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  • 1.
    Antonova, Rika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Kokic, Mia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Global Search with Bernoulli Alternation Kernel for Task-oriented Grasping Informed by Simulation2018In: Proceedings of The 2nd Conference on Robot Learning, PMLR 87, 2018, p. 641-650Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop an approach that benefits from large simulated datasets and takes full advantage of the limited online data that is most relevant. We propose a variant of Bayesian optimization that alternates between using informed and uninformed kernels. With this Bernoulli Alternation Kernel we ensure that discrepancies between simulation and reality do not hinder adapting robot control policies online. The proposed approach is applied to a challenging real-world problem of task-oriented grasping with novel objects. Our further contribution is a neural network architecture and training pipeline that use experience from grasping objects in simulation to learn grasp stability scores. We learn task scores from a labeled dataset with a convolutional network, which is used to construct an informed kernel for our variant of Bayesian optimization. Experiments on an ABB Yumi robot with real sensor data demonstrate success of our approach, despite the challenge of fulfilling task requirements and high uncertainty over physical properties of objects.

  • 2.
    Arnekvist, Isac
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. Center for Applied Autonomous Sensor Systems, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vpe: Variational policy embedding for transfer reinforcement learning2019In: 2019 International Conference on Robotics And Automation (ICRA), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reinforcement Learning methods are capable of solving complex problems, but resulting policies might perform poorly in environments that are even slightly different. In robotics especially, training and deployment conditions often vary and data collection is expensive, making retraining undesirable. Simulation training allows for feasible training times, but on the other hand suffer from a reality-gap when applied in real-world settings. This raises the need of efficient adaptation of policies acting in new environments. We consider the problem of transferring knowledge within a family of similar Markov decision processes. We assume that Q-functions are generated by some low-dimensional latent variable. Given such a Q-function, we can find a master policy that can adapt given different values of this latent variable. Our method learns both the generative mapping and an approximate posterior of the latent variables, enabling identification of policies for new tasks by searching only in the latent space, rather than the space of all policies. The low-dimensional space, and master policy found by our method enables policies to quickly adapt to new environments. We demonstrate the method on both a pendulum swing-up task in simulation, and for simulation-to-real transfer on a pushing task.

  • 3.
    Hang, Kaiyu
    et al.
    Yale Univ, Dept Mech Engn & Mat Sci, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Lyu, Ximin
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Song, Haoran
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL. Örebro Univ, Ctr Appl Autonomous Sensor Syst AASS, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dollar, Aaron M.
    Yale Univ, Dept Mech Engn & Mat Sci, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Zhang, Fu
    Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Perching and resting-A paradigm for UAV maneuvering with modularized landing gears2019In: SCIENCE ROBOTICS, ISSN 2470-9476, Vol. 4, no 28, article id eaau6637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perching helps small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) extend their time of operation by saving battery power. However, most strategies for UAV perching require complex maneuvering and rely on specific structures, such as rough walls for attaching or tree branches for grasping. Many strategies to perching neglect the UAV's mission such that saving battery power interrupts the mission. We suggest enabling UAVs with the capability of making and stabilizing contacts with the environment, which will allow the UAV to consume less energy while retaining its altitude, in addition to the perching capability that has been proposed before. This new capability is termed "resting." For this, we propose a modularized and actuated landing gear framework that allows stabilizing the UAV on a wide range of different structures by perching and resting. Modularization allows our framework to adapt to specific structures for resting through rapid prototyping with additive manufacturing. Actuation allows switching between different modes of perching and resting during flight and additionally enables perching by grasping. Our results show that this framework can be used to perform UAV perching and resting on a set of common structures, such as street lights and edges or corners of buildings. We show that the design is effective in reducing power consumption, promotes increased pose stability, and preserves large vision ranges while perching or resting at heights. In addition, we discuss the potential applications facilitated by our design, as well as the potential issues to be addressed for deployment in practice.

  • 4.
    Hang, Kaiyu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Pollard, Nancy S.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    A Framework for Optimal Grasp Contact Planning2017In: IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, ISSN 2377-3766, E-ISSN 1949-3045, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 704-711Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider the problem of finding grasp contacts that are optimal under a given grasp quality function on arbitrary objects. Our approach formulates a framework for contact-level grasping as a path finding problem in the space of supercontact grasps. The initial supercontact grasp contains all grasps and in each step along a path grasps are removed. For this, we introduce and formally characterize search space structure and cost functions underwhich minimal cost paths correspond to optimal grasps. Our formulation avoids expensive exhaustive search and reduces computational cost by several orders of magnitude. We present admissible heuristic functions and exploit approximate heuristic search to further reduce the computational cost while maintaining bounded suboptimality for resulting grasps. We exemplify our formulation with point-contact grasping for which we define domain specific heuristics and demonstrate optimality and bounded suboptimality by comparing against exhaustive and uniform cost search on example objects. Furthermore, we explain how to restrict the search graph to satisfy grasp constraints for modeling hand kinematics. We also analyze our algorithm empirically in terms of created and visited search states and resultant effective branching factor.

  • 5.
    Haustein, Joshua Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Arnekvist, Isac
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Learning Manipulation States and Actions for Efficient Non-prehensile Rearrangement PlanningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses non-prehensile rearrangement planning problems where a robot is tasked to rearrange objects among obstacles on a planar surface. We present an efficient planning algorithm that is designed to impose few assumptions on the robot's non-prehensile manipulation abilities and is simple to adapt to different robot embodiments. For this, we combine sampling-based motion planning with reinforcement learning and generative modeling. Our algorithm explores the composite configuration space of objects and robot as a search over robot actions, forward simulated in a physics model. This search is guided by a generative model that provides robot states from which an object can be transported towards a desired state, and a learned policy that provides corresponding robot actions. As an efficient generative model, we apply Generative Adversarial Networks. We implement and evaluate our approach for robots endowed with configuration spaces in SE(2). We demonstrate empirically the efficacy of our algorithm design choices and observe more than 2x speedup in planning time on various test scenarios compared to a state-of-the-art approach.

  • 6.
    Haustein, Joshua Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Arnekvist, Isac
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Non-prehensile Rearrangement Planning with Learned Manipulation States and Actions2018In: Workshop on "Machine Learning in Robot Motion Planning" at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n this work we combine sampling-based motionplanning with reinforcement learning and generative modelingto solve non-prehensile rearrangement problems. Our algorithmexplores the composite configuration space of objects and robotas a search over robot actions, forward simulated in a physicsmodel. This search is guided by a generative model thatprovides robot states from which an object can be transportedtowards a desired state, and a learned policy that providescorresponding robot actions. As an efficient generative model,we apply Generative Adversarial Networks.

  • 7.
    Haustein, Joshua Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science, Yale University.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    Center for Applied Autonomous Sensor Systems (AASS), Örebro University.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Object Placement Planning and Optimization for Robot Manipulators2019In: 2019 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2019), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the problem of planning the placement of a rigid object with a dual-arm robot in a cluttered environment. In this task, we need to locate a collision-free pose for the object that a) facilitates the stable placement of the object, b) is reachable by the robot and c) optimizes a user-given placement objective. In addition, we need to select which robot arm to perform the placement with. To solve this task, we propose an anytime algorithm that integrates sampling-based motion planning with a novel hierarchical search for suitable placement poses. Our algorithm incrementally produces approach motions to stable placement poses, reaching placements with better objective as runtime progresses. We evaluate our approach for two different placement objectives, and observe its effectiveness even in challenging scenarios.

  • 8.
    Kokic, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Haustein, Joshua A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Affordance Detection for Task-Specific Grasping Using Deep Learning2017In: 2017 IEEE-RAS 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HUMANOID ROBOTICS (HUMANOIDS), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, p. 91-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we utilize the notion of affordances to model relations between task, object and a grasp to address the problem of task-specific robotic grasping. We use convolutional neural networks for encoding and detecting object affordances, class and orientation, which we utilize to formulate grasp constraints. Our approach applies to previously unseen objects from a fixed set of classes and facilitates reasoning about which tasks an object affords and how to grasp it for that task. We evaluate affordance detection on full-view and partial-view synthetic data and compute task-specific grasps for objects that belong to ten different classes and afford five different tasks. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach by employing an optimization-based grasp planner to compute task-specific grasps.

  • 9.
    Mitsioni, Ioanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Karayiannidis, Yiannis
    Division of Systems and Control, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    Center for Applied Autonomous Sensor Systems (AASS), Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Data-Driven Model Predictive Control for the Contact-Rich Task of Food Cutting2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling of contact-rich tasks is challenging and cannot be entirely solved using classical control approaches due to the difficulty of constructing an analytic description of the contact dynamics. Additionally, in a manipulation task like food-cutting, purely learning-based methods such as Reinforcement Learning, require either a vast amount of data that is expensive to collect on a real robot, or a highly realistic simulation environment, which is currently not available. This paper presents a data-driven control approach that employs a recurrent neural network to model the dynamics for a Model Predictive Controller. We build upon earlier work limited to torque-controlled robots and redefine it for velocity controlled ones. We incorporate force/torque sensor measurements, reformulate and further extend the control problem formulation. We evaluate the performance on objects used for training, as well as on unknown objects, by means of the cutting rates achieved and demonstrate that the method can efficiently treat different cases with only one dynamic model. Finally we investigate the behavior of the system during force-critical instances of cutting and illustrate its adaptive behavior in difficult cases.

