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  • 1.
    Choi, Hyungryul J.
    et al.
    MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA 95014 USA..
    Park, Kyoo-Chul
    MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Northwestern Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Evanston, IL 60208 USA..
    Lee, Hyomin
    MIT, Dept Chem Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Harvard Univ, John A Paulson Sch Engn & Appl Sci, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA..
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). MIT, Dept Biol Engn, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 US.
    Rubner, Michael F.
    MIT, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Cohen, Robert E.
    MIT, Dept Chem Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Barbastathis, George
    MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.;Singapore MIT Alliance Res & Technol SMART Ctr, Singapore, Singapore..
    McKinley, Gareth H.
    MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Superoleophilic Titania Nanoparticle Coatings with Fast Fingerprint Decomposition and High Transparency2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 8354-8360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low surface tension sebaceous liquids such as human fingerprint oils are readily deposited on high energy surfaces such as clean glass, leaving smudges that significantly lower transparency. There have been several attempts to prevent formation of these dactylograms on glass by employing oil-repellent textured surfaces. However, nanotextured superoleophobic coatings typically scatter visible light, and the intrinsic thermodynamic metastability of the composite superoleophobic state can result in failure of the oil repellency under moderate contact pressure. We develop titania-based porous nanoparticle coatings that are superoleophilic and highly transparent and which exhibit short time scales for decomposition of fingerprint oils under ultraviolet light. The mechanism by which a typical dactylogram is consumed combines wicking of the sebum into the nanoporous titania structure followed by photocatalytic degradation. We envision a wide range of applications because these TiO2 nanostructured surfaces remain photocatalytically active against fingerprint oils in natural sunlight and are also compatible with flexible glass substrates.

  • 2.
    Kootala, Sujit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Filho, L.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Linderberg, Victoria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Moussa, A.
    David, L.
    Trombotto, S.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Reinforcing Mucus Barrier Properties with Low Molar Mass Chitosans2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mucus gel covers the wet epithelia that forms the inner lining of the body. It constitutes our first line of defense protecting the body from infections and other deleterious molecules. Failure of the mucus barrier can lead to the inflammation of the mucosa such as in inflammatory bowel diseases. Unfortunately, there are no effective strategies that reinforce the mucus barrier properties to recover or enhance its ability to protect the epithelium. Herein, we describe a mucus engineering approach that addresses this issue where we physically cross-link the mucus gel with low molar mass chitosan variants to reinforce its barrier functions. We tested the effect of these chitosans on mucus using in-lab purified porcine gastric mucins, which mimic the native properties of mucus, and on mucus-secreting HT29-MTX epithelial cell cultures. We found that the lowest molar mass chitosan variant (degree of polymerization of 8) diffuses deep into the mucus gels while physically cross-linking the mucin polymers, whereas the higher molar mass chitosan variants (degree of polymerization of 52 and 100) interact only superficially. The complexation resulted in a tighter mucin polymer mesh that slowed the diffusion of dextran polymers and of the cholera toxin B subunit protein through the mucus gels. These results uncover a new use for low molar mass mucoadhesive polymers such as chitosans as noncytotoxic mucosal barrier enhancers that could be valuable in the prevention and treatment of mucosal diseases.

  • 3.
    Petrou, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Mucins as multifunctional building blocks of biomaterials2018In: Biomaterials Science, ISSN 2047-4830, E-ISSN 2047-4849, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 2282-2297Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucins are large glycoproteins that are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom. Mucins coat the surfaces of many cell types and can be secreted to form mucus gels that assume important physiological roles in many animals. Our growing understanding of the structure and function of mucin molecules and their functionalities has sparked interest in investigating the use of mucins as building blocks for innovative functional biomaterials. These pioneering studies have explored how new biomaterials can benefit from the barrier properties, hydration and lubrication properties, unique chemical diversity, and bioactivities of mucins. Owing to their multifunctionality, mucins have been used in a wide variety of applications, including as antifouling coatings, as selective filters, and artificial tears and saliva, as basis for cosmetics, as drug delivery materials, and as natural detergents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding key mucin properties and survey how they have been put to use. We offer a vision for how mucins could be used in the near future and what challenges await the field before biomaterials made of mucins and mucin-mimics can be translated into commercial products.

  • 4.
    Petrou, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Hogqvist, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Genetically Engineered Mucoadhesive Spider Silk2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 3268-3279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucoadhesion is defined as the adhesion of a material to the mucus gel covering the mucous membranes. The mechanisms controlling mucoadhesion include nonspecific electrostatic interactions and specific interactions between the materials and the mucins, the heavily glycosylated proteins that form the mucus gel. Mucoadhesive materials can be used to develop mucosal wound dressings and noninvasive transmucosal drug delivery systems. Spider silk, which is strong, biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and lightweight would serve as an excellent base for the development of such materials. Here, we investigated two variants of the partial spider silk protein 4RepCT genetically engineered in order to functionalize them with mucoadhesive properties. The pLys-4RepCT variant was functionalized with six cationically charged lysines, aiming to provide nonspecific adhesion from electrostatic interactions with the anionically charged mucins, while the hGal3-4RepCT variant was genetically fused with the Human Galectin-3 Carbohydrate Recognition Domain which specifically binds the mucin glycans Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc and Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc. First, we demonstrated that coatings, fibers, meshes, and foams can be readily made from both silk variants. Measured by the adsorption of both bovine submaxillary mucin and pig gastric mucin, the newly produced silk materials showed enhanced mucin binding properties compared with materials of wild-type (4RepCT) silk. Moreover, we showed that pLys-4RepCT silk coatings bind mucins through electrostatic interactions, while hGal3-4RepCT silk coatings bind mucins through specific glycan-protein interactions. We envision that the two new mucoadhesive silk variants pLys-4RepCT and hGal3-4RepCT, alone or combined with other biofunctional silk proteins, constitute useful new building blocks for a range of silk protein-based materials for mucosal treatments.

  • 5.
    Petrou, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Högqvist, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Engineering mucoadhesive silk2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Yan, Hongji
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Chircov, Cristina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhong, Xueying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Winkeljann, Benjamin
    Tech Univ Munich, Dept Mech Engn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Munich Sch Bioengn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nilsson, Harriet Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Lieleg, Oliver
    Tech Univ Munich, Dept Mech Engn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Munich Sch Bioengn, Boltzmannstr 11, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Reversible Condensation of Mucins into Nanoparticles2018In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 34, no 45, p. 13615-13625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucins are high molar mass glycoproteins that assume an extended conformation and can assemble into mucus hydrogels that protect our mucosal epithelium. In nature, the challenging task of generating a mucus layer, several hundreds of micrometers in thickness, from micrometer-sized cells is elegantly solved by the condensation of mucins inside vesicles and their on-demand release from the cells where they suddenly expand to form the extracellular mucus hydrogel. We aimed to recreate and control the process of compaction for mucins, the first step toward a better understanding of the process and creating biomimetic in vivo delivery strategies of macromolecules. We found that by adding glycerol to the aqueous solvent, we could induce drastic condensation of purified mucin molecules, reducing their size by an order of magnitude down to tens of nanometers in diameter. The condensation effect of glycerol was fully reversible and could be further enhanced and partially stabilized by cationic cross-linkers such as calcium and polylysine. The change of structure of mucins from extended molecules to nano-sized particles in the presence of glycerol translated into macroscopic rheological changes, as illustrated by a dampened shear-thinning effect with increasing glycerol concentration. This work provides new insight into mucin condensation, which could lead to new delivery strategies mimicking cell release of macromolecules condensed in vesicles such as mucins and heparin.

1 - 6 of 6
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