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  • 1.
    Alexakis, Alexandros Efraim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jerlhagen, Åsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Eliasson, Adrian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    School of Materials Science and Engineering Nanyang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue Singapore 639798 Singapore.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Modification of CNF‐Networks by the Addition of Small Amounts of Well‐Defined Rigid Cationic Nanolatexes2022In: Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, ISSN 1022-1352, E-ISSN 1521-3935, Vol. 224, no 1, p. 2200249-2200249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibril (CNF)-networks are modified by the addition of small amounts (below 10 wt%) of well-defined cationic nanolatexes synthesized through reversible addition–fragmentation chain-transfer-mediated polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Minute amounts of nanolatex inclusions lead to increased tensile and shear moduli, indicating that nanolatexes can act as bridging-points between CNFs. At higher nanolatex content, this stiffening effect is lost, likely due to interactions between nanolatexes leading to plasticization. The influence of nanolatex content and size on interparticle distance is discussed and is used as a tool to understand the effects observed in macroscopic properties. Upon annealing, the stiffening effect is lost due to the softening of the nanolatexes, indicating that the core–shell morphology is a prerequisite for this effect. These systems form a versatile platform to develop fundamental insights into complex condensed colloidal systems, to ultimately aid in the development of new sustainable material concepts.

  • 2.
    Alexakis, Alexandros Efraim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Telaretti Leggieri, Rosella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore, Singapore.
    Nanolatex architectonics: Influence of cationic charge density and size on their adsorption onto surfaces with a 2D or 3D distribution of anionic groups2023In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 634, p. 610-620Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alipoormazandarani, Niloofar
    et al.
    Lakehead Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada.;Abo Akad Univ, Lab Nat Mat Technol, Turku, Finland..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wang, Luyao
    Abo Akad Univ, Lab Nat Mat Technol, Turku, Finland..
    Wang, Xiaoju
    Abo Akad Univ, Lab Nat Mat Technol, Turku, Finland..
    Xu, Chunlin
    Abo Akad Univ, Lab Nat Mat Technol, Turku, Finland..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Willfor, Stefan
    Abo Akad Univ, Lab Nat Mat Technol, Turku, Finland..
    Fatehi, Pedram
    Lakehead Univ, Dept Chem Engn, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada.;Qilu Univ Technol, State Key Lab Biobased Mat & Green Papermaking, Jinan, Shandong, Peoples R China..
    Functional Lignin Nanoparticles with Tunable Size and Surface Properties: Fabrication, Characterization, and Use in Layer-by-Layer Assembly2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 22, p. 26308-26317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin is the richest source of renewable aromatics and has immense potential for replacing synthetic chemicals. The limited functionality of lignin is, however, challenging for its potential use, which motivates research for creating advanced functional lignin-derived materials. Here, we present an aqueous-based acid precipitation method for preparing functional lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) from carboxy-methylated or carboxy-pentylated lignin. We observe that the longer grafted side chains of carboxy-pentylated lignin allow for the formation of larger LNPs. The functional nanoparticles have high tolerance against salt and aging time and well-controlled size distribution with R-h <= 60 nm over a pH range of 5-11. We further investigate the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of the LNPs and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) using a stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Results demonstrate that LNPs made of carboxypentylated lignin (i.e., PLNPs with the adsorbed mass of 3.02 mg/m(2)) form a more packed and thicker adlayer onto the PAH surface compared to those made of carboxymethylated lignin (i.e., CLNPs with the adsorbed mass of 2.51 mg/m(2)). The theoretical flux, J, and initial rate of adsorption, (d Gamma/dt)(0), analyses confirm that 22% of PLNPs and 20% of CLNPs arriving at the PAH surface are adsorbed. The present study provides a feasible platform for engineering LNPs with a tunable size and adsorption behavior, which can be adapted in hionanomaterial production.

  • 4.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Design of Cellulose-based Materials by Supramolecular Assemblies2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to climate change and plastic pollution, there is an increasing demand for bio-based materials with similar properties to those of common plastics yet biodegradable. In this respect, cellulose is a strong candidate that is already being refined on a large industrial scale, but the properties differ significantly from those of common plastics in terms of shapeability and water-resilience.

    This thesis investigates how supramolecular interactions can be used to tailor the properties of cellulose-based materials by modifying cellulose surfaces or control the assembly of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). Most of the work is a fundamental study on interactions in aqueous environments, but some material concepts are presented and potential applications are discussed.

