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  • 1.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Ruhr University Bochum, Institute of Geography, Universitätsstr. 150, 44805 Bochum, Germany.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Albert, Christian
    Geneletti, Davide
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Greening cities through urban planning: A literature review on the uptake of concepts and methods in Stockholm2022In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, p. 127584-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature-based solutions (NBS) represent the most recent of several "greening" concepts proposed to support spatial planning and decision-making towards sustainable metropolitan regions. Despite similarities, the concepts stem from different disciplines and policy arenas and reflect various models of people-nature relations. This paper aims to analyze the uptake of greening concepts in scientific planning literature focusing on (urban) nature and landscape in the metropolitan region of Stockholm, Sweden, over the last three decades. It investigates what changes this evolution has brought in terms of the topics adopted, methods applied, and types of planning support put into practice. We identified 574 articles that reflect substantial research on greening concepts in the Swedish planning context. The articles demonstrate an initial prevalence of biodiversity with later increases of interest in ecosystem services and NBS. A detailed analysis of the studies focusing on Stockholm revealed Population growth/densification, Green space management and Biodiversity conservation as the most commonly addressed societal challenges. The most frequently mentioned type of green and blue element is Parks and (semi-)natural urban green areas, including urban forests. Methods applied were mostly quantitative, while mixes with qualitative approaches were only apparent in ecosystem services articles. Half of the studies involved practitioners or decision-makers, but only four seemed related to real-life planning processes. Taken together, the influence of scientific literature on the uptake of greening concepts in spatial planning seems to have been limited. Future mainstreaming of greening concepts in Stockholm and beyond could benefit from available data, methods and experiences, but will require more active translation and boundary management. Further research into science-policy-planning interfaces at city scale is thus imperative to advance more sustainable pathways for people and nature in metropolitan regions.

  • 2.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Analyzing Evidence of Sustainable Urban Water Management Systems: A Review through the Lenses of Sociotechnical Transitions2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 4481-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability concerns and multiple socio‐environmental pressures have necessitated a shift towards Sustainable Urban Water Management (SUWM) systems. Viewing SUWM systems as sociotechnical, this paper departs from eight factors previously identified by transition research: Pressures, Context, Purposes, Actors, Instruments, Processes, Outputs, and Outcomes as a methodological framework for a structured review of 100 articles. The study seeks to analyze empirical cases of planning and implementing SUWM systems worldwide. A wide range of public actors—driven by social and environmental factors rather than by economic pressures—have initiated SUWM projects so as to locally fulfill defined social and environmental purposes. We provide evidence on the emergence of new actors, such as experts, users, and private developers, as well as on the diverse and innovative technical and societal instruments used to promote and implement SUWM systems. We also explore their contexts and institutional capacity to deal with pressures and to mobilize significant financial and human resources, which is in itself vital for the transition to SUWM. Planned or implemented SUWM outputs are divided into green (wet ponds, raingardens, and green roofs) and gray (rain barrels and porous pavements) measures. The outcomes of SUWM projects— in terms of societal and technical learning, and their institutional uptakes—are often implicit or lacking, which seemingly reduces the rate of desirable change.

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  • 3.
    Bast, Sigvard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Högström, Johan
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Kato Huerta, Jarumi
    Pang, Xi-Lillian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Albert, Christian
    (Re)Planning of green infrastructure and nature-based solutions for sustainable urban transition2022In: Book of abstracts / [ed] Wolski, Jacek Regulska, Edyta Affek, Andrzej, 2022, p. 338-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landscape approaches are important for planning of urban sprawl in peri-urban landscapes, continuously emerging in many metropolitan regions. In the case of Stockholm Region, land-take and incremental urbanisation is a continouous process, while the regional development plan has ambitions to steer the overall development in a sustainable direction. This plan contains a green infrastructure effort building on a set of green wedges, mainly serving as support to the needs of the city and suburbs and their citizens. This initiative differ from the later green infrastructure action plan provided by the county administrative board, related to the EU biodiversity strategy and guidelines. The latter has a different approach, mainly targeting biodiversity goals as well as ecosystem services. These approaches differ from each other in several ways while both have unclear roles when it comes to municipal planning on different levels. Furthermore, the municipalities have their own initiatives when it comes to green infrastructure and nature-based solutions and it is not clear how the different planning tiers are linked to each other, to planning and management, and to multifunctional landscapes. The aim of the REPLAN project is to investigate how the different green infrastructure initiatives are linked to planning, to each other on different scales, and whether they can serve multi-functional landscapes when it comes to biodiversity and different ecosystem services. The REPLAN project involves stakeholders and practitioners on different planning levels for co-producing knowledge, methods and strategies for green infrastructure and nature-based solutions to serve as tools for sustainable transition of metropolitan areas and their peri-urban landscapes.

  • 4.
    Hale, Sarah E.
    et al.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, Ulleval Stn,POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    von der Tann, Loretta
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, Ulleval Stn,POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Rebelo, Alanna J.
    Agr Res Council, Water Sci Unit, Nat Resources & Engn, ZA-3245 Cedara, South Africa.;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag 11, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    Esler, Karen J.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag 11, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    de Lima, Ana Paula Morais
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio De Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques Sao Vicente,225 Gavea, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Rodrigues, Aline F.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio De Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques Sao Vicente,225 Gavea, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Latawiec, Agnieszka Ewa
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio De Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques Sao Vicente,225 Gavea, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Opole Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn, Ul St Stanislawa Mikolajczyka 5, PL-45271 Opole, Poland.;Univ East Anglia, Norwich Res Pk, Norwich NR4 7TJ, England..
    Ramirez-Agudelo, Nancy Andrea
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Bosch, Elisabet Roca
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Oen, Amy M. P.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, Ulleval Stn,POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Evaluating Nature-Based Solutions for Water Management in Peri-Urban Areas2023In: Water, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 893-, article id 893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term nature-based solutions (NBS) has gained traction in recent years and has been applied in many settings. There are few comprehensive assessment frameworks available that can guide NBS planning and implementation while at the same time capturing the short- and long-term impacts and benefits of the NBS. Here a recently presented framework, which builds on the theory of change and was developed to assess NBS at different phases of the project cycle, was applied to seven diverse case studies. The case studies addressed water quality and quantity issues in peri-urban areas across the global north and south. Framework indicators covering the sustainability dimensions (environmental, social and economic) were assessed at three stages of the framework: context, process and results. The work sought to investigate the following research objectives: (1) Can this framework be robust and yet flexible enough to be applied across a diverse selection of NBS projects that are at different phases of the project cycle and address different kinds of water challenges within varied ecological, social and economic contexts? (2) Is it possible to draw generalisations from a comparative analysis of the application of the framework to the case studies? Results showed that the framework was able to be applied to the case studies; however, their diversity showed that NBS projects designed in one context, for a specific purpose in a specific location, can not necessarily be transferred easily to another location. There were several process-based indicators that were universally significant for the case studies, including expertise, skills and knowledge of the involved actors, roles and responsibilities of involved actors and political support. The result-based indicators were case study-specific when environmental indicators were case study-specific, and important social indicators were environmental identity and recreational values. Overall, the use of the framework benefits the recognition of the implementation's advances, such as the change in context, the processes in place and the results obtained.