  • 10. Song, Haoran
    et al.
    Haustein, Joshua Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Yuan, Weihao
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Wang, Michael Yu
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Multi-Object Rearrangement with Monte Carlo Tree Search: A Case Study on Planar Nonprehensile SortingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we address a planar non-prehensile sorting task. Here, a robot needs to push many densely packed objects belonging to different classes into a configuration where these classes are clearly separated from each other. To achieve this, we propose to employ Monte Carlo tree search equipped with a task-specific heuristic function. We evaluate the algorithm on various simulated sorting tasks and observe its effectiveness in reliably sorting up to 40 convex objects. In addition, we observe that the algorithm is capable to also sort non-convex objects, as well as convex objects in the presence of immovable obstacles.

  • 11.
    Thippur, Akshaya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Jensfelt, Patric
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Non-Parametric Spatial Context Structure Learning for Autonomous Understanding of Human Environments2017In: 2017 26TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ROBOT AND HUMAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION (RO-MAN) / [ed] Howard, A Suzuki, K Zollo, L, IEEE , 2017, p. 1317-1324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous scene understanding by object classification today, crucially depends on the accuracy of appearance based robotic perception. However, this is prone to difficulties in object detection arising from unfavourable lighting conditions and vision unfriendly object properties. In our work, we propose a spatial context based system which infers object classes utilising solely structural information captured from the scenes to aid traditional perception systems. Our system operates on novel spatial features (IFRC) that are robust to noisy object detections; It also caters to on-the-fly learned knowledge modification improving performance with practise. IFRC are aligned with human expression of 3D space, thereby facilitating easy HRI and hence simpler supervised learning. We tested our spatial context based system to successfully conclude that it can capture spatio structural information to do joint object classification to not only act as a vision aide, but sometimes even perform on par with appearance based robotic vision.

  • 12.
    Yuan, Weihao
    et al.
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Yale Univ, Dept Mech Engn & Mat Sci, New Haven, CT USA..
    Song, Haoran
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Wang, Michael Y.
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Stork, Johannes A.
    Örebro Univ, Ctr Appl Autonomous Sensor Syst, Örebro, Sweden.
    Reinforcement Learning in Topology-based Representation for Human Body Movement with Whole Arm Manipulation2019In: 2019 International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) / [ed] Howard, A Althoefer, K Arai, F Arrichiello, F Caputo, B Castellanos, J Hauser, K Isler, V Kim, J Liu, H Oh, P Santos, V Scaramuzza, D Ude, A Voyles, R Yamane, K Okamura, A, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2019, p. 2153-2160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moving a human body or a large and bulky object may require the strength of whole arm manipulation (WAM). This type of manipulation places the load on the robot's arms and relies on global properties of the interaction to succeed-rather than local contacts such as grasping or non-prehensile pushing. In this paper, we learn to generate motions that enable WAM for holding and transporting of humans in certain rescue or patient care scenarios. We model the task as a reinforcement learning problem in order to provide a robot behavior that can directly respond to external perturbation and human motion. For this, we represent global properties of the robot-human interaction with topology-based coordinates that are computed from arm and torso positions. These coordinates also allow transferring the learned policy to other body shapes and sizes. For training and evaluation, we simulate a dynamic sea rescue scenario and show in quantitative experiments that the policy can solve unseen scenarios with differently-shaped humans, floating humans, or with perception noise. Our qualitative experiments show the subsequent transporting after holding is achieved and we demonstrate that the policy can be directly transferred to a real world setting.

  • 13.
    Yuan, Weihao
    et al.
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;HKUST Robot Inst, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Stork, Johannes A.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Wang, Michael Y.
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;HKUST Robot Inst, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Dept Mech & Aerosp Engn, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Hang, Kaiyu
    Hong Kong Univ Sci & Technol, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;HKUST Robot Inst, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Dept Comp Sci & Engn, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;HKUST Inst Adv Study, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Rearrangement with Nonprehensile Manipulation Using Deep Reinforcement Learning2018In: 2018 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION (ICRA), IEEE Computer Society, 2018, p. 270-277Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rearranging objects on a tabletop surface by means of nonprehensile manipulation is a task which requires skillful interaction with the physical world. Usually, this is achieved by precisely modeling physical properties of the objects, robot, and the environment for explicit planning. In contrast, as explicitly modeling the physical environment is not always feasible and involves various uncertainties, we learn a nonprehensile rearrangement strategy with deep reinforcement learning based on only visual feedback. For this, we model the task with rewards and train a deep Q-network. Our potential field-based heuristic exploration strategy reduces the amount of collisions which lead to suboptimal outcomes and we actively balance the training set to avoid bias towards poor examples. Our training process leads to quicker learning and better performance on the task as compared to uniform exploration and standard experience replay. We demonstrate empirical evidence from simulation that our method leads to a success rate of 85%, show that our system can cope with sudden changes of the environment, and compare our performance with human level performance.

1 - 13 of 13
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