    The first part deals with the modification of cellulose by the spontaneous adsorption of xyloglucan or polyelectrolytes. The results indicate that xyloglucan adsorbs to cellulose due to the increased entropy of water released from the surfaces, which is similar to the increased entropy of released counter-ions that drives polyelectrolyte adsorption. The polyelectrolyte adsorption depends on the charge of the cellulose up to a limit after which the charge density affects only the first adsorbed layer in a multilayer formation.

    Latex nanoparticles with polyelectrolyte coronas can be adsorbed onto cellulose in order to prepare hydrophobic cellulose surfaces with strong and ductile wet adhesion, provided the glass transition of the core is below the ambient temperature.

    The second part of the thesis seeks to explain the interactions between different types of cellulose nanofibrils in the presence of different ions, using a model consisting of ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects, which can be employed to rationally design water-resilient and transparent nanocellulose films. The addition of small amounts of alginate also creates interpenetrating double networks, and these networks lead to a synergy which improves both the stiffness and the ductility of the films in water.

    A network model has been developed to understand these materials, with the aim to explain the properties of fibril networks, based on parameters such as the aspect ratio of the fibrils, the solidity of the network, and the ion-induced interactions that increase the friction between fibrils. With the help of this network model and the model for ion-induced interactions, we have created films with wet-strengths surpassing those of common plastics, or a ductility suitable for hygroplastic forming into water-resilient and biodegradable packages. Due to their transparency, water content, and the biocompatibility of cellulose, these materials are also suitable for biomaterial or bioelectronics applications. 

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  • 5.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cranston, Emily D.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University.
    Ondaral, Sedat
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Karadeniz Technical University.
    Johansson, Erik
    Cellutech AB.
    Brumer, Harry
    The Michael Smith Laboratories and the Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Adsorption of Xyloglucan onto Cellulose Surfaces of Different Morphologies: An Entropy-Driven Process2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 2801-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature-dependence of xyloglucan (XG) adsorption onto smooth cellulose model films regenerated from N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) was investigated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the adsorbed amount increased with increasing temperature. This implies that the adsorption of XG to NMMO-regenerated cellulose is endothermic and supports the hypothesis that the adsorption of XG onto cellulose is an entropy-driven process. We suggest that XG adsorption is mainly driven by the release of water molecules from the highly hydrated cellulose surfaces and from the XG molecules, rather than through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as previously suggested. To test this hypothesis, the adsorption of XG onto cellulose was studied using cellulose films with different morphologies prepared from cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), semicrystalline NMMO-regenerated cellulose, and amorphous cellulose regenerated from lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide. The total amount of high molecular weight xyloglucan (XGHMW) adsorbed was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and reflectometry measurements, and it was found that the adsorption was greatest on the amorphous cellulose followed by the CNC and NMMO-regenerated cellulose films. There was a significant correlation between the cellulose dry film thickness and the adsorbed XG amount, indicating that XG penetrated into the films. There was also a correlation between the swelling of the films and the adsorbed amounts and conformation of XG, which further strengthened the conclusion that the water content and the subsequent release of the water upon adsorption are important components of the adsorption process.

  • 6.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Supramolecular double networks of cellulose nanofibrils and algal polysaccharides with excellent wet mechanical properties2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 2558-2570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supramolecular double network films, consisting of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) entangled with the algal polysaccharides alginate or carrageenan, were prepared using a rapid vacuum filtration process to achieve water-resistant CNF nanopapers with excellent mechanical properties in both the wet and dry states following the locking of the structures using Ca2+. The rigid network of calcium alginate was more efficient than the more flexible network of calcium carrageenan and 10% by weight of alginate was sufficient to form a network that suppressed the swelling of the CNF film by over 95%. The resulting material could be compared to a stiff rubber with a Young's modulus of 135 MPa, a tensile strength of 17 MPa, a strain-at-break above 55%, and a work of fracture close to 5 MJ m(-3) in the wet state, which was both significantly stronger and more ductile than the calcium-treated CNF reference nanopaper. It was shown that the state in which Ca2+ was introduced is crucial, and it is also hypothesized that the alginate works as a sacrificial network that prevents the CNF from aligning during loading and that this leads to the increased toughness. The material maintained its barrier properties at elevated relative humidities and the extensibility and ductility made possible hygroplastic forming into three-dimensional shapes. It is suggested that the attractive force in the CNF part of the double network in the presence of multivalent ions is due to the ion-ion correlation forces generated by the fluctuating counter-ion cloud, since no significant ion coordination was observed using FTIR.