  • 5.
    Morais de Lima, Ana Paula
    et al.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Rodrigues, Aline F.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio de Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques de Sao Vicente 225, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Latawiec, Agnieszka Ewa
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Pontifical Catholic Univ Rio de Janeiro, Rio Conservat & Sustainabil Sci Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, R Marques de Sao Vicente 225, BR-22451000 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.;Agr Univ Krakow, Fac Prod & Power Engn, Dept Prod Engn Logist & Appl Comp Sci, Ul Balicka 116b, PL-30149 Krakow, Poland.;Opole Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn, Mikolajczyka 5, PL-45271 Opole, Poland..
    Dib, Viviane
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Gomes, Fernanda D.
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Maioli, Veronica
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Pena, Ingrid
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Tubenchlak, Fernanda
    Int Inst Sustainabil, R Dona Castorina 124, BR-22460320 Rio De Janeiro, Brazil..
    Rebelo, Alanna J.
    Agr Res Council, Inst Soil Climate & Water, Nat Resources & Engn, POB 8783, ZA-0001 Pretoria, South Africa.;Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag X1, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    Esler, Karen J.
    Stellenbosch Univ, Dept Conservat Ecol & Entomol, Private Bag X1, ZA-7602 Matieland, South Africa..
    Oen, Amy M. P.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Andrea Ramirez-Agudelo, Nancy
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Roca Bosch, Elisabeth
    Univ Politecn Cataluna, Inst Sustainabil Sci & Technol, Barcelona 08034, Spain..
    Singh, Nandita
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hale, Sarah E.
    Norwegian Geotech Inst NGI, POB 3930, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Framework for Planning and Evaluation of Nature-Based Solutions for Water in Peri-Urban Areas2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 13, article id 7952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent efforts to achieve social, economic, and environmental goals related to sustainability emphasize the importance of nature-based solutions (NBS), as grey infrastructure alone is insufficient to address current challenges. The majority of frameworks proposed in the literature fail to address the full potential of NBS, neglecting long-term results, unintended consequences, co-benefits, and their contribution to achieving global environmental agreements, such as the Agenda 2030, especially for water management in a peri-urban context. Here we present an innovative framework that can be applied to both NBS project planning and evaluation for several water-based challenges, giving practitioners and researchers a tool not only to evaluate ongoing projects but also to guide new ones. The framework considers three main stages of a NBS project: (1) context assessment, (2) NBS implementation and adaptation process, and (3) NBS results. This tool has the potential to be used to evaluate whether NBS projects are aligned with sustainability dimensions through a set of adaptable sustainability indicators. The framework can also highlight how the NBS targets are related to the sustainable development goals (SGD) and contribute to catalyzing the 2030 Agenda. The framework is an important tool for water management and other NBS types.

  • 6. Schulz, M.
    et al.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Palestinian NGOs’ Changed Work Dynamics: Before, During, and beyond the Oslo Process2020In: Middle East Critique, ISSN 1943-6149, E-ISSN 1943-6157, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 433-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on data collected from interviews with 41 Palestinian Non-Governmental Organizations (PNGOs) this article will show how they endured the dramatic structural changes that occurred with the advent of the Oslo process and consequently have changed the work dynamics of the PNGO sector in a fundamental manner, and thereby negatively affecting the way society at large and in this case, PNGOs work for the gratification of communities. We theorize around the PNGO’s own descriptions which in detail informs how earlier significant voluntary work in territories under Israeli occupation transformed through an NGOization process leading to professionalization and donor dependence of PNGOs.

  • 7.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Blue green infrastructure, from niche to mainstream: Challenges and opportunities for planning in Stockholm2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 166, article id 120528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for a transformation from conventional rainwater drainage systems towards Blue Green Infrastructure systems, designed as open spatial systems for sustainable rainwater management, is acknowledged. However, these systems are viewed as sociotechnical systems and, consequently, this transition has been slow. This paper focuses on the planning processes behind Blue Green Infrastructure projects in Stockholm and analyse them as transition experiments, addressing the question: what challenges and opportunities can be identified to enable the new systems to become a common component of rainwater management practices? Based on a literature review, this paper presents a methodological framework by identifying the key factors for facilitating or blocking sociotechnical change. These cluster around six categories ?? context, actors, instruments, processes, outputs and outcomes, and impacts. The paper used the framework to collect data and analyse three urban projects. Stockholm has remarkable strengths associated with moving towards new solutions, in terms of receptive contexts, human agency, space for experimentation, and a collaborative planning culture. However, there is a need for renegotiating the positional power of the actors involved in the planning systems in order to provide opportunities for water professionals to establish a stronger role in fitting the new solutions into the overall landscape, and urban planning processes and goals.

  • 8.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Civil Society: A Revived Mantra in the Development Discourse2011In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an assumption that the inclusion of civil society in governance processes promotes democratic performance and contributes to 'good governance', in the sense of pluralism, accountability and transparency. This paper refers to the governance process of the water utility in Accra involving the private sector, and examines the validity of the assumed roles regarding the inclusion of civil society in the governance process. For the purposes of this study, civil society is defined as 'non-state and non-market organisations that can, or have the potential to, champion democratic governance reforms and act as agents for political and socio-economic change'. Contrary to assumptions made about the inclusion of civil society, the analysis herein shows that the inclusion of civil groups in the governance process of the water utility led to hostile and undemocratic processes and to weak indicators of 'good governance'. The main concern of the key actors was centred on how to build consensus around the privatisation programme of the water utility. 'Managing consensus', however, is an inappropriate planning measure. It is argued here that the focus should rather be on how to design governance structures and arrangements, mobilised by legitimate and committed political leadership, to build and enhance the capacity of governance processes.

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  • 9.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Civil Society in the making: Can NGOs contribute to Development and Democracy2010In: Power to the People?: (Con-)Tested Civil Society in Search of Democracy / [ed] Heidi Moksnes and Mia Melin, Uppsala Centre for Sustainable Development , 2010, , p. 4p. 154-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the assumed role of civil society in the new policy agenda of ‘good governance’ promoted by bilateral and multilateral agencies. According to donors, civil society – often represented by nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) – can play a substantial role in the enhancement of development and the promotion of democracy. Through governance arrangements that are characterised by a limited role of the state and a flexible combination of governmental, private and civil actors, NGOs are predicted as missionaries to advance stagnated development and to consolidate youthful democracies (Van Rooy 1998).

     

    In the development field, civil society organisations (CSOs) are expected to reach the poor, improve equity, compensate for waning state services and help generate economic growth (Edwards and Hulme 1996; Van Rooy 1998). In the field of democracy, civil society allegedly fosters democratic values through the involvement of CSOs in micro-reform policies. The claim here is that the policy dialogue that integrates actors from NGOs, competitive business and local government can delineate solutions for public services provision, and enhance an effective partnership and pluralistic decision-making that is conceived of as a precondition of democratic structure (Brinkerhoff 2003).

     

    This paper bases its arguments primarily on a review of literature, and uses theories in relation to the role of civil society in development and democracy. It draws upon the theory of social origin of non-profit organisations, the theory of social capital and the theory of two publics in

    Africa – how the colonial background in Africa created two publics, the civic public and the primordial public – to raise concerns regarding the current policy trends of governance.

  • 10.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The NGOs and the Grand Illusions of Development and Democracy2013In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 241-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of civil society in the improvement of equitable development and the stimulation ofdemocratic culture has been notably recognised by international development agencies. In the newpolicy of "good governance" that proposes progress regarding development and democracy in parallelin the developing countries, civil society is often represented by nongovernmental organisations(NGOs).This paper bases its arguments primarily on theories in relation to the role of civil society with regardto development and democracy to raise concerns about current policy trends of "good governance" inthe general context of developing countries with main focus on Africa. The concerns are substantiatedby empirical verification through a review of literature. The paper concludes that NGOs are unlikely tohave the strength to either promote development or foster democracy.

  • 11.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Water supply governance in Accra: "authentic" or "symbolic"2010In: Water Policy, ISSN 1366-7017, E-ISSN 1996-9759, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 272-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses a governance theory framework to analyse the introductory process for the private sector managing and operating the public water utility Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL). The analysis was performed from three standpoints: process inputs, process conduct and process outcomes. The consultation process on involvement of the private sector was hostile and resulted in a "light" form of private sector participation in the form of a management contract that can be considered a de facto compromise, although not deliberate, by stakeholders. The challenges in improving the water sector performance and water supply services are profound. Because of continuing institutional, social, political and legal constraints, the involvement of the private sector per se is not the solution to providing long-term improvement in water services. The article concludes that it is misleading to leapfrog from government to governance, calling for the transmission of a governance "recipe", as conceptualised in the Western context, and to assume that it can work in an unaccommodating institutional context.

  • 12.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Khakee, Abdul
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rethinking water reform policies as a 'wicked problem' the case of urban water supply in Ghana2017In: International Planning Studies, ISSN 1356-3475, E-ISSN 1469-9265, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 320-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the theory of 'wicked problem' this paper investigates the causes of unsuccessful reform of urban water utilities in Accra, Ghana. The authors of this paper argue that reforms based only on managerial perspectives are not enough. Taking into account institutional and social issues is a key for the success of such reforms. Donors and international agencies lack such outlook and therefore fail to develop effective water policy reforms in developing countries generally. The paper discusses inter-twined and multi-dimensional institutional constraints that hinder the development of an appropriate approach to water utility reform in Accra.

  • 13.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Sauri, David
    Autonomous Univ Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain..
    Palau-Rof, Laura
    Autonomous Univ Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain..
    A breakthrough in urban rain -harvesting schemes through planning for urban greening: Case studies from Stockholm and Barcelona2020In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 51, article id 126678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A plethora of socioenvironmental issues, and growing concerns over the effects of climate change, are forcing cities to rethink conventional urban water management practices. However, change towards more sustainable practices has been remarkably slow. This paper examines two cases of greening projects aimed at urban rehabilitation in Stockholm and Barcelona, which have turned into examples of innovative approaches to urban rain management. Both cities share high densities and flooding problems in certain neighborhoods. Specifically, the paper attempts to answer three questions: 1) what were the driving forces and key factors that facilitated the breakthrough of urban rainwater-harvesting (URH) schemes based on the two cases?; 2) who were the actors involved and what were their roles in moving towards URH schemes?; and 3) how can URH schemes become part of multifunctional, sustainable urban systems? To answer these questions, the paper uses concepts of adaptive context and capacity, and of actor agency, drawn from the transitions literature, and opportunistic and guided flexibility planning drawn from the planning literature. Empirical material for both case studies was obtained from policy documents and semi-structured interviews with key actors. The main results show first political support for flexibility in public planning, the adaptive context and the capacity of the actors, especially in taking advantage of windows of opportunity for the materialisation of new ideas. Second, the design and implementation of these systems widened the number and scope of actors in urban water management, incorporating new professionals such as architects and involving more city agencies and organizations. Third, small scale URH systems contributed not only to control urban drainage but performed other functions such as the much-needed greening of dense areas in both cities.

  • 14.
    Suleiman, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Saurí, D.
    Palau-Rof, L.
    García Soler, N.
    Papasozomenou, O.
    Moss, T.
    Diverse pathways—common phenomena: comparing transitions of urban rainwater harvesting systems in Stockholm, Berlin and Barcelona2020In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 369-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban rainwater management is the terrain of varied initiatives that challenge existing drainage systems. The initiatives that this article refers to as Urban Rainwater Harvesting (URH), promise a more sustainable urban water approach; however, they remain isolated “niche” projects. The article aims to investigate challenges and opportunities for mainstreaming alternative URHs as sociotechnical systems (STS). It identifies six analytical categories: context, actors, instruments, processes/dynamics, outputs and impacts as a framework for the analyses of URH projects in Stockholm, Berlin and Barcelona. Despite the diversity of socio-spatial contexts, driving forces, purposes, instruments used, technical designs and scale of URH projects, relevant factors for a breakthrough of these systems are discussed. Even though URHs have not yet become a common component of rainwater management in any of the cities, context-specific combinations of these factors are found to be essential if these systems are to become complementary options for the sustainable management of rainwater in cities.

  • 15.
    Wedin, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Lundgren, M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Mushi, Catherine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Food versus fuel: The case of the makeni community in Sierra Leone2013In: Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, ISSN 1746-448X, E-ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 170, p. 37-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food security can be defined in terms of availability, access, and use of food. The study assesses whether the measures taken by Addax Bioenergy in the Makeni community in Sierra Leone are effective and sufficient to ensure food security locally as well as regionally. Land and water availability, agricultural intensification and infrastructure, self-sufficiency/market dependency and alternative income options have been identified as the main factors affecting food security in the project area. The main measures employed by Addax involve the use of an 'environmental, social and health impact assessment' (ESHIA) to identify and propose measures to mitigate any impacts that would adversely affect the food security of the region. The results show that the proposed measures for mitigating negative impacts on food security are in some instances inappropriate and inadequate, leaving the affected communities exposed to risks and shocks of food insecurity. It is also found that the insufficiency of mitigation measures is a result of weak governance and lack of oversight that may leave the community at the mercy of Addax Bioenergy.

  • 16.
    Ressano Garcia, Pedro (Editor)
    Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Suleiman, Lina (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Larsen, Katarina (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Climate-Proof Planning: Creative Design Solutions in Stockholm2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The waterfront of Stockholm, one of Europe's fastest-growing cities, stands at the forefront of climate change challenges. As such, there is a pressing need for innovative solutions and resilient urban design. The SOS Climate Waterfront research project gathered international experts and local representatives, coming from different disciplines to work together in May-June 2022 to discuss, explore proposals and design Sustainable Open Solutions (SOS).

    This book explores three urban sites in Stockholm, holding significant implications for the city's waterfront— Lövholmen, Frihamnen, and Södra Värtan. During the workshop, SOS Climate Waterfront participants, mainly European researchers, analyzed future challenges, raised new questions, and depicted solutions, which can now contribute to cross-country comparisons in a larger EU-framework.

    The three sites are not only driven by the demand for more housing but also face crucial issues related to cultural heritage, climate change, landscape ecology, and social development. Achieving a delicate balance between these aspects and economic interests presents a significant task for the city. The waterfront of Stockholm holds substantial relevance in the context of climate change and its impact on coastal areas. Thus, analysis of the Swedish context, based on data collected and on-site knowledge sustains a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

    Stockholm is expected to be affected by the impacts of climate change, including temperature increases, changing precipitation patterns, and the potential for more frequent cloudbursts. While the rising sea level is a long-term challenge rather than an immediate concern, increasing risks of extreme weather events and flooding were taken in consideration.

    Stockholm rests on two different bodies of water, at a location where the Baltic Sea (Östersjön in Swedish) with brackish water meets Lake Mälaren, which is an important provider of freshwater for the larger Stockholm area. As the lyrics of a popular contemporary Swedish song (by Robert Broberg) describe it: “the city is full of water”. However, to ensure that the ecological and chemical status will be maintained, in facing future challenges in terms of urbanisation and climate change, much attention has been paid to ensure the preservation of the water quality of the Mälaren Lake, a vital water source for two million people.

    The city values its water and continuously invests in improving the situation (e.g. the new sluice at Slussen). The activities carried out in the SOS Climate Waterfront workshop in Stockholm integrated this relationship to water as well as the continuing land-rise, the balance of which adds complexity to the sea level modelling and therefore also to the anticipations and scenarios for the future.

    In this book, the authors explore innovative strategies and design proposals to tackle these challenges while preserving the cultural identity and heritage value of the sites. Researchers from various European cities, supported by experts and academic lectures, analyze extensive input materials and information, ranging from planning documents and historical records to consultation reports and city visions. By drawing upon multidisciplinary backgrounds and experiences, the researchers identify the socioeconomic and environmental qualities of each site, ultimately developing site design concepts and solutions that address climate change challenges, the maintenance of cultural identities, and the protection of biodiversity.

    Throughout the book, the proposed designs emphasize the importance of finding a balance between preserving cultural heritage, the values of local communities, the stimulating economic growth, and promotion of sustainable urban development. Key elements include the reuse of existing infrastructure, the integration of green-blue schemes, the improvement of biodiversity, and the creation of vibrant and multi-functional neighbourhoods that connect people to each other and their surroundings.

    While design solutions present promising approaches, their implementation and the institutional challenges that may arise in specific city contexts remain external to the results presented here. The book acknowledges the need for further research and highlights the shared recognition among the workshop participants regarding the gaps and blind spots in their findings.

    The following chapters of the book delve into climate change in Sweden, the role of culture and arts in the environmental movement, and specific case studies and design proposals for each site. By exploring these diverse perspectives, this book aims to contribute to the ongoing discourse on sustainable urban design and planning, to inspire innovative approaches in addressing complex challenges faced by Stockholm in the future.

    PART 1 of the book offers a comprehensive understanding of climate change in Sweden, street fishing in Stockholm, and the role of culture and arts in the environmental movement in the Nordic Region and internationally. Furthermore, the lessons from Stockholm and its surroundings in this report draw on presentations, by professionals and researchers from various fields, made during the workshop. Some of these lessons have been written into interesting articles, introduced below.

    The chapter “Climate change in Sweden” by Magnus Joelsson from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) provides an updated analysis with data and the context for discussing climate change in Sweden. The text makes the distinction between weather and climate, referring to the expression “Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get” that Mark Twain is said to have coined. Moreover, calling for actions by emphasising that the trend of climate change is expected to continue, both globally and in Sweden. What will happen in the far future still depends on our actions, now and in the future.

    The contribution entitled “Urban nature does not stop at the waterfront, neither should urban planning, a case study of street fishing in Stockholm” raises questions about how planning and strategies for waterfront areas in cities should consider more perspectives from a wider group of interests. It discusses how urban dwellers live with water, with a focus on recreational fishing and what this use entails. The authors (Anja Moum Rieser, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Wieben Johannes Boonstra and Rikard Hedling, both from Uppsala University) go beyond the human-centric view and expand the gaze to other species’ needs and also incorporating the body of water in planning for the urban waterfront areas.

    The chapter “The role of culture and arts in the environmental movement in the Nordic Region and internationally” by Elisavet Papageorgiou and Iwona Preis from Intercult, discusses artistic perspectives on sustainability and climate change. This focuses on how art and culture can raise awareness, provide inspiring actions, and promote social cohesion around sustainable practices. Drawing on experiences from projects aiming to invite and engage community dialogues, they argue that artistic strategies can challenge dominant narratives and promote alternative visions for a sustainable future.

    The contribution “Sense the Marsh” by Thelma Dethelfsen from KTH The Royal Institute of Technology, emphasises the importance of architecture and landscape design in creating adaptive and resilient strategies to manage flooding and sea level rise. The study focuses on how designs can encourage interaction and awareness with the surroundings. Thereby highlighting the interfaces between humans and nature and raising questions about how flooding can be used as a quality and catalyst to attract more people to an area. The resulting design provides an opportunity to experience nature though the design and architectural solutions, situated on the border between human, non-human species and nature.

    In PART 2, readers will explore the detailed design proposals developed by different groups for the urban sites in focus. These proposals aim to intertwine sustainability, cultural identity, and economic interests, offering insights into the potential for resilient and vibrant urban spaces.

    By assessing existing conditions on three sites analysed in Stockholm, including Lövholmen, Frihamnen, and Södra Värtan, the teams participating in the workshop actively contributed to the analysis of the sites and development of design solutions for the areas, in the end forming strategies for better preparedness for future challenges and better lives for the inhabitants.

    Lövholmen is located in the north-western part of Liljeholmen, one of the major developmental centres in Stockholm. The area is currently a closed-off industrial site, but the municipality’s intention is to redevelop it into a mixed urban space with homes, workplaces, shops, schools, and more. It's expected that 1500 new homes will be built in the area. Many of the current industrial buildings are empty and in bad shape. While some of these will be replaced with housing, other industrial buildings have heritage value and should be protected during the development, after which a new use should be found for them. Frihamnen is, together with the Södra Värtan project, part of the larger development of ”Norra Djurgårdsstaden”, the Stockholm Royal Seaport. Frihamnen is located to the south of Värtahamnen and is in turn strongly connected to Loudden in the south. The municipality plans for the area to contain approximately 1700 homes, 4000 workplaces and 75,000 m2 of retail and office space. Some of the existing businesses in Frihamnen will remain, but much of the existing infrastructure is planned to be removed. The harbour no longer handles freight shipping, but passenger ships will continue to depart from the harbour (Frihamnspiren).

    Södra Värtan is planned to contain 1500 apartments, 20 preschool departments, 155,000 m2 of office and retail space, as well as 10,000 m2 of parks and a 600 m long waterfront walkway. The new development is intended to co-exist with the activities in the harbour, which creates challenges such as the blocking of noise stemming from the cruise ships. The walkways along the waterfront are planned to have shops and restaurants.

    The contributions of the articles, together with the SOS Climate Waterfront teams’ analysis of the three sites in Stockholm, provides relevant and timely interdisciplinary efforts to co-create novel solutions and future strategies to manage the climate challenges ahead.

    The solutions relate to the history of the urban territory, actors involved (or those excluded) and changes, over time, of planning ideals. A key theme is how to plan by creating inclusive strategies for the future by involving representatives of diverse interests, competences, and future visions for the sites. The consequences of climate change are affecting these different stakeholders and citizens in a wide range of ways, so including them in the process is crucial. This also includes the inclusion of future generations’ views on urban transformation. The largest challenge is to create new, novel solutions where these human interests, as well as those of local nature and non-human species, can be incorporated, in an effort to plan and design for a mitigation and management of the consequences of climate change.

    As we embark on this journey of exploration and innovation, we invite readers to delve into the pages of this book, where interdisciplinary research, creative design, and a shared commitment to sustainable urban development and decarbonisation strategies converge. Together, let us envision a future where cities thrive, harmoniously balancing their heritage, environment, and economic aspirations.

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