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  • 1.
    Carl, Lind
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Rose, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Development and evaluation of RAMP I – apractitioner’s tool for screening of musculoskeletaldisorder risk factors in manual handling2019In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE), Vol. 25, no 2, p. 165-180, article id 10.1080/10803548.2017.1364458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RAMP I is a screening tool developed to support practitioners in screening for work-related musculoskeletal disorder riskfactors related to manual handling. RAMP I, which is part of the RAMP tool, is based on research-based studies combinedwith expert group judgments. More than 80 practitioners participated in the development of RAMP I. The tool consistsof dichotomous assessment items grouped into seven categories. Acceptable reliability was found for a majority of theassessment items for 15 practitioners who were given 1 h of training. The usability evaluation points to RAMP I beingusable for screening for musculoskeletal disorder risk factors, i.e., usable for assessing risks, being usable as a decision base,having clear results and that the time needed for an assessment is acceptable. It is concluded that RAMP I is a usable toolfor practitioners.

  • 2.
    Dahlqvist, Camilla
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Nordander, Catarina
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Enquist, Henrik
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Self-recordings of upper arm elevation during cleaning - comparison between analyses using a simplified reference posture and a standard reference posture2018In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, article id 402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To reduce ergonomic risk factors in terms of awkward and constrained postures and high velocities, it is important to perform adequate risk assessments. Technical methods provide objective measures of physical workload. These methods have so far mainly been used by researchers. However, if written instructions how to apply the sensors and how to adopt the reference posture are provided, together with triaxial accelerometers, it may be possible for employees to record their own physical workload. The exposure in terms of e.g. upper arm elevations could then easily be assessed for all workers in a workplace. The main aims of this study were: 1) to compare analyses for self-recording of upper arm elevation during work using a simplified reference posture versus using a standard reference posture, and 2) to compare the two reference postures.MethodsTwenty-eight cleaners attached an accelerometer to their dominant upper arm and adopted a simplified reference according to a written instruction. They were thereafter instructed by a researcher to adopt a standard reference. Upper arm elevations were recorded for 2 or 3 days. Each recording was analysed twice; relative to the simplified reference posture and relative to the standard reference posture. The group means of the differences in recorded upper arm elevations between simplified and standard reference analyses were assessed using Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Furthermore, we calculated the group mean of the differences between the simplified reference posture and the standard reference posture.ResultsFor arm elevation during work (50(th) percentile), the group mean of the differences between the two analyses was 0.2 degrees (range-7 - 10 degrees). The group mean of the differences between the two references was 9 degrees (range 1-21 degrees). The subjects were able to follow the instructions in the protocol and performed self-recording of upper arm elevation and velocity.ConclusionsThe small difference between the two analyses indicates that recordings performed by employees themselves are comparable, on a group level, with those performed by researchers. Self-recordings in combination with action levels would provide employers with a method for risk assessment as a solid basis for prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  • 3.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    et al.
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Richter, Hans O.
    Univ Gavle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Occupat & Publ Hlth Sci, Ctr Musculoskeletal Res, S-80176 Gavle, Sweden..
    Effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on trapezius muscle activity during computer mouse work2019In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 389-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to identify whether or not an increase in ciliary-muscle contraction force, when the eye-lens is adjusted for viewing at a near distance, results in an increase in trapezius muscle activity, while performing a natural work task. Twelve participants, ranging in age from 21 to 32years, performed a computer-mouse work task during free gaze conditions. A moving visual target was tracked with a computer mouse on a screen placed at two different distances from the eyes, 25cm and 50cm. Tracking performance, eye accommodation, and bilateral trapezius muscle activity were measured continuously. Ciliary-muscle contraction force was computed according to a formula which takes into account the age-dependent, non-linear relationship between the contraction force of the ciliary muscle and the produced level of eye accommodation. Generalized estimating equations analyses were performed. On the dominant hand side and for the nearest screen distance, there was a significant effect of ciliary-muscle contraction force on the trapezius muscle activity (p<0.001). No other effects were significant (p>0.05). The results support the hypothesis that high visual demands, during computer mouse work, increase ciliary muscle contraction force and contribute to a raise of the sustained level of trapezius muscle activity. The current study specifically clarifies the validity of the relationship between ciliary-muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity and demonstrates that this relationship is not due to a general personality trait. We conclude that a high level of ciliary muscle contraction force can contribute to a development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area.