  • 7.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henschen, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Polyelectrolyte multilayers on differently charged cellulose surfaces2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798, Singapore, Singapore.
    Kummer, Nico
    Laboratory for Cellulose & Wood Materials, Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600, Dübendorf, Switzerland, Überlandstrasse 129; Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, 8092, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fall, Andreas B.
    RISE Bioeconomy, 114 28, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyström, Gustav
    Laboratory for Cellulose & Wood Materials, Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600, Dübendorf, Switzerland, Überlandstrasse 129; Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, 8092, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The Colloidal Properties of Nanocellulose2023In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, Vol. 16, no 8, article id e202201955Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocelluloses are anisotropic nanoparticles of semicrystalline assemblies of glucan polymers. They have great potential as renewable building blocks in the materials platform of a more sustainable society. As a result, the research on nanocellulose has grown exponentially over the last decades. To fully utilize the properties of nanocelluloses, a fundamental understanding of their colloidal behavior is necessary. As elongated particles with dimensions in a critical nanosize range, their colloidal properties are complex, with several behaviors not covered by classical theories. In this comprehensive Review, we describe the most prominent colloidal behaviors of nanocellulose by combining experimental data and theoretical descriptions. We discuss the preparation and characterization of nanocellulose dispersions, how they form networks at low concentrations, how classical theories cannot describe their behavior, and how they interact with other colloids. We then show examples of how scientists can use this fundamental knowledge to control the assembly of nanocellulose into new materials with exceptional properties. We hope aspiring and established researchers will use this Review as a guide.

  • 9.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles are governed by ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 3514-3520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles can be explained by a model consisting of ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects: dispersion interactions, metal-ligand complexes, and local acidic environments. Films of cellulose nanofibrils and montmorillonite clay were treated with different ions, and their subsequent equilibrium swelling in water was related to important parameters of the model in order to investigate the relative importance of the mechanisms. Ion-ion correlation was shown to be the fundamental attraction, supplemented by dispersion interaction for polarizable ions such as Ca2+ and Ba2+, or metal-ligand complexes for ions such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Fe3+. Ions that form strong complexes induce local acidic environments that also contribute to the assembly. These findings are summarized in a comprehensive semi-quantitative model and are important for the design of nanomaterials and for understanding biological systems where specific ions are involved.

  • 10.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindstrom, Stefan B.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Solid Mech, Dept Management & Engn, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Fibre Technol, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Explaining the Exceptional Wet Integrity of Transparent Cellulose Nanofibril Films in the Presence of Multivalent Ions-Suitable Substrates for Biointerfaces2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 13, article id 1900333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) assemble into water-resilient materials in the presence of multivalent counter-ions. The essential mechanisms behind these assemblies are ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. A network model shows that the interfibril attraction indirectly influences the wet modulus by a fourth power relationship to the solidity of the network (E-w proportional to phi(4)). Ions that induce both ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects significantly reduce the swelling of the films, and due to the nonlinear relationship dramatically increase the wet modulus. Herein, this network model is used to explain the elastoplastic behavior of wet films of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-oxidized, carboxymethylated, and phosphorylated CNFs in the presence of different counter-ions. The main findings are that the aspect ratio of the CNFs influences the ductility of the assemblies, that the bivalency of phosphorylate ligands probably limits the formation of interfibril complexes with divalent ions, and that a higher charge density increases the friction between fibrils by increasing the short-range attraction from ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. These findings can be used to rationally design CNF materials for a variety of applications where wet strength, ductility, and transparency are important, such as biomaterials or substrates for bioelectronics.

  • 11.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan
    Linköping University.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Explaining the exceptional wet integrity of transparent cellulose nanofibril films in the presence of multivalent ions - Suitable substrates for biointerfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils as a platform for tunable hydrogels, aerogels, and chemical modifications2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Unidirectional Swelling of Dynamic Cellulose Nanofibril Networks: A Platform for Tunable Hydrogels and Aerogels with 3D Shapeability2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 2406-2412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A process has been developed to create self-supporting hydrogels with low solids content (down to 0.5 wt %) and anisotropic aerogels with a low density (down to 5 kg/m(3)) from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). The CNF networks were formed by vacuum filtration of dilute dispersions (0.2 wt %) of 90% CNFs and 10% alginate. We call this process "the dynamic CNF network approach" since the solids content of these hydrogels can be tuned in the range of 0.5-3 wt % by reswelling the filter cakes in a medium with a controlled osmotic pressure. These hydrogels are significantly stronger than the 1-2 wt % CNF gels typically used to prepare hydrogels and aerogels because the dynamic CNF networks are formed below their arrested state threshold (ca. 0.5 wt %) and are thus homogeneous. The vacuum filtration leads to a directional reswelling vertical to the plane of the filter cake, and this is crucial in order to turn a two-dimensional (2D) shape, cut from the filter cake, into a 3D hydrogel without distorting the 2D shape. The anisotropic swelling was used to create intricate 3D-shaped hydrogels and solved some of the issues involved in the degassing and molding of high-viscosity CNF gels. Multivalent ions were used to lock the CNF and alginate networks at the desired solids content and 3D shape, and resulted in an increase by an order of magnitude in storage modulus. Moreover, the self-supporting nature of the hydrogels allowed us to freeze-cast them into anisotropic aerogels with the same 3D shape without using any container. The 5 kg/m(3) aerogel had a specific modulus of 43 kN m/kg and an anisotropy index of 12, which are impressive properties in relation to earlier experiences. The process can be used for applications where a precise control of density and shape is critical.

  • 14.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of Surface Charge Density and Morphology on the Formation of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers on Smooth Charged Cellulose Surfaces2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 968-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To clarify the importance of the surface charge for the formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers, layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) have been investigated on cellulose films with different carboxylic acid contents (20, 350, 870, and 1200 μmol/g) regenerated from oxidized cellulose. The wet cellulose films were thoroughly characterized prior to multilayer deposition using quantitative nanomechanical mapping (QNM), which showed that the mechanical properties were greatly affected by the degree of oxidation of the cellulose. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements were used to determine the surface potential of the cellulose films by fitting the force data to the DLVO theory. With the exception of the 1200 μmol/g film, the force measurements showed a second-order polynomial increase in surface potential with increasing degree of oxidation. The low surface potential for the 1200 μmol/g film was attributed to the low degree of regeneration of the cellulose film in aqueous media due to increasing solubility with increasing charge. The multilayer formation was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation-point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). Extensive deswelling was observed for the charged films when pDADMAC was adsorbed due to the reduced osmotic pressure when ions inside the film were released, and the 1:1 charge compensation showed that all the charges in the films were reached by the pDADMAC. The multilayer formation was not significantly affected by the charge density above 350 μmol/g due to interlayer repulsions, but it was strongly affected by the salt concentration during the layer build-up.

  • 15.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, CPE, C2P2,CNRS, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, CPE, C2P2,CNRS, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE, Nanocellulose, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailored cationic PISA-latexes for strong adhesion to anionic surfaces: Importance of purity and chain-extension as shown by adsorption2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    Université de Lyon, Univ Lyon 1, CPE Lyon, CNRS UMR 5265, C2P2 (Chemistry, Catalysis, Polymers & Processes), LCPP, 69616 Villeurbanne, France .
    Lansalot, Muriel
    Université de Lyon, Univ Lyon 1, CPE Lyon, CNRS UMR 5265, C2P2 (Chemistry, Catalysis, Polymers & Processes), LCPP, 69616 Villeurbanne, France .
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. RISE.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tailoring adhesion of anionic surfaces using cationic PISA-latexes – towards tough nanocellulose materials in the wet state2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, p. 4287-4302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cationic latexes with Tgs ranging between −40 °C and 120 °C were synthesised using n-butyl acrylate (BA) and/or methyl methacrylate (MMA) as the core polymers. Reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) combined with polymerisation-induced self-assembly (PISA) allowed for in situ chain-extension of a cationic macromolecular RAFT agent (macroRAFT) of poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) (PDMAPMA), used as stabiliser in so-called surfactant-free emulsion polymerisation. The resulting narrowly distributed nanosized latexes adsorbed readily onto silica surfaces and to model surfaces of cellulose nanofibrils, as demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements. Adsorption to anionic surfaces increased when increasing ionic strength to 10 mM, indicating the influence of the polyelectrolyte effect exerted by the corona. The polyelectrolyte corona affected the interactions in the wet state, the stability of the latex and re-dispersibility after drying. The QCM-D measurements showed that a lower Tg of the core results in a more strongly interacting adsorbed layer at the solid–liquid interface, despite a comparable adsorbed mass, indicating structural differences of the investigated latexes in the wet state. The two latexes with Tg below room temperature (i.e. PBATg-40 and P(BA-co-MMA)Tg3) exhibited film formation in the wet state, as shown by AFM colloidal probe measurements. It was observed that P(BA-co-MMA)Tg3 latex resulted in the largest pull-off force, above 200 m Nm−1 after 120 s in contact. The strongest wet adhesion was achieved with PDMAPMA-stabilized latexes soft enough to allow for interparticle diffusion of polymer chains, and stiff enough to create a strong adhesive joint. Fundamental understanding of interfacial properties of latexes and cellulose enables controlled and predictive strategies to produce strong and tough materials with high nanocellulose content, both in the wet and dry state.

