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  • 1. Ahmadinejad, F.
    et al.
    Møller, S. G.
    Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, M.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jami, M. -S
    Molecular mechanisms behind free radical scavengers function against oxidative stress2017In: Antioxidants, ISSN 2076-3921, Vol. 6, no 3, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulating evidence shows that oxidative stress is involved in a wide variety of human diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, cancers, etc. Here, we discuss the significance of oxidative conditions in different disease, with the focus on neurodegenerative disease including Parkinsons disease, which is mainly caused by oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively), collectively known as RONS, are produced by cellular enzymes such as myeloperoxidase, NADPH-oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Natural antioxidant systems are categorized into enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant groups. The former includes a number of enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase, while the latter contains a number of antioxidants acquired from dietary sources including vitamin C, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols. There are also scavengers used for therapeutic purposes, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) used routinely in the treatment of Parkinsons disease (not as a free radical scavenger), and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (Edaravone) that acts as a free radical detoxifier frequently used in acute ischemic stroke. The cell surviving properties of L-DOPA and Edaravone against oxidative stress conditions rely on the alteration of a number of stress proteins such as Annexin A1, Peroxiredoxin-6 and PARK7/DJ-1 (Parkinson disease protein 7, also known as Protein deglycase DJ-1). Although they share the targets in reversing the cytotoxic effects of H2O2, they seem to have distinct mechanism of function. Exposure to L-DOPA may result in hypoxia condition and further induction of ORP150 (150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein) with its concomitant cytoprotective effects but Edaravone seems to protect cells via direct induction of Peroxiredoxin-2 and inhibition of apoptosis.

  • 2.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Royal Institute of Technology, KTH.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mukhopadhyay, Bani
    Klevstig, Martina
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cinar, Resat
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Kunos, George
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Characterization of heterogeneous redox responses in hepatocellular carcinoma patients using network analysis2019In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mukhopadhyay, Bani
    NIAAA, Lab Physiol Studies, NIH, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Klevstig, Martina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cinar, Resat
    NIAAA, Lab Physiol Studies, NIH, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Nielsen, Jens
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Boren, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kunos, George
    NIAAA, Lab Physiol Studies, NIH, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, SE-17121 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Characterization of heterogeneous redox responses in hepatocellular carcinoma patients using network analysis2019In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 40, p. 471-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Redox metabolism is often considered a potential target for cancer treatment, but a systematic examination of redox responses in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is missing. Methods: Here, we employed systems biology and biological network analyses to reveal key roles of genes associated with redox metabolism in HCC by integrating multi-omics data. Findings: We found that several redox genes, including 25 novel potential prognostic genes, are significantly co-expressed with liver-specific genes and genes associated with immunity and inflammation. Based on an integrative analysis, we found that HCC tumors display antagonistic behaviors in redox responses. The two HCC groups are associated with altered fatty acid, amino acid, drug and hormone metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and NADPH-independent vs - dependent antioxidant defenses. Redox behavior varies with known tumor subtypes and progression, affecting patient survival. These antagonistic responses are also displayed at the protein and metabolite level and were validated in several independent cohorts. We finally showed the differential redox behavior using mice transcriptomics in HCC and noncancerous tissues and associated with hypoxic features of the two redox gene groups. Interpretation: Our integrative approaches highlighted mechanistic differences among tumors and allowed the identification of a survival signature and several potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCC. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Elmas, Ezgi
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kararoudi, Meisam Naeimi
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Metabolic Network-Based Identification and Prioritization o f Anticancer Targets Based on Expression Data in Hepatocellular Carcinoma2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly form of liver cancer with high mortality worldwide. Unfortunately, the large heterogeneity of this disease makes it difficult to develop effective treatment strategies. Cellular network analyses have been employed to study heterogeneity in cancer, and to identify potential therapeutic targets. However, the existing approaches do not consider metabolic growth requirements, i.e., biological network functionality, to rank candidate targets while preventing toxicity to non-cancerous tissues. Here, we developed an algorithm to overcome these issues based on integration of gene expression data, genome-scale metabolic models, network controllability, and dispensability, as well as toxicity analysis. This method thus predicts and ranks potential anticancer non-toxic controlling metabolite and gene targets. Our algorithm encompasses both objective-driven and-independent tasks, and uses network topology to finally rank the predicted therapeutic targets. We employed this algorithm to the analysis of transcriptomic data for 50 HCC patients with both cancerous and non-cancerous samples. We identified several potential targets that would prevent cell growth, including 74 anticancer metabolites, and 3 gene targets (PRKACA, PGS1, and CRLS1). The predicted anticancer metabolites showed good agreement with existing FDA-approved cancer drugs, and the 3 genes were experimentally validated by performing experiments in HepG2 and Hep3B liver cancer cell lines. Our observations indicate that our novel approach successfully identifies therapeutic targets for effective treatment of cancer. This approach may also be applied to any cancer type that has tumor and non-tumor gene or protein expression data.

  • 5.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klevstig, Martina
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Metabolic network-based stratification of hepatocellular carcinoma reveals three distinct tumor subtypes2018In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent forms of liver cancer, and effective treatment methods are limited due to tumor heterogeneity. There is a great need for comprehensive approaches to stratify HCC patients, gain biological insights into subtypes, and ultimately identify effective therapeutic targets. We stratified HCC patients and characterized each subtype using transcriptomics data, genome-scale metabolic networks and network topology/controllability analysis. This comprehensive systems-level analysis identified three distinct subtypes with substantial differences in metabolic and signaling pathways reflecting at genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels. These subtypes showed large differences in clinical survival associated with altered kynurenine metabolism, WNT/beta-catenin-associated lipid metabolism, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Integrative analyses indicated that the three subtypes rely on alternative enzymes (e.g., ACSS1/ACSS2/ACSS3, PKM/PKLR, ALDOB/ALDOA, MTHFD1L/MTHFD2/MTHFD1) to catalyze the same reactions. Based on systems-level analysis, we identified 8 to 28 subtype-specific genes with pivotal roles in controlling the metabolic network and predicted that these genes may be targeted for development of treatment strategies for HCC subtypes by performing in silico analysis. To validate our predictions, we performed experiments using HepG2 cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and observed opposite expression patterns between genes expressed in high/moderate/low-survival tumor groups in response to hypoxia, reflecting activated hypoxic behavior in patients with poor survival. In conclusion, our analyses showed that the heterogeneous HCC tumors can be stratified using a metabolic network-driven approach, which may also be applied to other cancer types, and this stratification may have clinical implications to drive the development of precision medicine.

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  • 6.
    Lee, Sunjae
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Liu, Zhengtao
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Deshmukh, Sumit
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shobky, Mohamed AI
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lovric, Alen
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    TCSBN: a database of tissue and cancer specific biological networks2017In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 46, no D1, p. D595-D600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological networks provide new opportunities for understanding the cellular biology in both health and disease states. We generated tissue specific integrated networks (INs) for liver, muscle and adipose tissues by integratingmetabolic, regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks. We also generated human co-expression networks (CNs) for 46 normal tissues and 17 cancers to explore the functional relationships between genes as well as their relationships with biological functions, and investigate the overlap between functional and physical interactions provided by CNs and INs, respectively. These networks can be employed in the analysis of omics data, provide detailed insight into disease mechanisms by identifying the key biological components and eventually can be used in the development of efficient treatment strategies. Moreover, comparative analysis of the networks may allow for the identification of tissue-specific targets that can be used in the development of drugs with the minimum toxic effect to other human tissues. These context-specific INs and CNs are presented in an interactive website http://inetmodels.com without any limitation.

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  • 7.
    Rosario, Dorines
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shoaie, Saeed
    Kings Coll London, Ctr Host Microbiome Interact, Dent Inst, London, England.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Translat Microbiome Res, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Understanding the Representative Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Metformin-Treated Type 2 Diabetes Patients Using Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysbiosis in the gut microbiome composition may be promoted by therapeutic drugs such as metformin, the world's most prescribed antidiabetic drug. Under metformin treatment, disturbances of the intestinal microbes lead to increased abundance of Escherichia spp., Akkermansia muciniphila, Subdoligranulum variabile and decreased abundance of Intestinibacter bartlettii. This alteration may potentially lead to adverse effects on the host metabolism, with the depletion of butyrate producer genus. However, an increased production of butyrate and propionate was verified in metformin-treated Type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. The mechanisms underlying these nutritional alterations and their relation with gut microbiota dysbiosis remain unclear. Here, we used Genomescale Metabolic Models of the representative gut bacteria Escherichia spp., I. bartlettii, A. muciniphila, and S. variabile to elucidate their bacterial metabolism and its effect on intestinal nutrient pool, including macronutrients (e.g., amino acids and short chain fatty acids), minerals and chemical elements (e.g., iron and oxygen). We applied flux balance analysis (FBA) coupled with synthetic lethality analysis interactions to identify combinations of reactions and extracellular nutrients whose absence prevents growth. Our analyses suggest that Escherichia sp. is the bacteria least vulnerable to nutrient availability. We have also examined bacterial contribution to extracellular nutrients including short chain fatty acids, amino acids, and gasses. For instance, Escherichia sp. and S. variabile may contribute to the production of important short chain fatty acids (e.g., acetate and butyrate, respectively) involved in the host physiology under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We have also identified pathway susceptibility to nutrient availability and reaction changes among the four bacteria using both FBA and flux variability analysis. For instance, lipopolysaccharide synthesis, nucleotide sugar metabolism, and amino acid metabolism are pathways susceptible to changes in Escherichia sp. and A. muciniphila. Our observations highlight important commensal and competing behavior, and their association with cellular metabolism for prevalent gut microbes. The results of our analysis have potential important implications for development of new therapeutic approaches in T2D patients through the development of prebiotics, probiotics, or postbiotics.

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  • 8.
    Rouhimoghadam, Milad
    et al.
    Univ Tehran, Sch Biol, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Coll Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Safarian, Shahrokh
    Univ Tehran, Sch Biol, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Coll Sci, Tehran, Iran..
    Carroll, Jason S.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Cambridge, England..
    Sheibani, Nader
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Ophthalmol & Visual Sci, Biomed Engn & Cell & Regenerat Biol, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Madison, WI USA..
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tamoxifen-Induced Apoptosis of MCF-7 Cells via GPR30/PI3K/MAPKs Interactions: Verification by ODE Modeling and RNA Sequencing2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) is one of the most widely used and effective therapeutic agent for breast cancer. It benefits nearly 75% of patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer that receive this drug. Its effectiveness is mainly attributed to its capacity to function as an ER antagonist, blocking estrogen binding sites on the receptor, and inhibiting the proliferative action of the receptor-hormone complex. Although, tamoxifen can induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells via upregulation of pro-apoptotic factors, it can also promote uterine hyperplasia in some women. Thus, tamoxifen as a multifunctional drug could have different effects on cells based on the utilization of effective concentrations or availability of specific co-factors. Evidence that tamoxifen functions as a GPR30 (G-Protein Coupled Receptor 30) agonist activating adenylyl cyclase and EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) intracellular signaling networks, provides yet another means of explaining the multi-functionality of tamoxifen. Here ordinary differential equation (ODE) modeling, RNA sequencing and real time qPCR analysis were utilized to establish the necessary data for gene network mapping of tamoxifen-stimulated MCF7 cells, which express the endogenous ER and GPR30. The gene set enrichment analysis and pathway analysis approaches were used to categorize transcriptionally upregulated genes in biological processes. Of the 2,713 genes that were significantly upregulated following a 48 h incubation with 250 mu M tamoxifen, most were categorized as either growth-related or pro-apoptotic intermediates that fit into the Tp53 and/or MAPK signaling pathways. Collectively, our results display that the effects of tamoxifen on the breast cancer MCF-7 cell line are mediated by the activation of important signaling pathways including Tp53 and MAPKs to induce apoptosis.

  • 9.
    Turanli, Beste
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Karagoz, Kubra
    Rutgers Canc Inst New Jersey, Dept Radiat Oncol, New Brunswick, NJ USA..
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sinha, Raghu
    Penn State Coll Med, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, Hershey, PA 17033 USA..
    Gatza, Michael L.
    Rutgers Canc Inst New Jersey, Dept Radiat Oncol, New Brunswick, NJ USA..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arga, Kazim Yalcin
    Marmara Univ, Dept Bioengn, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Multi-Omic Data Interpretation to Repurpose Subtype Specific Drug Candidates for Breast Cancer2019In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 10, article id 420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is largely synonymous with the basal-like molecular subtype, is the 5th leading cause of cancer deaths for women in the United States. The overall prognosis for TNBC patients remains poor given that few treatment options exist; including targeted therapies (not FDA approved), and multi-agent chemotherapy as standard-of-care treatment. TNBC like other complex diseases is governed by the perturbations of the complex interaction networks thereby elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms of this disease in the context of network principles, which have the potential to identify targets for drug development. Here, we present an integrated "omics" approach based on the use of transcriptome and interactome data to identify dynamic/active protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs) in TNBC patients. We have identified three highly connected modules, EED, DHX9, and AURKA, which are extremely activated in TNBC tumors compared to both normal tissues and other breast cancer subtypes. Based on the functional analyses, we propose that these modules are potential drivers of proliferation and, as such, should be considered candidate molecular targets for drug development or drug repositioning in TNBC. Consistent with this argument, we repurposed steroids, anti-inflammatory agents, anti-infective agents, cardiovascular agents for patients with basal-like breast cancer. Finally, we have performed essential metabolite analysis on personalized genome-scale metabolic models and found that metabolites such as sphingosine-1-phosphate and cholesterol-sulfate have utmost importance in TNBC tumor growth.

  • 10.
    Zamani, Leila
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Lundqvist, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO.
    Zhang, Ye
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Center for Protein Research.
    Aberg, Magnus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Analyt Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Lindahl, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Solna, Sweden..
    Mie, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, S-11883 Solna, Sweden..
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Field, Raymond
    MedImmune, Biopharmaceut Dev, Cambridge CB21 6GH, England..
    Turner, Richard
    MedImmune, Biopharmaceut Dev, Cambridge CB21 6GH, England..
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO.
    Chotteau, Véronique
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Centre for Advanced BioProduction by Continuous Processing, AdBIOPRO.
    High Cell Density Perfusion Culture has a Maintained Exoproteome and Metabolome2018In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, E-ISSN 1860-7314, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1800036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optimization of bioprocesses for biopharmaceutical manufacturing by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells can be a challenging endeavor and, today, heavily relies on empirical methods treating the bioreactor process and the cells as black boxes. Multi-omics approaches have the potential to reveal otherwise unknown characteristics of these systems and identify culture parameters to more rationally optimize the cultivation process. Here, the authors have applied both metabolomic and proteomic profiling to a perfusion process, using CHO cells for antibody production, to explore how cell biology and reactor environment change as the cell density reaches 200x10(6)cellsmL(-1). The extracellular metabolic composition obtained in perfusion mode shows a markedly more stable profile in comparison to fed-batch, despite a far larger range of viable cell densities in perfusion. This stable profile is confirmed in the extracellular proteosome. Furthermore, the proteomics data shows an increase of structural proteins as cell density increases, which could be due to a higher shear stress and explain the decrease in cell diameter at very high cell densities. Both proteomic and metabolic results shows signs of oxidative stress and changes in glutathione metabolism at very high cell densities. The authors suggest the methodology presented herein to be a powerful tool for optimizing processes of recombinant protein production.

  • 11.
    Zhang, Cheng
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bidkhori, Gholamreza
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lee, Sunjae
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arif, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    ESS: A Tool for Genome-Scale Quantification of Essentiality Score for Reaction/Genes in Constraint-Based Modeling2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are comprehensive descriptions of cell metabolism and have been extensively used to understand biological responses in health and disease. One such application is in determining metabolic adaptation to the absence of a gene or reaction, i.e., essentiality analysis. However, current methods do not permit efficiently and accurately quantifying reaction/gene essentiality. Here, we present Essentiality Score Simulator (ESS), a tool for quantification of gene/reaction essentialities in GEMs. ESS quantifies and scores essentiality of each reaction/gene and their combinations based on the stoichiometric balance using synthetic lethal analysis. This method provides an option to weight metabolic models which currently rely mostly on topologic parameters, and is potentially useful to investigate the metabolic pathway differences between different organisms, cells, tissues, and/or diseases. We benchmarked the proposed method against multiple network topology parameters, and observed that our method displayed higher accuracy based on experimental evidence. In addition, we demonstrated its application in the wild-type and ldh knock-out E. coli core model, as well as two human cell lines, and revealed the changes of essentiality in metabolic pathways based on the reactions essentiality score. ESS is available without any limitation at https://sourceforge.net/projects/essentiality-score-simulator.

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