, and their multiple subsystems. This paper presents a general system dynamic model of factors affecting mental health and a method to test the sensitivity of the model to policy options using an approach combining system dynamics and fuzzy cognitive maps. The method is developed and tested to evaluate policies built around feedback loops. The approach succeeded in identifying the factors that substantially improve the mental health of the city population for specific contexts. It also suggests the coordination needed between different subsystems to reach these objectives.

  • 16.
    Shreenath, Vinutha Magal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    A Feasibility Study for Gamification in Transport Maintenance: Requirements to implement gamification in heterogeneous organizations2015In: Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications (VS-Games), 2015 7th International Conference on, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamification has been successfully applied in many domains, but mostly for simple, isolated and operational tasks. The hope for gamification as a method to radically change and improve behavior, to provide incentives for sustained engagement has proven to be more difficult to get right. Applying gamification in large networked organizations with heterogeneous tasks remains a challenge. Applying gamification in such enterprise environments posits different requirements, and a match between these requirements and the institution needs to be investigated before venturing into the design and implementation of gamification. The current paper contributes a study where the authors investigate the feasibility of implementing gamification in Trafikverket, the Swedish transport administration. Through an investigation of the institutional arrangements around data collection, procurement processes and links to institutional structures, the study finds areas within Trafikverket where gamification could be successfully applied, and suggests gaps and methods to apply gamification in other areas.

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    fulltext
  • 17.
    Terio, Minna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels 23,B4, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Perez-Rodriguez, Rodrigo
    Getafe Univ Hosp, Biomed Res Fdn, Getafe, Spain..
    Guevara, Tania Guevara
    Getafe Univ Hosp, Geriatr Serv, Getafe, Spain..
    Valdes-Aragones, Myriam
    Getafe Univ Hosp, Geriatr Serv, Getafe, Spain..
    Kornevs, Maksims
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Bjalevik-Chronan, Sanna
    Unit Dev Social Care Elderly, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Taloyan, Marina
    Karolinska Inst, Acad Primary Healthcare Ctr, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Stockholm, Region Stockhol, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Guidetti, Susanne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Alfred Nobels 23,B4, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Med Unit Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Theme Womens Hlth & Allied Hlth Professionals, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Preventing frailty with the support of a home-monitoring and communication platform among older adults-a study protocol for a randomised-controlled pilot study in Sweden2022In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, E-ISSN 2055-5784, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: POSITIVE (i.e. maintaining and imPrOving the intrinSIc capaciTy Involving primary care and caregiVErs) is a new intervention program consisting of home-monitoring equipment and a communication platform to support treatment of frailty symptoms initially in primary care and prevent disability in older adults. Methods: The primary objectives are to estimate the potential efficacy of the POSITIVE system on improving frailty in at least one point in Fried's criteria and five points in Frailty Trait Scale. The secondary objectives are to (A) assess the recruitment, retention, drop-out rates, compliance with the intervention and the intervention mechanisms of impact; (B) evaluate the usability and acceptance of the POSITIVE system, and to get estimations on; (C) the potential efficacy of the intervention on improving the participants' physical performance, cognitive functions, mood, independency level in activities in daily living, the impact on quality of life and number of falls during the follow-up period; (D) the impact on the caregiver quality of life and caregiver burden; and (E) on the consumption of health care resources, participants' perception of health and level of care received, and healthcare professionals' workload and satisfaction. A randomised controlled, assessor-blinded pilot study design recruiting from a primary care centre in Stockholm Region will be conducted. Fifty older adults identified as pre-frail or frail will be randomised into a control or an intervention group. Both groups will receive a medical review, nutritional recommendations and Vivifrail physical exercise program. The intervention group will receive the POSITIVE-system including a tablet, the POSITIVE application and portable measurement devices. The participants receiving the POSITIVE program will be monitored remotely by a primary care nurse during a 6-month follow-up. Data will be collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months into the intervention though the platform, standardised assessments and surveys. A process evaluation as per Medical Research Council guidance will be conducted after the 6-month follow-up period. Discussion:The implications of the study are to provide estimations on the potential efficacy of the POSITIVE system in improving frailty among older adults and to provide relevant data to inform powered studies of potential efficacy and effectiveness, as well as to inform about the feasibility of the current study design.

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