  • 17.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hatton, Fiona
    Loughborough Univ, Dept Mat, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Freire, Carmen
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Vilela, Carla
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Lo Re, Giada
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailored PISA-latexes for modification of nanocellulosics: Investigating compatibilizing and plasticizing effects2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Francon, Hugo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    3D printable nanocellulose aerogels via a green crosslinking approach and a facile evaporation procedure2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Maddalena, Lorenza
    et al.
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Tecnol, Alessandria Campus, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Gomez, Julio
    AVANZARE Innovac Tecnol SL, Navarrete 26370, La Rioja, Spain..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Fina, Alberto
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Tecnol, Alessandria Campus, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Tecnol, Alessandria Campus, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy..
    Polyelectrolyte-Assisted Dispersions of Reduced Graphite Oxide Nanoplates in Water and Their Gas-Barrier Application2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 36, p. 43301-43313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersion of graphene and related materials in water is needed to enable sustainable processing of these 2D materials. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) to stabilize reduced graphite oxide (rGO) dispersions in water. Atomic force microscopy colloidal probe measurements were carried out to investigate the interaction mechanisms between rGO and the polyelectrolytes (PEs). Our results show that for positive PEs, the interaction appears electrostatic, originating from the weak negative charge of graphene in water. For negative PEs, however, van der Waals forces may result in the formation of a PE shell on rGO. The PE-stabilized rGO dispersions were then used for the preparation of coatings to enhance gas barrier properties of polyethylene terephthalate films using the layer-by-layer self-assembly. Ten bilayers of rGO(BPEI)/rGO(PAA) resulted in coatings with excellent barrier properties as demonstrated by oxygen transmission rates below detection limits [<0.005 cm(3)/(m(2) day atm)]. The observed excellent performance is ascribed to both the high density of the deposited coating and its efficient stratification. These results can enable the design of highly efficient gas barrier solutions for demanding applications, including oxygen-sensitive pharmaceutical products or flexible electronic devices.

  • 20.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142, United States.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, F.
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Roth, Stephan Volkher
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ion-specific assembly of strong, tough, and stiff biofibers2019In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 58, no 51, p. 18562-18569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing engineering materials with high stiffness and high toughness is challenging as stiff materials tend to be brittle. Many biological materials realize this objective through multiscale (i.e., atomic- to macroscale) mechanisms that are extremely difficult to replicate in synthetic materials. Inspired from the architecture of such biological structures, we here present flow-assisted organization and assembly of renewable native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs), which yields highly anisotropic biofibers characterized by a unique combination of high strength (1010 MPa), high toughness (62 MJ m−3) and high stiffness (57 GPa). We observed that properties of the fibers are primarily governed by specific ion characteristics such as hydration enthalpy and polarizability. A fundamental facet of this study is thus to elucidate the role of specific anion binding following the Hofmeister series on the mechanical properties of wet fibrillar networks, and link this to the differences in properties of dry nanostructured fibers. This knowledge is useful for rational design of nanomaterials and is critical for validation of specific ion effect theories. The bioinspired assembly demonstrated here is relevant example for designing high-performance materials with absolute structural control.

  • 21.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Widhe, Mona
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Innventia AB, P.O. Box 5604, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ultrastrong and Bioactive Nanostructured Bio-Based Composites2017In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 5148-5159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature’s design of functional materials relies on smart combinations of simple components to achieve desired properties. Silk and cellulose are two clever examples from nature–spider silk being tough due to high extensibility, whereas cellulose possesses unparalleled strength and stiffness among natural materials. Unfortunately, silk proteins cannot be obtained in large quantities from spiders, and recombinant production processes are so far rather expensive. We have therefore combined small amounts of functionalized recombinant spider silk proteins with the most abundant structural component on Earth (cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs)) to fabricate isotropic as well as anisotropic hierarchical structures. Our approach for the fabrication of bio-based anisotropic fibers results in previously unreached but highly desirable mechanical performance with a stiffness of ∼55 GPa, strength at break of ∼1015 MPa, and toughness of ∼55 MJ m–3. We also show that addition of small amounts of silk fusion proteins to CNF results in materials with advanced biofunctionalities, which cannot be anticipated for the wood-based CNF alone. These findings suggest that bio-based materials provide abundant opportunities to design composites with high strength and functionalities and bring down our dependence on fossil-based resources.

  • 22.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wennmalm, Stefan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar
    Linköping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrköping, Sweden..
    Rolland, Nicolas
    Linköping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrköping, Sweden..
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Linköping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrköping, Sweden..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The structure of cellulose nanofibril networks at low concentrations and their stabilizing action on colloidal particles2022In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 297, p. 120046-, article id 120046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and dynamics of networks formed by rod-shaped particles can be indirectly investigated by measuring the diffusion of spherical tracer particles. This method was used to characterize cellulose nanofibril (CNF) networks in both dispersed and arrested states, the results of which were compared with coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. At a CNF concentration of 0.2 wt% a transition was observed where, below this concentration tracer diffusion is governed by the increasing macroscopic viscosity of the dispersion. Above 0.2 wt%, the diffusion of small particles (20-40 nm) remains viscosity controlled, while particles (100-500 nm) become trapped in the CNF network. Sedimentation of silica microparticles (1-5 mu m) in CNF dispersions was also determined, showing that sedimentation of larger particles is significantly affected by the presence of CNF. At concentrations of 0.2 wt%, the sedimentation velocity of 5 mu m particles was reduced by 99 % compared to pure water.

  • 23.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wennmalm, Stefan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Establishing the dynamic structure of cellulose nanofibril networks in dispersion and its unique stabilizing action on colloidal dispersionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, ITN, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, SE 60221, Sweden.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Khaliliazar, Shirin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Hailong
    Fysikum, Stockhohlm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Rapid prototyping of heterostructured organic microelectronics using wax printing, filtration, and transfer2021In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 14596-14605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    data set
  • 25.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 639798 Singapore.
    Maddalena, L.
    Avci, C.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ciftci, Göksu Cinar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Material and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Stockholm, 11486 Sweden.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, F.
    Akhtar, F.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, Shandong, 266100 China.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Shaping 90 wt% NanoMOFs into Robust Multifunctional Aerogels Using Tailored Bio-Based Nanofibrils2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 38, article id 2204800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid porous crystalline networks with tunable chemical and structural properties. However, their excellent potential is limited in practical applications by their hard-to-shape powder form, making it challenging to assemble MOFs into macroscopic composites with mechanical integrity. While a binder matrix enables hybrid materials, such materials have a limited MOF content and thus limited functionality. To overcome this challenge, nanoMOFs are combined with tailored same-charge high-aspect-ratio cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) to manufacture robust, wet-stable, and multifunctional MOF-based aerogels with 90 wt% nanoMOF loading. The porous aerogel architectures show excellent potential for practical applications such as efficient water purification, CO2 and CH4 gas adsorption and separation, and fire-safe insulation. Moreover, a one-step carbonization process enables these aerogels as effective structural energy-storage electrodes. This work exhibits the unique ability of high-aspect-ratio CNFs to bind large amounts of nanoMOFs in structured materials with outstanding mechanical integrity—a quality that is preserved even after carbonization. The demonstrated process is simple and fully discloses the intrinsic potential of the nanoMOFs, resulting in synergetic properties not found in the components alone, thus paving the way for MOFs in macroscopic multifunctional composites. 

