Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bhusal, Jagat K.
    et al.
    Chapagain, Prem Sagar
    Regmi, Santosh
    Gurung, Praju
    Zulkafli, Zed
    Karpouzoglou, Timothy
    Pandeya, Bhopal
    Buytaert, Wouter
    Clark, Julian
    Mountains Under Pressure: Evaluating Ecosystem Services and Livelihoods in the Upper Himalayan Region of Nepal2016In: International Journal of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 217-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural resource-based livelihoods in mountainous regions are subject to new types of development as well as climate related pressures and vulnerabilities. On one hand, the integrity of the mountainous landscape is under pressure from the melting of glaciers, changes in water availability, rainfall patterns, and soil degradation. On the other hand, as mountainous environments become increasingly more important in national growth strategies and development priorities, new avenues for livelihoods and vulnerabilities become more pronounced. Climate change effects are expected to be disproportionately higher in mountainous regions. There is therefore a critical urgency to better comprehend these changes shaping mountainous environments and to better assess future direct and indirect impacts on ecosystem services and livelihoods. This article presents the results of an analysis of ecosystem services and livelihoods in the Upper Mustang region of Nepal. The region was selected for its particular trans-Himalayan location, development diversity, and climatic changes that have placed increasing pressure on local ecosystem services. We examine the central role of ecosystem services for remote mountain regions, particularly for the poor, the existing pressures on the key ecosystem services and local ways of adapting to climate-induced effect to ecosystem services and, cogeneration of the knowledge gaps and co-production of knowledge with communities to support local adaptation strategies. We adopted a combination of qualitative and quantitative analytical approaches. We found significant implications for local livelihoods and adaptation strategies with reference to water for farming, pasture productivity and livestock rearing, as well as tourism development. Additionally, we highlight knowledge gaps in assessing ecosystem services and opportunities for local monitoring that may close in on the gaps with an end goal of overcoming poverty.

  • 2. Dewulf, Art
    et al.
    Karpouzoglou, Timos
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Warner, Jeroen
    Wesselink, Anna
    Mao, Feng
    Vos, Jeroen
    Tamas, Peter
    Groot, Annemarie E.
    Heijmans, Annelies
    Ahmed, Farhana
    Hoang, Long
    Vij, Sumit
    Buytaert, Wouter
    The power to define resilience in social–hydrological systems: Toward a power-sensitive resilience framework2019In: WIREs Water, ISSN 0935-879X, E-ISSN 2049-1948, article id e1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Since the early work on defining and analyzing resilience in domains such as engineering, ecology and psychology, the concept has gained significant traction in many fields of research and practice. It has also become a very powerful justification for various policy goals in the water sector, evident in terms like flood resilience, river resilience, and water resilience. At the same time, a substantial body of literature has developed that questions the resilience concept's systems ontology, natural science roots and alleged conservatism, and criticizes resilience thinking for not addressing power issues. In this study, we review these critiques with the aim to develop a framework for power-sensitive resilience analysis. We build on the three faces of power to conceptualize the power to define resilience. We structure our discussion of the relevant literature into five questions that need to be reflected upon when applying the resilience concept to social?hydrological systems. These questions address: (a) resilience of what, (b) resilience at what scale, (c) resilience to what, (d) resilience for what purpose, and (e) resilience for whom; and the implications of the political choices involved in defining these parameters for resilience building or analysis. Explicitly considering these questions enables making political choices explicit in order to support negotiation or contestation on how resilience is defined and used. This article is categorized under: Human Water > Water Governance. Engineering Water > Planning Water.