  • 4.
    Grooten, Wilhelmus Johannes Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Allied Hlth Profess Funct, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hansson, Amanda
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Allied Hlth Profess Funct, Funct Area Occupat Therapy & Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Kjellberg, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Toomingas, Allan
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mueller, Mira
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ang, Björn Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Dalarna, Falun, Sweden..
    Non-participation in initial and repeated health risk appraisals - a drop-out analysis based on a health project2019In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundHealth risk assessment (HRAs) are commonly used by occupational health services (OHS) to aid workplaces in keeping their employees healthy, but for unknown reasons, many employees choose not to participate in the HRAs. The aim of the study was to explore whether demographic, lifestyle and health-related factors in employees are associated with non-participation in initial and repeated HRAs.MethodsIn an OHS-based health project, 2022 municipal employees were asked to participate in three repeated HRAs. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used so as to determine associations between non-participating and demographic, lifestyle and health-related factors (e.g. biomarkers).ResultsAmong the employees who were asked to participate in the health project, more than half did not participate in any HRA and among those who did, more than one third did not participate in repeated HRAs. Young age, male sex and being employed in the Technical department or Health and Social Care department in comparison with being employed in the department for Childcare and Education were factors significantly associated with non-participation in the initial HRA. These factors, together with being on sick leave and having unhealthy dietary habits, were factors associated with non-participation in repeated HRAs.ConclusionsAmong the non-participators in initial HRAs and in repeated HRAs younger men and those already related to ill-health were overrepresented. This implicates that health care providers to a higher extent should focus on those most needed and that employers should be more engaged in results of repeated HRA's. Future studies should focus on modifiable variables that could make the HRAs more attractive and inclusive.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Teresia
    Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden..
    Continuous lean development in industrial process work: Implications for physical workload and pain in the neck and upper extremitiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Institutet.
    Mahdavian, Nafise
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.(User Centred Product Design) .
    Högberg, Dan
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.(User Centred Product Design) .
    Hanson, Lars
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Scania CV, Södertälje, Sweden.(User Centred Product Design).
    Diaz Olivares, Jose Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SWEDEN.
    Prevention of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Using Smart Workwear – The Smart Workwear Consortium2019In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing: International Conference on Human Systems Engineering and Design: Future Trends and Applications: Human Systems Engineering and Design / [ed] Ahram T., Karwowski W., Taiar R, Switzerland: Springer, 2019, p. 477-483Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adverse work-related physical exposures such as repetitive movements and awkward postures have negative health effects and lead to large financial costs. To address these problems, a multi-disciplinary consortium was formed with the aim of developing an ambulatory system for recording and analyzing risks for musculoskeletal disorders utilizing textile integrated sensors as part of the regular workwear. This paper presents the consortium, the Smart Workwear System, and a case study illustrating its potential to decrease adverse biomechanical exposure by promoting improved work technique.

  • 7.
    Lu, Ke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 1, 171 77 Solna, Sweden.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Seoane, F.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 1, 171 77 Solna, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 1, 171 77 Solna, Sweden.
    Lindecrantz, K.
    Fusion of heart rate, respiration and motion measurements from a wearable sensor system to enhance energy expenditure estimation2018In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 3092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new method that integrates heart rate, respiration, and motion information obtained from a wearable sensor system to estimate energy expenditure. The system measures electrocardiography, impedance pneumography, and acceleration from upper and lower limbs. A multilayer perceptron neural network model was developed, evaluated, and compared to two existing methods, with data from 11 subjects (mean age, 27 years, range, 21–65 years) who performed a 3-h protocol including submaximal tests, simulated work tasks, and periods of rest. Oxygen uptake was measured with an indirect calorimeter as a reference, with a time resolution of 15 s. When compared to the reference, the new model showed a lower mean absolute error (MAE = 1.65 mL/kg/min, R2 = 0.92) than the two existing methods, i.e., the flex-HR method (MAE = 2.83 mL/kg/min, R2 = 0.75), which uses only heart rate, and arm-leg HR+M method (MAE = 2.12 mL/kg/min, R2 = 0.86), which uses heart rate and motion information. As indicated, this new model may, in combination with a wearable system, be useful in occupational and general health applications. 

  • 8. Mahdavian, N.
    et al.
    Lind, Carl Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Institutet.
    Diaz Olivares, Jose Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Pascual, Aitor
    Högberg, D.
    Brolin, E.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Hanson, L.
    Effect of giving feedback on postural working techniques2018In: Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, IOS Press, 2018, Vol. 8, p. 247-252Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working postures and movements affect work efficiency and musculoskeletal health. To reduce the biomechanical exposure in physically demanding settings, working techniques may be improved by giving instant ergonomic feedback to the operator. This study investigates if feedback can be used to decrease adverse postures and movements in assembly work. A prototype solution of a smart textile workwear was used on a trainee assembly line. Posture and movement signals of 24 trainee operators were sampled via the workwear, transferred to a tablet for analyses and used to provide feedback suggesting improvements of work technique. Two modes of feedback were tested. Every participant’s work technique was measured before and after receiving the feedback and the results were compared. For upper arm elevation angle ≥60°, behaviour change is indicated, supporting a positive work technique change, and indicated a future usefulness of technical automatic feedback for operators.

  • 9.
    Vega-Barbas, Mario
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Solnavagen 1, S-17177 Solna, Sweden.
    Diaz-Olivares, Jose A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Lu, Ke
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Solnavagen 1, S-17177 Solna, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Solnavagen 1, S-17177 Solna, Sweden.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Halsovagen 7, S-14157 Huddinge, Sweden.;Univ Boras, Swedish Sch Text, Allegatan 1, S-50190 Boras, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept & T Biomed Engn, S-17176 Solna, Sweden..
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Solnavagen 1, S-17177 Solna, Sweden.
    P-Ergonomics Platform: Toward Precise, Pervasive, and Personalized Ergonomics using Wearable Sensors and Edge Computing2019In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 19, no 5, article id 1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventive healthcare has attracted much attention recently. Improving people's lifestyles and promoting a healthy diet and wellbeing are important, but the importance of work-related diseases should not be undermined. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are among the most common work-related health problems. Ergonomists already assess MSD risk factors and suggest changes in workplaces. However, existing methods are mainly based on visual observations, which have a relatively low reliability and cover only part of the workday. These suggestions concern the overall workplace and the organization of work, but rarely includes individuals' work techniques. In this work, we propose a precise and pervasive ergonomic platform for continuous risk assessment. The system collects data from wearable sensors, which are synchronized and processed by a mobile computing layer, from which exposure statistics and risk assessments may be drawn, and finally, are stored at the server layer for further analyses at both individual and group levels. The platform also enables continuous feedback to the worker to support behavioral changes. The deployed cloud platform in Amazon Web Services instances showed sufficient system flexibility to affordably fulfill requirements of small to medium enterprises, while it is expandable for larger corporations. The system usability scale of 76.6 indicates an acceptable grade of usability.

  • 10.
    Wells, Antonia C.
    et al.
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Surg, Cambridge, England..
    Kjellman, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Harper, Simon J. F.
    Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Surg, Cambridge, England..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallbeck, M. Susan
    Mayo Clin, Hlth Sci Res, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA..
    Operating hurts: a study of EAES surgeons2019In: Surgical Endoscopy, ISSN 0930-2794, E-ISSN 1432-2218, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 933-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWork-related pain and discomfort experienced by surgeons is widely reported in the literature. A survey was, therefore, conducted to explore this issue among members of the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES).MethodsThe survey was emailed to 2980 EAES members in 2017 enquiring about their working practice, musculoskeletal (MSK) pain and burnout.ResultsA total of 569 (19%) surgeons responded, of whom 556 were practicing surgeons; 86% were consultants, 84% were male, and 94% were right-handed. Respondents operated on average 3.3days/week with 27% of their procedures lasting longer than 3h. The 386 endoscopists surveyed reported performing an average of 5.3 procedures/day with 83% performing endoscopy at least once per week. Over half of practicing surgeons (62%) reported their worst pain score was 3 or higher (10-point scale) in the past 7 working days, encompassing 71% of their open, 72% laparoscopic, 48% robot-assisted cases and 52% of their endoscopies. Of the 120 surgeons who had ever sought medical help for aches, pain or discomfort, 38% were currently in pain and 16% had considered leaving surgery due to their MSK pain, 26% had reported work-related pain to their employer, 26% had been on short-term disability during their career and 4% long-term disability due to MSK disorders. A significant proportion of the respondents (49%) felt their physical discomfort would influence the ability to perform or assist with surgical procedures in the future. These surgeons reported significantly lower satisfaction from their work (p=0.024), higher burnout (p=0.005) and significantly higher callousness toward people (p<0.001) than those not fearing loss of career longevity.ConclusionThe results show that MSK pain is prevalent amongst EAES members. Nearly half the respondents had career longevity fears from pain/discomfort which, in turn, correlated with more prevalent feelings of burnout. More emphasis should be placed on the aetiology, prevention and management of musculoskeletal pain in the surgical workforce.

  • 11.
    Yang, Liyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgström, D.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Validation and comparison of three positioning protocols of inertial measurement units for measuring trunk movement2019In: 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, IEA 2018, Springer, 2019, p. 205-211Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postures and movements of the trunk are of ergonomic concern when evaluating the risks at work. Technical measurement methods can be used for measurements of trunk movements for long duration with high accuracy, and are therefore increasingly used in practice and research. However, currently there is no standardized protocol for the sensor placement for trunk measurement. Three placement protocols of inertial measurement units (IMUs), including placement on C7, T4 and sternum (St), in combination with S1 spinous process, were compared with an optical motion capture (OMC) system. Four subjects performed a movement test including forward to backward bending, sideward bending and twisting of the trunk, and a symmetrical lifting task. Root-mean-square differences (RMSDs) and Pearson’s correlation were calculated between the two systems. For the movement tests, the RMSDs of the forward inclination at the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles from the three IMUs were all smaller than 7.3°. Larger differences were shown for C7 of the sideward inclination at 90th percentile (10.8°). Also for the twisting, larger differences were shown, especially for C7-S1 and T4-S1 (RMSD = 16.5° and 19.8°). For the lifting tests of forward inclination, St had the smallest differences compared to OMC (RMSDs &lt; 4.1°), while slightly larger errors were found for C7 and T4 at the 90th percentile (RMSDs = 8.1° and 8.2°). Different positioning protocols seem to have a slightly different effect on the measurement accuracy of trunk movement. Considerations should be taken when comparing results across studies applying different protocols.

  • 12.
    Yang, Liyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Diaz-Olivares, Jose A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Univ Boras, Swedish Sch Text, S-50190 Boras, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, S-14157 Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Biomed Engn, S-14157 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Boras, Swedish Sch Text, S-50190 Boras, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. nstitute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Eklund, Jörgen A. E.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Towards Smart Work Clothing for Automatic Risk Assessment of Physical Workload2018In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 6, p. 40059-40072Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related musculoskeletal and cardiovascular disorders are still prevalent in today's working population. Nowadays, risk assessments are usually performed via self-reports or observations, which have relatively low reliability. Technology developments in textile electrodes (textrodes), inertial measurement units, and the communication and processing capabilities of smart phones/tablets provide wearable solutions that enable continuous measurements of physiological and musculoskeletal loads at work with sufficient reliability and resource efficiency. In this paper, a wearable system integrating textrodes, motion sensors, and real-time data processing through a mobile application was developed as a demonstrator of risk assessment related to different types and levels of workload and activities. The system was demonstrated in eight subjects from four occupations with various workload intensities, during which the heart rate and leg motion data were collected and analyzed with real-time risk assessment and feedback. The system showed good functionality and usability as a risk assessment tool. The results contribute to designing and developing future wearable systems and bring new solutions for the prevention of work-related disorders.

  • 13.
    Yang, Liyun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. IMM, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. IMM, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Ekblom, Örjan
    GIH, The Swedish School of Sport and Health.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Evaluation of physiological workload assessment methods using heart rate and accelerometry for a smart wearable system2019In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work metabolism (WM) can be accurately estimated by oxygen consumption (VO2), which is commonly assessed by heart rate (HR) in field studies. However, the VO2–HR relationship is influenced by individual capacity and activity characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three models for estimating WM compared with indirect calorimetry, during simulated work activities. The techniques were: the HR-Flex model; HR branched model, combining HR with hip-worn accelerometers (ACC); and HR + arm-leg ACC model, combining HR with wrist- and thigh-worn ACC. Twelve participants performed five simulated work activities and three submaximal tests. The HR + arm-leg ACC model had the overall best performance with limits of agreement (LoA) of −3.94 and 2.00 mL/min/kg, while the HR-Flex model had −5.01 and 5.36 mL/min/kg and the branched model, −6.71 and 1.52 mL/min/kg. In conclusion, the HR + arm-leg ACC model should, when feasible, be preferred in wearable systems for WM estimation.

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