  • 26.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Lahchaichi, Ekeram
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hall, Stephen A.
    Lund Univ, Div Solid Mech, Lund, Sweden..
    Riazanova, Anastasiia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ciftci, Göksu Cinar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hierarchical build-up of bio-based nanofibrous materials with tunable metal-organic framework biofunctionality2021In: Materials Today, ISSN 1369-7021, E-ISSN 1873-4103, Vol. 48, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multifunctional, light-weight, responsive materials show promise in a range of applications including soft robotics, therapeutic delivery, advanced diagnostics and charge storage. This paper presents a novel, scalable, efficient and sustainable approach for the preparation of cellulose nanofibril-based aerogels via a facile ice-templating, solvent exchange and air-drying procedure, which could replace existing inefficient drying processes. These ambient-dried aerogels (similar to 99% porosity) exhibit a high specific compressive modulus (26.8 +/- 6.1 kPa m(3) kg(-1), approaching equivalence of carbon-nanotubereinforced aerogels), wet stability and shape recovery (80-90%), favorable specific surface area (90 m(2) g(-1)) and tunable densities (2-20 kg m(-3)). The aerogels provide an ideal nanofibrillar substrate for in-situ growth of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), via co-assembly of MOF precursors with proteins in aqueous solutions. The resulting hybrid aerogels show a nine-fold increase in surface area (810 m(2)g(-1)), with preserved wet stability and additional protein biofunctionality. The hybrid aerogels facilitate a pH-controlled release of immobilized proteins, following a concomitant disassembly of the surface grown MOFs, demonstrating their use in controlled delivery systems. The colorimetric protein binding assay of the biofunctionalized hybrid aerogel also demonstrates the potential of the material as a novel 3D bioassay platform, which could potentially be an alternative to plate-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  • 27.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lillberg, Eric
    Vattenfall AB.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    All-Cellulose Superabsorbent HeterostructuresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, 11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hornification of cellulose-rich materials: A kinetically trapped state2023In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 318, article id 121132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental understanding concerning cellulose-cellulose interactions under wet and dry conditions remains unclear. This is especially true regarding the drying-induced association of cellulose, commonly described as an irreversible phenomenon called hornification. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms behind hornification would contribute to new drying techniques for cellulose-based materials in the pulp and paper industry while at the same time enhancing material properties and facilitating the recyclability of cellulose-rich materials. In the present work, the irreversible joining of cellulose-rich surfaces has been studied by subjecting cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films to different heat treatments to establish a link between reswelling properties, structural characteristics as well as chemical and mechanical analyses. A heating time/temperature dependence was observed for the reswelling of the CNF films, which is related to the extent of hornification and is different for different chemical compositions of the fibrils. Further, the results indicate that hornification is related to a diffusion process and that the reswellability increases very slowly over long time, indicating that equilibrium is not reached. Hence, hornification is suggested to be a kinetically limited phenomenon governed by non-covalent reversible interactions and a time/temperature dependence on their forming and breaking.

  • 29.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Unparalleled Performance of Uniaxial Nanofibril Hydrogel Actuators by Optimizing Fibril-Network RelationshipsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    Spiber AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widhe, Mona
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioactive composites of cellulose nanofibrils and recombinant silk proteins2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Walther, Andreas
    et al.
    Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Mat Res Ctr, Inst Macromol Chem, A3BMS Lab, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany.;Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Ctr Interact Mat & Bioinspired Technol, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany.;DFG Cluster Excellence Living Adapt & Energy Auto, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany..
    Lossada, Francisco
    Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Mat Res Ctr, Inst Macromol Chem, A3BMS Lab, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany.;Univ Freiburg, Freiburg Ctr Interact Mat & Bioinspired Technol, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kriechbaum, Konstantin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ikkala, Olli
    Aalto Univ, Dept Appl Phys, Mol Mat, Espoo 02150, Finland..
    Saito, Tsuguyuki
    Univ Tokyo, Grad Sch Agr & Life Sci, Dept Biomat Sci, Tokyo 1138657, Japan..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal .
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Best Practice for Reporting Wet Mechanical Properties of Nanocellulose-Based Materials2020In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 2536-2540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose-based materials and nanocomposites show extraordinary mechanical properties with high stiffness, strength, and toughness. Although the last decade has witnessed great progress in understanding the mechanical properties of these materials, a crucial challenge is to identify pathways to introduce high wet strength, which is a critical parameter for commercial applications. Because of the waterborne fabrication methods, nanocellulose-based materials are prone to swelling by both adsorption of moist air or liquid water. Unfortunately, there is currently no best practice on how to take the swelling into account when reporting mechanical properties at different relative humidity or when measuring the mechanical properties of fully hydrated materials. This limits and in parts fully prevents comparisons between different studies. We review current approaches and propose a best practice for measuring and reporting mechanical properties of wet nanocellulose-based materials, highlighting the importance of swelling and the correlation between mechanical properties and volume expansion.

  • 32.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Heasman, Patrick
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Li, Hailong
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden.
    Iakunkov, Artem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, 60174, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dynamic Networks of Cellulose Nanofibrils Enable Highly Conductive and Strong Polymer Gel Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 30, article id 2212806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tunable dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are utilized to prepare high-performance polymer gel electrolytes. By swelling an anisotropically dewatered, but never dried, CNF gel in acidic salt solutions, a highly sparse network is constructed with a fraction of CNFs as low as 0.9%, taking advantage of the very high aspect ratio and the ultra-thin thickness of the CNFs (micrometers long and 2–4 nm thick). These CNF networks expose high interfacial areas and can accommodate massive amounts of the ionic conductive liquid polyethylene glycol-based electrolyte into strong homogeneous gel electrolytes. In addition to the reinforced mechanical properties, the presence of the CNFs simultaneously enhances the ionic conductivity due to their excellent strong water-binding capacity according to computational simulations. This strategy renders the electrolyte a room-temperature ionic conductivity of 0.61 ± 0.12 mS cm−1 which is one of the highest among polymer gel electrolytes. The electrolyte shows superior performances as a separator for lithium iron phosphate half-cells in high specific capacity (161 mAh g−1 at 0.1C), excellent rate capability (5C), and cycling stability (94% capacity retention after 300 cycles at 1C) at 60 °C, as well as stable room temperature cycling performance and considerably improved safety compared with commercial liquid electrolyte systems.

  • 33.
    Wohlert, Malin
    et al.
    Division of Applied Mechanics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose and the role of hydrogen bonds: not in charge of everything2022In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the cellulose scientific community, hydrogen bonding is often used as the explanation for a large variety of phenomena and properties related to cellulose and cellulose based materials. Yet, hydrogen bonding is just one of several molecular interactions and furthermore is both relatively weak and sensitive to the environment. In this review we present a comprehensive examination of the scientific literature in the area, with focus on theory and molecular simulation, and conclude that the relative importance of hydrogen bonding has been, and still is, frequently exaggerated.

  • 34.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. NTU Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 639798 Singapore, Singapore.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hall, Stephen
    Lund University, Division of Solid Mechanics, Lund, Sweden.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    FSCN Research Center, Mid Sweden University, 851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Solidified water at room temperature hosting tailored fluidic channels by using highly anisotropic cellulose nanofibrils2024In: Materials Today Nano, E-ISSN 2588-8420, Vol. 26, article id 100476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly anisotropic cellulose nanofibrils can solidify liquid water, creating self-supporting structures by incorporating a tiny number of fibrils. These fibrillar hydrogels can contain as much as 99.99 wt% water. The structure and mechanical properties of fibrillar networks have so far not been completely understood, nor how they solidify the bulk water at such low particle concentrations. In this work, the mechanical properties of cellulose fibrillar hydrogels in the dilute regime from a wt% perspective have been studied, and an elastoplastic model describing the network structure and its mechanics is presented. A significant insight from this work is that the ability of the fibrils to solidify water is very dependent on particle stiffness and the number of contact points it can form in the network structure. The comparison between the experimental results and the theoretical model shows that the fibrillar networks in the dilute regime form via a non-stochastic process since the fibrils have the time and freedom to find contact points during network formation by translational and rotational diffusion. The formed, dilute fibrillar network deforms by sliding fibril contacts upon straining the network beyond its elastic limit. Our results also show that before macroscopic failure, the fibril contacts are restored once the load is released. The exceptional properties of this solidified water are exploited to host fluidic channels, allowing directed fluid transportation in water. Finally, the microfluidic channels formed in the hydrogels are tailored by the layer-by-layer technique to be interactive against external stimuli, a characteristic envisioned to be useful in biomedical applications.

  • 35.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    FSCN Research Center, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall 851 Sweden.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore.
    Elastoplastic behavior of anisotropic, physically crosslinked hydrogel networks comprising stiff, charged fibrils in an electrolyte2023In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 19, no 15, p. 2792-2800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibrillar hydrogels are remarkably stiff, low-density networks that can hold vast amounts of water. These hydrogels can easily be made anisotropic by orienting the fibrils using different methods. Unlike the detailed and established descriptions of polymer gels, there is no coherent theoretical framework describing the elastoplastic behavior of fibrillar gels, especially concerning anisotropy. In this work, the swelling pressures of anisotropic fibrillar hydrogels made from cellulose nanofibrils were measured in the direction perpendicular to the fibril alignment. This experimental data was used to develop a model comprising three mechanical elements representing the network and the osmotic pressure due to non-ionic and ionic surface groups on the fibrils. At low solidity, the stiffness of the hydrogels was dominated by the ionic swelling pressure governed by the osmotic ingress of water. Fibrils with different functionality show the influence of aspect ratio, chemical functionality, and the remaining amount of hemicelluloses. This general model describes physically crosslinked hydrogels comprising fibrils with high flexural rigidity - that is, with a persistence length larger than the mesh size. The experimental technique is a framework to study and understand the importance of fibrillar networks for the evolution of multicellular organisms, like plants, and the influence of different components in plant cell walls.

  • 36.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Advanced characterization of nanocelluloses and their dispersions - linked to final material properties2024Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 36 of 36
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