Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Kim, D. -Y
    et al.
    Ih, J. -G
    Zhang, Zhe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    A virtual herschel-quincke tube using slow sound2017In: INTER-NOISE 2017 - 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, Institute of Noise Control Engineering , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While an acoustic wave propagates along a duct, of which the wall is treated with either dissipative or a reactive material, the phase speed can be slowed down because of wave dispersion. It has been thought that such slow sound can be used for a novel control method to reduce the in-duct noise at low to medium frequencies generated from a fluid machinery system. In this work, the Herschel-Quincke tube (hereafter, H-Q tube), which exploits the path length difference of two parallel ducts, is modified to demonstrate the application potential of the slow sound. A test rig is designed to create the two different phase speeds by arranging the two parallel, equal-length ducts inside a main duct, one of them is hard-walled and the other one lined with a periodic array of resonators. This slow sound H-Q device is then modelled by both analytical and numerical methods assuming a plane wave incidence. Also, an experiment is conducted to measure the transmission loss. The result reveals a low frequency peak (TL-30 dB) in the range of 200-400 Hz, which occurs far below the lowest resonance of the resonator. At the original resonance frequency of 691 Hz, a small attenuation (TL~6 dB) is obtained due to the fact that one duct is subject to a high loss, and the other is without appreciable loss. The result clearly demonstrates the potential of applying slow sound device to overcome the spatial limitation of the classical H-Q tube.

  • 2.
    Netto Spillere, Andre Mateus
    et al.
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Mech Engn, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil.;Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Acoust & Vibrat Lab, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Zhang, Zhe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Cordioli, Julio Apolinario
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Mech Engn, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil.;Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Acoust & Vibrat Lab, BR-88040900 Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Optimum Impedance in the Presence of an Inviscid Sheared Flow2019In: AIAA Journal, ISSN 0001-1452, E-ISSN 1533-385X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 1044-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, much effort has been devoted to find the "optimum impedance" (i.e., the impedance that results in the maximum modal decay rate in flow duct acoustics for a given frequency, Mach number, and azimuthal mode order). Although such analysis can be carried out by means of numerical simulations, analytical expressions can also be derived to predict the optimum impedance. Previous works have been concerned with the optimum impedance of higher-order modes in rectangular ducts with uniform flow. In this work, the analysis is expanded to circular ducts for both uniform and sheared inviscid flows. Focus is given to typical operating conditions found in turbofan engine intakes and vehicle exhaust systems. It is shown that, in certain conditions, the optimum impedance is affected even by the presence of a small boundary-layer thickness. It is also noted that, for low Helmholtz numbers, the optimum impedance may have a negative resistance.

  • 3.
    Zhang, Zhe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Optimal damping and slow sound in ducts2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis is dedicated to expanding knowledge on two duct acoustic issues including: 1) the optimal damping of low frequency sound and 2) the development and application of ‘slow sound’.

    To address the first issue, the ‘Cremer impedance’ proposed more than half a century ago has been revisited and further developed. The original motivation is to extend the concept from large duct applications, such as aero-engines, to low frequency applications including vehicle intake and exhaust or cooling and ventilation systems. This leads to the derivation of the ‘exact’ solution of the Cremer impedance for single-lined rectangular ducts valid in the low frequency range in the presence of a ‘plug’ flow. A substantial improvement in the low frequency damping is achieved with the exact solution and a measurement campaign is carried out to validate this.

    However, for both circular and rectangular ducts (including single-lined and double-lined types) the exact solution of the Cremer impedance has a negative real part in the low frequency range. This indicates that an active boundary is required to provide the optimal damping. Two investigations on the negative resistance are conducted. First, the ‘plug’ flow is replaced by a sheared flow by changing the boundary condition in the optimization model. With this modification, the Cremer impedance is recalculated and the negative resistance is still found in most cases, demonstrating that the negative resistance is not necessarily an artefact of the boundary condition. Second, since the Cremer impedance is based on mode-merging, a mode-merging analysis is carried out. The merging result shows that the downstream results are always valid, but some of the upstream results in the low frequency range are invalid in the sense that unexpected mode pairs merge, and the corresponding damping is smaller than expected. This finding is true for both the fundamental mode and higher order modes.

    Regarding the second issue, ‘slow sound’ or sound with a much reduced ‘phase velocity’ is investigated using a resonant periodic system in the low frequency range. This can be seen as an acoustic metamaterial where sound propagates at a much smaller-than-normal speed around its resonance frequency. Following a hydrodynamic particle agglomeration model, the slow sound is applied to manipulate the distribution of small particles in the vehicle exhaust system. Although in principle this acoustic agglomeration method can work, it will only be efficient if the wave damping in the metamaterial is kept small. 

  • 4.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    The Cremer Impedance: An Investigation of the Low Frequency BehaviorManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cremer impedance, first proposed by Cremer (1953) and then extended by Tester (1973), is supposed to give the maximum propagation damping in an infinitely long waveguide. Previous works including a uniform grazing flow have shown negative resistance in the low frequency range for both circular and 2-D rectangular waveguides, i.e., implying an active boundary. In order to further analyze the low frequency behaviour of the Cremer impedance, especially the negative resistance, two investigations are conducted in the current work. First, the previously used Ingard-Myers boundary condition is replaced by the Brambley boundary condition with the introduction of a thin inviscid boundary layer, and results obtained with the two boundary conditions are compared to see the effect of a sheared flow. The frequency range where the two boundary conditions can be applied is also analyzed. Second, discussions regarding the validity of the low frequency result in both the up- and downstream directions from the perspective of mode-merging are presented. This analysis is further extended from the fundamental mode to higher order modes in the frequency range where they are ‘just cut-on’.

  • 5.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    The Cremer impedance: An investigation of the low frequency behavior2019In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 459, article id 114844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cremer impedance concept based on mode merging is one method that can substantially improve the axial damping in a waveguide. Previous works on the Cremer impedance including a uniform grazing flow have exhibited unexpected phenomenon such as negative resistance in the low frequency range. The current paper is a continuation of earlier works by the authors to extend the investigation of the Cremer impedance with a focus on the low frequency range. Two independent investigations from the perspective of boundary layer effects and mode merging patterns are conducted to better understand the low frequency behavior of the Cremer impedance.

  • 6.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lin, D.
    Xiaodong, J.
    Investigation of the 'exact' cremer impedance2018In: 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling, International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV , 2018, p. 1810-1817Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Cremer impedance, first proposed by Cremer (Acustica 3, 1953) and then improved by Tester (JSV 28, 1973), refers to the locally reacting boundary condition that can maximize the attenuation of a certain acoustic mode in a uniform waveguide. One limitation in Tester's work is that it simplified the analysis on the effect of flow by only considering high frequencies or the 'well cut-on' modes. This approximation is reasonable for large duct applications, e.g., aero-engines, but not for many other cases of interest such as the vehicle intake and exhaust systems. A recent modification done by Kabral et al. (Acta Acustica united with Acustica 102, 2016) has removed this limitation and investigated the 'exact' solution of Cremer impedance, which reveals an appreciable difference between the exact and classic solution in the low frequency range. A measurement campaign is here carried out to experimentally demonstrate such difference. In addition, the exact solution is found to exhibit some special properties at very low frequencies, e.g., a negative resistance. One can question if this negative resistance is physically correct or an artefact of the assumption of a plug flow profile and the use of the so-called Ingard-Myers boundary condition. To investigate this the Cremer solution is here extended to the case with a more general and realistic flow profile, using a modified version of the Ingard-Myers condition suggested by Brambley (AIAA J 49(6), 2011).

  • 7.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Tiikoja, Heiki
    KTH.
    Peerlings, Luck
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Experimental Analysis on the 'Exact' Cremer Impedance in Rectangular Ducts2018In: SAE technical paper series, ISSN 0148-7191, Vol. 2018-June, no JuneArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cremer impedance, first proposed by Cremer (Acustica 3, 1953) and then improved by Tester (JSV 28, 1973), refers to the locally reacting boundary condition that can maximize the attenuation of a certain acoustic mode in a uniform waveguide. One limitation in Tester's work is that it simplified the analysis on the effect of flow by only considering high frequencies or the 'well cut-on' modes. This approximation is reasonable for large duct applications, e.g., aero-engines, but not for many other cases of interest, with the vehicle intake and exhaust system included. A recent modification done by Kabral et al. (Acta Acustica united with Acustica 102, 2016) has removed this limitation and investigated the 'exact' solution of Cremer impedance for circular waveguides, which reveals an appreciable difference between the exact and classic solution in the low frequency range. Consequently, the exact solution can lead to a much higher low-frequency attenuation level. In addition, the exact solution is found to exhibit some special properties at very low frequencies, e.g., a negative resistance. In this paper, liners designed on the basis of the exact solution are tested and the difference between the exact and classic solution in the low frequency range (not low enough to go into the negative resistance region) is experimentally investigated.

  • 8.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Tiikoja, Heiki
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Experimental analysis of whistle noise in a particle agglomeration pipe2018In: INTER-NOISE 2018 - 47th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Impact of Noise Control Engineering, Institute of Noise Control Engineering , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A self-sustained sound, more usually known as a whistle, refers to a distinct tonal noise created due to the interaction between the sound and flow field. When a positive feedback loop is formed between the two fields, the energy in the mean flow will be transferred into the sound wave, thus giving rise to a whistle. In engineering practice, whistles are destructive as they can produce high sound and vibration levels and may result in risk for mechanical failures. In this work, a flow-related high level tonal noise was found during a measurement on a particle agglomeration pipe, which is a quasi-periodic corrugated structure designed for the exhaust system of heavy-duty trucks. The purpose of the pipe is to enhance particle agglomeration to increase the size of exhaust gas particles. To investigate the origin of the detected tonal noise additional measurements were carried out. Based on the measurement result, the aero-acoustic coupling in the agglomeration pipe was analyzed, revealing that the pipe has a large potentiality to amplify the incident sound power in the presence of a mean flow. Furthermore, the Nyquist stability criterion was applied to confirm the existence of exponentially growing modes in the system at certain conditions.

  • 9.
    Zhang, Zhe
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    ‘Double-’ and ‘Triple-root’ Cremer Impedancefor a Rectangular Duct with Opposite Lined WallsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve high low frequency damping in an infinitely long double-lined rectangular duct with zero mean flow, the optimization of axial sound attenuation in the sense defined by Cremer (i.e., using the ‘Cremer impedance/solution’ concept) is examined for the fundamental mode. Two double-root Cremer impedance solutions that merge a mode pair into a single mode are presented. Different mode-merging patterns due to symmetry are found for these two solutions. As an extension, two triple-root Cremer impedance solutions (including one with a negative resistance) that merge three modes are also provided by extending the optimum condition proposed by Cremer. The two triple root solutions are theoretically advantageous in damping compared with the double root solutions, and the advantage is explained from the perspective of mode-merging.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf