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  • 1.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose nanocomposites - Controlling dispersion and material properties through nanocellulose surface modification2015In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of cellulosic nanofibers as reinforcement in polymer composites offers great advantages over their petroleum counterparts. Apart from being strong, stiff and low density; they are obtained from naturally occurring resources and as such are favorable from an environmental point of view. A major problem while studying nanomaterials is their tendency to agglomerate, thus leading to inhomogeneous distribution within the polymer matrix. This often results in stress concentrations in the matrix rich regions when the material is subjected to load and therefore, limits the potential application of these materials. A common approach to circumvent this is by surface modification, which facilitates the dispersion in non-polar matrices. An environmental friendly approach, inspired by clay chemistry, was used to functionalize the CNC surface. It was shown that the CNC could be modified in a rather convenient way to attach a variety of functional groups on the surface. Primarily, the problem of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) distribution in a hydrophobic polymer matrix is investigated. Composites prepared from modified CNC were studied and compared with unmodified CNC. The distribution of the CNC is carefully monitored at different stages via UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the resulting materials were characterized by dynamic mechanical as well as uniaxial tensile tests. It was shown that a homogeneous distribution of the CNC exposes a tremendous amount of surface area to interact with the matrix. In such a case, the stress transfer is much more efficient and perhaps, the matrix behavior is modified, which leads to significant improvements in the mechanical properties.

  • 2.
    Medina, Lilian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ansari, Farhan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Carosio, Federico
    Salajkova, Michaela
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites from Clay, Cellulose Nanofibrils, and Epoxy with Improved Moisture Stability for Coatings and Semi-Structural Applications2019In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of high reinforcement content clay-cellulose-thermoset nanocomposite was proposed, where epoxy precursors diffused into a wet porous clay-nanocellulose mat, followed by curing. The processing concept was scaled to > 200 µm thickness composites, the mechanical properties were high for nanocomposites and the materials showed better tensile properties at 90% RH compared with typical nanocellulose materials. The nanostructure and phase distributions were studied using transmission electron microscopy; Young’s modulus, yield strength, ultimate strength and ductility were determined as well as moisture sorption, fire retardancy and oxygen barrier properties. Clay and cellulose contents were varied, as well as the epoxy content. Epoxy had favorable effects on moisture stability, and also improved reinforcement effects at low reinforcement content. More homogeneous nano- and mesoscale epoxy distribution is still required for further property improvements. The materials constitute a new type of three-phase nanocomposites, of interest as coatings, films and as laminated composites for semi-structural applications.

  • 3.
    Morimune-Moriya, Seira
    et al.
    Chubu Univ, Coll Engn, Dept Appl Chem, Matsumoto, Nagano 4878501, Japan..
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nishino, Takashi
    Kobe Univ, Grad Sch Engn, Dept Chem Sci & Engn, Kobe, Hyogo 6578501, Japan..
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Reinforcement Effects from Nanodiamond in Cellulose Nanofibril Films2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 2423-2431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research on nanopaper structures from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) is well established, the mechanical behavior is not well understood, especially not when CNF is combined with hard nanoparticles. Cationic CNF (Q-CNF) was prepared and successfully decorated by anionic nanodiamond (ND) nanoparticles in hydrocolloidal form. The Q-CNF/ND nanocomposites were filtered from a hydrocolloid and dried. Unlike many other carbon nano composites, the QCNF/ND nanocomposites were optically transparent. Reinforcement effects from the nanodiamond were remarkable, such as Young's modulus (9.8 -> 16.6 GPa) and tensile strength (209.5 -> 277.5 MPa) at a content of only 1.9% v/v of ND, and the reinforcement mechanisms are discussed. Strong effects on CNF network deformation mechanisms were revealed by loading unloading experiments. Scratch hardness also increased strongly with increased addition of ND.

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