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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Meeting the future in the past-using counterfactual history to imagine computing futures2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future is inherently hard to predict, yet we know there are various factors that will limit the future of computing (scarcity of materials, energy shortages and various biophysical limits) in both substantial and disruptive ways. When we look at the past and at mainstream projected computing futures, all we see is exponential growth. While it is easy to reject such trajectories, it is much harder to imagine and propose credible, preferable and evocative alternatives. Breaking away from default modes of thinking about computing is difficult but possible, and we here present a methodology-counterfactual history-that can help us imagine alternative scenarios for computing. We argue that by learning from counterfactual pasts ("what-if scenarios"), we can more easily liberate our ideas from various preconceptions that hamper them and box them in. This makes it possible to generate and entertain a more diverse "portfolio" of ideas about the future and help us better prepare for meeting future challenges.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university2017In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the necessity of rocking the boat Computers and digitalization have greatly shaped our world and are now an unavoidable part of modern society. Weiser’s (1991) vision of ubiquitous computing has in many respects not only been met but has in affluent parts of the world been surpassed (Bell & Dourish, 2007). Digital artifacts and devices surround us and have invisibly and seamlessly permeated everything we do. Our modern societies are however not sustainable. We have overstepped several planetary boundaries and risk overstepping several more (Steffen et al., 2015). We are about to reach limits as to the resources we can extract from the earth (Bardi, 2014), and the changes wreaked are by now so profound that they will likely last for a geological period of time (Steffen et al., 2007). In light of this, it is of utmost importance to strive towards a sustainable society, and this is a responsibility that falls on many disciplines and sectors. We believe that engineering students could be key drivers in this change since many will eventually enter positions of power from which they will make decisions that will shape our future society. 

  • 3.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Systematic Review of Digital Behaviour Change Interventions for More Sustainable Food Consumption2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2638Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production and consumption present major sustainability challenges, and finding ways to reduce the environmental impact of food, for example through behavioural changes by consumers, is becoming increasingly important. In recent years, digital interventions have become important tools to change behaviours in many areas. In this review, we evaluate the status of current scientific knowledge of digital behaviour change interventions for sustainable food consumption practices. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for how to conduct systematic reviews, we searched multiple databases for papers containing terms related to food, sustainability and digital behaviour change interventions. Only studies where the digital interventions were actually implemented and evaluated from a behaviour change perspective were included, resulting in 15 primary studies in the final review. The quality of the studies was evaluated from a behaviour change perspective, and the approaches used were categorised using two intervention frameworks, the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1. The results show that all of the included studies had major quality issues when evaluated from a behaviour change perspective. This means that we could not find any evidence regarding whether the digital behaviour change interventions examined worked or not. Most studies further lacked theoretical grounding or a clear approach to how or why they should be effective for behaviour change for more sustainable food consumption practices. Our main recommendation for future research in the field is to expand from the current exploratory phase to conducting scientifically rigorous studies of higher quality, more thoroughly grounded in behaviour change theory and methods. Furthermore, based on our study, we suggest changes to the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1.

  • 4.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Tomlinson, Bill
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Informat Management, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Patterson, Donald J.
    Westmont Coll, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Santa Barbara, CA USA..
    Chen, Jay
    NYU Abu Dhabi, Dept Comp Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, Barath
    Univ Southern Calif, Comp Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, Dept Comp Engn & Comp Sci, Long Beach, CA 90840 USA..
    Computing within Limits2018In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 86-93Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPUTING RESEARCHERS AND practitioners are often seen as inventing the future. As such, we are implicitly also in the business of predicting the future. We plot trajectories for the future in the problems we select, the assumptions we make about technology and societal trends, and the ways we evaluate research. However, a great deal of computing research focuses on one particular type of future, one very much like the present, only more so. This vision of the future assumes that current trajectories of ever-increasing production and consumption will continue. This focus is perhaps not surprising, since computing machinery as we know it has existed for only 80 years, in a period of remarkable industrial and technological expansion. But humanity is rapidly approaching, or has already exceeded, a variety of planet-scale limits related to the global climate system, fossil fuels, raw materials, and biocapacity. (28,32,38) It is understandable that in computing we would not focus on limits. While planetary limits are obvious in areas such as extractive capacity in mining or fishing,

  • 5.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bates, Oliver
    Univ Lancaster, Sch Comp & Commun, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Kirman, Ben
    Univ York, Dept Theatre Film & Televis, York YO10 5GB, N Yorkshire, England..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    van den Broeck, Martijn
    Umea Univ, Umea Inst Design, Fac Sci & Technol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    The future of computing and wisdom: Insights from Human-Computer Interaction2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 113, article id UNSP 102434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a structured report on a dialogue on the Future of Computing and Wisdom. The dialogue consists of a recorded and transcribed discussion between researchers and practitioners in the field of Human-Computer Interaction that was held at workshop in conjunction with the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in September 2018. However, the dialogue also encompasses workshop participants' preparatory work with writing "fictional abstracts" - abstracts of yet-to-be-written research papers that will be published in 2068. The polyvocal dialogue that is reported upon thus includes not just the voices of researchers and practitioners who attended the workshop, but also includes the voices of the future researchers of 2068 who wrote the abstracts in question as well as the voices of the organisms, individuals, intelligent agents and communities who are the subjects, victims, beneficiaries and bystanders of wise (or unwise) future computing systems.

  • 6.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kirman, Ben
    Bates, Oliver
    The futures of computing and wisdom2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - NordiCHI ’18, ACM Press, 2018, p. 960-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in discussing the consequences of the technologies we invent and study in HCI. Whether it is climate change, ethical computing, capitalist and neo-liberal models of commerce and society, grassroots movements, big data or alternative paradigms in distributed systems, this workshop will invite participants to explore these consequences and ask how we move forward with responsibility and new forms of knowing and knowledge. We invite participants to join us, as we cast forward fifty years to 2068 to imagine the future of wisdom, and to reflect on how we got there. By writing Fictional Abstracts, an abstract from a research paper yet to be written, we will unpick critical tensions in the advancement of computing over the next decades. The workshop will develop perspectives on the futures of computing and critically reflect on the assumptions, methods, and tools for enabling (and disabling) such futures.

  • 7.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    The (Un)sustainability of Imagined Future Information Societies2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 773-785Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathway to a sustainable society is not clear, and we need to consider different developmental possibilities. This paper describes the results of a research project in the intersection of HCI and Futures Studies as well as in the intersection between "the future information society" and sustainability. We here present parts of the body of materials that were developed in a multi-year research project with the aim of describing and evaluating the sustainability impact of possible future information societies. We also discuss some of the lessons learned and what HCI and design fiction can learn from Futures Studies in general and from this project in particular. The main stakeholders in this project have been city administrators and corporate partners, and the overarching goal has primarily been to influence planning processes at the regional (Stockholm, Sweden) level.

  • 8.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Rivera, Miriam Börjesson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schmitz, Lisa
    KTH.
    Krinaki, Maria
    KTH.
    Prekratic, Nino
    KTH.
    Lundkvist, Björn
    KTH.
    Smart magic city run: Exploring the implications of public augmented reality games2018In: 9th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment, INTETAIN 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 215, p. 151-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an augmented reality smart city gaming concept, Magic Run. Magic Run has entertainment value and fulfills its’ original brief, but several aspects of the game were found to be problematic during a workshop with smart city researchers. We present problematic aspects of the game as well as ideas for how to redesign the game to control or ameliorate problematic interaction between future smart city players and bystanders.

  • 9.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Wallsten, B.
    Resource scarcity and socially just internet access over time and space2017In: LIMITS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 Workshop on Computing Within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 29-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing within Limits is concerned with "the impact of present and future ecological, material, energetic, and societal limits on computing". This paper discusses limits to computing by adopting a resource perspective on the provisioning of infrastructure for computing with a particular focus on present and future availability of material resources such as minerals and energy. While making claims about resources in general, we use copper as a specific example of coping with finiteness. The first part of the paper summarizes known facts but it is also a set-up for the latter part of the paper where we problematize the concept of "innovation" and argue that the term needs to be both refined and broadened to also take scarcity and just access to resources into account. We suggest that in a resource-constrained world and in the area of computing, a suitable goal for innovation should be to guarantee (to the largest extent possible) internet access over space and time, e.g., to the largest number of people and for the longest duration of time.

  • 10.
    Raghavan, Barath
    et al.
    ICSI, Berkeley, CA 94704 USA..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Means and Ends in Human-Computer Interaction: Sustainability through Disintermediation2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 786-796Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increased interest in broader contexts from ecology and economics within the HCI community in recent years. These developments suggest that the HCI community should engage with and respond to concerns that are external to computing yet profoundly impact human society. In this paper we observe that taking these broader contexts into account yields a fundamentally different way to think about sustainable interaction design, one in which the designer's focus must be on a) ecological limits, b) creating designs and artifacts that do not further a cornucopian paradigm, and c) fundamental human needs. It can be hard to be responsive to these contexts in practical HCI work. To address this, we propose that the design rubric of disintermediation can serve as a unifying approach for work that aims to meet the ecological and economic challenges outlined in the literature. After discussing the potential use and impact of disintermedation, we perform an analysis using this design rubric to several key application areas.

  • 11. Widdicks, K.
    et al.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Breaking the cornucopian paradigm: Towards moderate internet use in everyday life2019In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet and digital devices are increasingly embedded in our everyday lives. The hidden environmental impacts of this infrastructure are substantial and quietly growing at an increasing rate. Our collective Internet use is following a 'Cornucopian paradigm', which is unsustainable. And yet, while intentionally limiting our online connectivity might be seen negatively as a retrograde step, in this paper, we offer ways in which users might welcome attempts to moderate their Internet use through improving four aspects of our digitally-mediated lives: relationships, digital wellbeing, productivity at work, and online privacy. Given these areas, we discuss how our research agenda may realistically be facilitated and what challenges we may face in moving from the reinforcement of 'business as usual' trends. By investigating and developing user-centred, moderate Internet use, we can 'break' the Cornucopian paradigm.

1 - 11 of 11
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