  • 3.
    Grainger, Sam
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, Grantham Inst Climate Change & Environm, London, England.;Univ Leeds, Sch Earth & Environm, Sustainabil Res Inst, Leeds LS2 9JT, W Yorkshire, England..
    Hommes, Lena
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Water Resources Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. Wageningen Univ & Res, Publ Adm & Policy Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Perez, Katya
    Consortium Sustainable Dev Andean Ecoreg CONDESAN, Lima, Peru..
    Buytaert, Wouter
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, Grantham Inst Climate Change & Environm, London, England..
    Dewulf, Art
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Publ Adm & Policy Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    The development and intersection of highland-coastal scale frames: a case study of water governance in central Peru2019In: JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & PLANNING, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 373-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scale framing makes an important difference to how complex environmental policy issues are defined and understood by different groups of actors. Increasing urban water demand and uncertain future climatic conditions in the Andes present major water governance challenges for the coastal regions of Peru. An understudied dimension of Peruvian water governance is how scale framing shapes the way problems are defined, and solutions are pursued. Here, we aim to strengthen the understanding of scale framing as it relates to highland-coastal interactions in central Peru between 2004 and 2015. By analysing this period of significant water governance reforms, we identify five prominent water-related frame dimensions and three differently scaled policy storylines and reveal how they developed and intersected over time. The storylines, supported by particular visualisations, either foreground 'urbanshed'-level investment in water supply infrastructure, community-level cultural restoration for improved local agricultural production, or nationwide watershed-level financial mechanisms for highland ecosystem conservation. Our study shows how the intersection of these storylines at different moments during the policy process often had a strengthening effect, creating a coalition of actors who were then able to generate sufficient momentum and support within the Peruvian government for the implementation of conservation-based watershed investments.

  • 4. Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Barron, Jennie
    Wageningen University, Post Box 8130, Wageningen, 6700EW, Netherlands; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Kräftriket 2B, Stockholm, SE106 91, Sweden.
    A global and regional perspective of rainwater harvesting in sub-Saharan Africa's rainfed farming systems2014In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 72-75, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In semi-arid and sub-humid sub-Saharan Africa highly variable rainfall, frequent droughts and low water productivity are consistently undermining food security. Rainwater harvesting technologies (RWHTs) help utilise water more productively whilst raising yield levels. In this article it is argued that realising the potential of RWHTs for resilience building and climate adaptation requires a better understanding of global and regional processes influencing RWHTs adoption combined with pre-existing analysis at the household scale. On the basis of a systematic literature review, processes of influence in the diffusion and uptake of RWHTs are identified. These relate to shifting ideology associated with food production systems; the scope of investments in agriculture science and technology; emergent actors shaping development assistance; and patterns of farmer mobility. Drawing insights from theory on transformations for sustainability and development, this article adds to the understanding of connectedness between farm-level adoption of RWHTs, and regional to global level actors, institutions and processes.

  • 5.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Dewulf, Art
    Clark, Julian
    Advancing adaptive governance of social-ecological systems through theoretical multiplicity2016In: Environmental Science & Policy, Vol. 57, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been rising scientific and policy interest in the adaptive governance of social- ecological systems. A systematic literature review of adaptive governance research during the period 2005–2014, demonstrates a vibrant debate taking place that spans a variety of empirical and theoretical approaches. The particular strength of adaptive governance is that it provides a theoretical lens for research that combines the analyses of novel governance capacities such as adaptive capacity, collaboration, scaling, knowledge and learning. As a way to give greater depth and analytical rigour to future studies over the next decade and beyond, we highlight the added value of theoretical multiplicity (i.e., focusing on the combination of theories to address complex problems). We argue that theoretical multiplicity can encourage stronger synergies between adaptive governance and other theoretical approaches and can help address epistemologically grey areas in adaptive governance scholarship, such as power and politics, inclusion and equity, short term and long term change, the relationship between public policy and adaptive governance.

  • 6.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Marshall, Fiona
    Mehta, Lyla
    Towards a peri-urban political ecology of water quality decline2018In: Land Use Policy, Vol. 70, no November 2017, p. 485-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have witnessed an expanding body of peri-urban and urban scholarship. However, recent scho- larship has yet to adequately address the central role of politics and power shaping water quality decline. The article focuses on the trans-Hindon region which is part of Ghaziabad city, close to India’s capital, Delhi. We draw upon urban political ecology and peri-urban scholarship to explain the role of politics and power shaping water quality decline. We argue in favour of creating stronger synergy between peri-urban and UPE debates as part of conceptualizing water quality decline. The article shows that as a complex socio-political challenge, water quality decline is centrally shaped by the intensifying linkages between urban and peri-urban forms of development and as a result deserves central attention as part of both these debates.

  • 7.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Pereira, Laura M
    Bridging ICTs with governance capabilities for food – energy – water sustainability2017In: Food, Energy and Water Sustainability Emergent Governance Strategies, London & New York: Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Tri, V A N Pham Dang
    Ahmed, Farhana
    Warner, Jeroen
    Hoang, Long
    Unearthing the ripple effects of power and resilience in large river deltas2019In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 98, no March 2018, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, flood resilience in large river deltas has been strongly tied to institutional and infrastructural interventions to manage flood risk (such as building of embankments and drainage structures). However, the introduction of infrastructural works has inevitably brought unforeseen, major consequences, such as biodiversity and accelerated land subsidence, endangering the fertile characteristics that made them interesting places to live in in the first place. These ripple effects have sparked, a reconsideration of what deltas are, questioning the very separation and control between nature and culture, and how deltas are to be dealt with. These effects have further sparked changing modalities of power that tend to be overlooked by delta and resilience scholars alike. As a result, there is a real risk that future interventions to increase resilience, will in fact amplify unequal power relations in deltas as opposed to alleviating them. If the system as a whole has achieved some level of flood resilience (partly due to the flood defence mechanisms in place), does infrastructure have a differential effect on people's mobility under flood conditions? Are some groups experiencing less rather than more security, as water accumulates in some places but not others? This paper presents theoretical insights on the relationship between power and resilience in delta regions supported by two case studies, the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta in Bangladesh and the Mekong delta in Vietnam.

  • 9.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Vij, Sumit
    Waterscape: a perspective for understanding the contested geography of water2017In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The waterscape is a perspective that has captured the imagination of diverse scholars interested in the interaction of water and society. This includes the way water travels in time and space and is shaped by culture and geography. In this article, we pay particular attention to the study of the waterscape in the political ecology tradition. Scholars following this tradition have placed strong emphasis on understanding the role of power and the contested nature of water in diverse rural, urban, and periurban landscapes. The article provides a brief account of the main strands of literature and serves the purpose of an introductory overview of the waterscape for beginners. We focus both on major works that have helped define the waterscape as a perspective in political ecology and recent studies on the role of unequal power and gender relationships, informal water practices, and local water flows such as ponds and wastewater.

  • 10.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Zimmer, Anna
    Ways of knowing the wastewaterscape: Urban political ecology and the politics of wastewater in Delhi, India2016In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Habitat International, Vol. 54, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of waterscape has been proposed by urban political ecology (UPE) scholars as a conceptual lens for understanding urban hydro-social flows. So far, however, there has been little attention by UPE scholars to the importance of wastewater in urban waterscapes. This study demonstrates how wastewater is embedded in an arena of social relations of power, defined in this article as the wastewaterscape. Drawing on research conducted in Delhi, the aim of the study is to examine re-occurring problems of wastewater disposal and mismanagement through the lens of knowledge; and the different ways of knowing about wastewater which exist amongst inhabitants of an informal settlement, scientific experts and municipal workers in Delhi. On the basis of our analysis, we argue that the systemic exposure of poorer urban citizens to untreated wastewater cannot be attributed to the shortcomings of service delivery alone, but is more fundamentally associated with how legitimacy is awarded to competing systems of knowledge about wastewater in the urban sphere.

  • 11.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Zulkafli, Zed
    Grainger, Sam
    Dewulf, Art
    Buytaert, Wouter
    Hannah, David M
    Environmental Virtual Observatories (EVOs): prospects for knowledge co-creation and resilience in the Information Age2016In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 18, p. 40-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments in technologies are shaping information access globally. This presents opportunities and challenges for understanding the role of new technologies in sustainability research. This article focuses on a suite of technologies termed Environmental Virtual Observatories (EVOs) developed for communicating observations and simulation of environmental processes. A strength of EVOs is that they are open and decentralised, thus democratising flow and ownership of information between multiple actors. However, EVOs are discussed rarely beyond their technical aspects. By evaluating the evolution of EVOs, we illustrate why it is timely to engage with policy and societal aspects as well. While first generation EVOs are primed for scientists, second generation EVOs can have broader implications for knowledge co-creation and resilience through their participatory design.

  • 12.
    Karpouzoglou, Timos
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mao, Feng
    What lies ahead? The future of Earth and Society as an adaptive system.2018In: Climate Changes in the Holocene: Impacts and Human Adaptation / [ed] Eustathios Chiotis, London: CRC Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Karpouzoglou, Timothy
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Reconciling equity and resilience of food systems in major river deltas of South East Asia2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Pandeya, B.
    et al.
    Buytaert, W.
    Zulkafli, Z.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Mao, F.
    Hannah, D.M.
    A comparative analysis of ecosystem services valuation approaches for application at the local scale and in data scarce regions2016In: Ecosystem Services, Vol. 22, no November 2015, p. 250-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant advances in the development of the ecosystem services concept across the science and policy arenas, the valuation of ecosystem services to guide sustainable development remains challenging, especially at a local scale and in data scarce regions. In this paper, we review and compare major past and current valuation approaches and discuss their key strengths and weaknesses for guiding policy decisions. To deal with the complexity of methods used in different valuation approaches, our review uses multiple entry points: data vs simulation, habitat vs system vs place-based, specific vs entire portfolio, local vs regional scale, and monetary vs non-monetary. We find that although most valuation approaches are useful to explain ecosystem services at a macro/system level, an application of locally relevant valuation approaches, which allows for a more integrated valuation relevant to decision making is still hindered by data-scarcity. The advent of spatially explicit policy support systems shows particular promise to make the best use of available data and simulations. Data collection remains crucial for the local scale and in data scarce regions. Leveraging citizen science-based data and knowledge co-generation may support the integrated valuation, while at the same time making the valuation process more inclusive, replicable and policy-oriented.

  • 15. Pereira, Laura
    et al.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Doshi, Samir
    Frantzeskaki, Niki
    Organising a Safe Space for Navigating Social-Ecological Transformations to Sustainability2015In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 6027-6044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for developing socially just living conditions for the world’s growing population whilst keeping human societies within a ‘safe operating space’ has become a modern imperative. This requires transformative changes in the dominant social norms, behaviours, governance and management regimes that guide human responses in areas such as urban ecology, public health, resource security (e.g., food, water, energy access), economic development and biodiversity conservation. However, such systemic transformations necessitate experimentation in public arenas of exchange and a deepening of processes that can widen multi-stakeholder learning. We argue that there is an emergent potential in bridging the sustainability transitions and resilience approaches to create new scientific capacity that can support large-scale social-ecological transformations (SETs) to sustainability globally, not just in the West. In this article, we elucidate a set of guiding principles for the design of a ‘safe space’ to encourage stronger interactions between these research areas and others that are relevant to the challenges faced. We envisage new opportunities for transdisciplinary collaboration that will develop an adaptive and evolving community of practice. In particular, we emphasise the great opportunity for engaging with the role of emerging economies in facilitating safe space experimentation.

  • 16. Regmi, Santosh Regmi
    et al.
    Gurung, Praju
    Zulkafli, Zed
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Public Administration and Policy Group, Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands.
    Tocachi, Boris Ochoa
    Buytaert, Wouter
    Mao, Feng
    Learning to cope with water variability through participatory monitoring: the case study of the mountainous region , Nepal2019In: Meteorology Hydrology and Water Management, ISSN 2299-3835, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participatory monitoring allows communities to understand the use and management of local water resources and at the same time develop a sense of ownership of environmental information. The data generated through participatory monitoring of stream flow and rainfall generate evidences to corroborate local people's experiences with changing water resources patterns. In this study we evaluate the potential of participatory monitoring of hydrological variables to improve scarce water supply utilization in agriculture. The case study site is the Mustang district in Nepal, which is located in the upper Kaligandaki river basin in the Himalayas with unique and complex geographical and climatic features. This region is characterized by a semi-arid climate with total annual precipitation of less than 300 mm. Water supply, agricultural land, and livestock grazing are the key ecosystem services that underpin livelihood security of the local population, particularly socio-economically vulnerable groups. An analysis of the measured stream flow data indicate that annual flow of water in the stream can meet the current crop irrigation water needs for the agricultural land of the research site. The data provide local farmers a new way of understanding local water needs. Participatory monitoring would contribute to an optimization of the use of ecosystem services to support economic development and livelihood improvement.

  • 17. Rivera-Ferre, Marta G.
    et al.
    Pereira, Laura
    Karpouzoglou, Timothy
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nicholas, A
    Onzere, Sheila
    Waterlander, Wilma
    Mahomoodally, Fawzi
    Vrieling, Anton
    Babalola, Fola D
    Ummenhofer, Caroline C
    Dogra, Atul
    Conti, Aline De
    Baldermann, Susanne
    Evoh, Chijioke
    A vision for transdisciplinarity in Future Earth: Perspectives from young researchers2013In: Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Sheate, W R
    et al.
    Eales, R P
    Daly, E
    Baker, J
    Murdoch, A
    Hill, C
    Ojike, U
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    niversity of Sussex, SPRU, Science and Technology Policy Research, United Kingdom.
    Spatial Representation and Specification of Ecosystem Services2012In: Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management, ISSN 1464-3332, E-ISSN 1757-5605, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1250001-1250036, article id 1250001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge for implementing an ecosystems approach to environmental decision-making processes, such as spatial planning, is to understand the range, nature and amount of ecosystem services currently provided and the potential for such service provision in the future. The ability to spatially represent ecosystems services is a critical element of the evidence base on which to make decisions about how physical space is used most effectively and sustainably, and the way people and activities are distributed at different spatial scales. This paper reports on the outcomes of a research project originally undertaken for the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which developed a methodology for mapping ecosystem services using GIS and readily available, existing land use/land cover datasets. Critical components of the methodology, in order to determine which datasets are appropriate for which services, are network analysis and stakeholder engagement techniques, to define the relevant typology of ecosystem services and their relationship to land use/land cover types. The methodology was developed and tested successfully in the context of green grid (green infrastructure) networks in a major UK regeneration area, the Thames Gateway, to the east of London, and its potential use in impact assessment further explored through a number of case studies.

  • 19. Termeer, Catrien J. A. M.
    et al.
    Feindt, Peter H.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Poppe, Krijn J.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Kramer, Koen
    Ge, Lan
    Mathijs, Erik
    Meuwissen, Miranda P. M.
    Institutions and the resilience of biobased production systems: the historical case of livestock intensification in the Netherlands2019In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 24, no 4, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disconnects between farming and urban systems are widely seen as impairing the resilience of biobased production systems (BBPSs). However, the institutional mechanisms that underlie these resilience problems are not well understood. In this explorative paper, which integrates elements from institutional and resilience theory, we develop a framework to analyze how institutionally shaped patterns of connects and disconnects affect the resilience of BBPs along the dimensions of robustness, adaptability, and transformability. This framework is applied to the historical case of pig livestock intensification in the Netherlands from 1870 to 2017. The case shows that institutions, successfully established in earlier periods, shape connects and disconnects in subsequent periods, thereby enabling and constraining resilience. A combination of perturbations, institutional layering, and shifts in ideational power is an important institutional mechanism for resilience. We conclude that building resilience requires a variety of reconnecting institutions and refraining from a focus on local reconnects or certification only.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf