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  • 1.
    Francon, Hugo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mystek, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Piper, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Innventia AB, Papermaking & Packaging, Box 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malti, Abdellah
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, Kemigarden 4, SE-41269 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 58, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ambient-Dried, 3D-Printable and Electrically Conducting Cellulose Nanofiber Aerogels by Inclusion of Functional Polymers2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 12, article id 1909383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a novel, green, and efficient way of preparing crosslinked aerogels from cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) and alginate using non-covalent chemistry. This new process can ultimately facilitate the fast, continuous, and large-scale production of porous, light-weight materials as it does not require freeze-drying, supercritical CO2 drying, or any environmentally harmful crosslinking chemistries. The reported preparation procedure relies solely on the successive freezing, solvent-exchange, and ambient drying of composite CNF-alginate gels. The presented findings suggest that a highly-porous structure can be preserved throughout the process by simply controlling the ionic strength of the gel. Aerogels with tunable densities (23-38 kg m(-3)) and compressive moduli (97-275 kPa) can be prepared by using different CNF concentrations. These low-density networks have a unique combination of formability (using molding or 3D-printing) and wet-stability (when ion exchanged to calcium ions). To demonstrate their use in advanced wet applications, the printed aerogels are functionalized with very high loadings of conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate (PEDOT:TOS) polymer by using a novel in situ polymerization approach. In-depth material characterization reveals that these aerogels have the potential to be used in not only energy storage applications (specific capacitance of 78 F g(-1)), but also as mechanical-strain and humidity sensors.

  • 2.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Berglund, Lars. A
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose Nanopaper with Monolithically Integrated Conductive Micropatterns2019In: Advanced Electronic Materials, E-ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1800924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a route to fabricate micropatterned conductive structures where the conductors are monolithically integrated with nanocellulose-based paper. To fabricate conductive features, microstructures are patterned on filter papers using wax-printing, followed by vacuum filtration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or silver nanowires (AgNWs) dispersed in aqueous cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). These patterns are then laminated onto a pure CNF substrate (both in gel-state) and dried to form cellulose nanopapers with integrated conductive micropatterns. Resolutions of the conductive features are shown down to 400 µm wide, 250 nm thick, and with conductivity values of 115 ± 5 S cm −1 for the CNF–CNT and 3770 ± 230 S cm −1 for the CNF–AgNW micropatterns. The nanopaper and the conductive patterns both constitute random fibrous networks, and they display similar ductility and swelling behavior in water. Thus, the integrated conductive micropatterns can withstand folding, as well as wetting cycles. This stability of the micropatterns makes them useful in various devices based on nanocellulose substrates. As an example, an electroanalytical nanopaper device that operates in wet conditions is demonstrated.

  • 3.
    Jain, Karishma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Garma, Leonardo D.
    Karolinska Inst, Med Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Engel, Emile
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ciftci, Göksu Cinar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Fager, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    3D printable composites of modified cellulose fibers and conductive polymers and their use in wearable electronics2023In: APPLIED MATERIALS TODAY, ISSN 2352-9407, Vol. 30, article id 101703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many bioelectronic applications where the additive manufacturing of conductive polymers may be of use. This method is cheap, versatile and allows fine control over the design of wearable electronic devices. Nanocellulose has been widely used as a rheology modifier in bio-based inks that are used to print electrical components and devices. However, the preparation of nanocellulose is energy and time consuming. In this work an easy-to-prepare, 3D-printable, conductive bio-ink; based on modified cellulose fibers and poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), is presented. The ink shows excellent printability, the printed samples are wet stable and show excellent electrical and electrochemical performance. The printed structures have a conductivity of 30 S/cm, high tensile strains (>40%), and specific capacitances of 211 F/g; even though the PEDOT:PSS only accounts for 40 wt% of the total ink composition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and Raman spectroscopy data show that the modified cellulose fibers induce conformational changes and phase separation in PEDOT:PSS. It is also demonstrated that wearable supercapacitors and biopotential-monitoring devices can be prepared using this ink.

  • 4.
    Li, Hailong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Asta, Nadia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Reevaluation of the adhesion between cellulose materials using macro spherical beads and flat model surfaces2024In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 332, p. 121894-121894, article id 121894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactions between dry cellulose were studied using model systems, cellulose beads, and cellulose films, usingcustom-built contact adhesion testing equipment. Depending on the configuration of the substrates in contact,Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film, cellulose films spin-coated either on PDMS or glass, the interaction showsthree distinct processes. Firstly, molecular interlocking is formed between cellulose and cellulose when there is asoft PDMS thin film backing the cellulose film. Secondly, without backing, no initial attraction force between thesurfaces is observed. Thirdly, a significant force increase, ΔF, is observed during the retraction process for cel­lulose on glass, and there is a maximum in ΔF when the retraction rate is increased. This is due to the kinetics of acontacting process occurring in the interaction zone between the surfaces caused by an interdigitation of a finefibrillar structure at the nano-scale, whereas, for the spin-coated cellulose surfaces on the PDMS backing, there isa more direct adhesive failure. The results have generated understanding of the interaction between cellulose-rich materials, which helps design new, advanced cellulose-based materials. The results also show thecomplexity of the interaction between these surfaces and that earlier mechanisms, based on macroscopic materialtesting, are simply not adequate for molecular tailoring.

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  • 5.
    Li, Hailong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden.
    Kruteva, Margarita
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Ctr Neutron Scattering & Biol Matter JCNS, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Dulle, Martin
    Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich Ctr Neutron Scattering & Biol Matter JCNS, D-52425 Julich, Germany..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mystek, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ji, Wenhai
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Understanding the Drying Behavior of Regenerated Cellulose Gel Beads: The Effects of Concentration and Nonsolvents2022In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 2608-2620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The drying behavior of regenerated cellulose gel beads swollen with different nonsolvents (e.g., water, ethanol, water/ethanol mixtures) is studied in situ on the macroscopic scale with an optical microscope as well as on nanoscale using small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques. Depending on the cellulose concentration, the structural evolution of beads during drying follows one of three distinct regimes. First, when the cellulose concentration is lower than 0.5 wt %, the drying process comprises three steps and, regardless of the water/ethanol mixture composition, a sharp structural transition corresponding to the formation of a cellulose II crystalline structure is observed. Second, when the cellulose concentration is higher than 5.0 wt %, a two-step drying process is observed and no structural transition occurs for any of the beads studied. Third, when the cellulose concentration is between 0.5 and 5.0 wt %, the drying process is dependent on the nonsolvent composition. A three-step drying process takes place for beads swollen with water/ethanol mixtures with a water content higher than 20%, while a two-step drying process is observed when the water content is lower than 20%. To describe the drying behavior governed by the cellulose concentration and nonsolvent composition, a simplified phase diagram is proposed.

  • 6.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Buchmann, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, ITN, Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, SE 60221, Sweden.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Khaliliazar, Shirin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Hailong
    Fysikum, Stockhohlm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herland, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Rapid prototyping of heterostructured organic microelectronics using wax printing, filtration, and transfer2021In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 14596-14605Article in journal (Refereed)
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    data set
  • 7.
    Qian, Zhenchao
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci ICCAS, Inst Chem, Beijing Natl Lab Mol Sci, Lab Polymer Phys & Chem, Zhongguancun North First St 2, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Li, Rui
    Chinese Acad Sci ICCAS, Inst Chem, Beijing Natl Lab Mol Sci, Lab Polymer Phys & Chem, Zhongguancun North First St 2, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Guo, Jing
    Chinese Acad Sci ICCAS, Inst Chem, Beijing Natl Lab Mol Sci, Lab Polymer Phys & Chem, Zhongguancun North First St 2, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Xiaofeng
    Beijing Univ Chem Technol, Beijing Key Lab Adv Funct Polymer Composites, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China..
    Li, Chuncheng
    ICCAS, CAS Key Lab Engn Plast, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Ning
    Chinese Acad Sci ICCAS, Inst Chem, Beijing Natl Lab Mol Sci, Lab Polymer Phys & Chem, Zhongguancun North First St 2, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Xu, Jian
    Chinese Acad Sci ICCAS, Inst Chem, Beijing Natl Lab Mol Sci, Lab Polymer Phys & Chem, Zhongguancun North First St 2, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Triboelectric nanogenerators made of polybenzazole aerogels as fire-resistant negative tribo-materials2019In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 64, article id UNSP 103900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flame-retardant negative tribo-materials are desirable for triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) using under harsh conditions, such as thermal power fields and aerospace. The existed negative tribo-materials are mainly polymeric materials, and their high-temperature stability and fire resistance still need to be improved. Herein, poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) aerogels (PBOAs) were used as the negative tribo-materials in TENGs. Because of the large porosity and high specific surface area, the resultant TENGs exhibit maximum open circuit voltage, short-circuit current density and charge density of 40 V, 2.9 mA m(-2) and 72 mu C m(-2), respectively. The device can light 36 LED bulbs and charge the capacitor to 10 V within 250 s. The device can also be used as a self-powered, highly sensitive sensor for monitoring human motion and even slight collisions with an impulse of only 3 mu N s. PBOA has been paired with aluminum foil to fabricate PBOA/Al TENGs, which exhibit V on of 32 V(, )J(SC) of 1.2 mA M-2 and charge density of 32 mu C M-2 at a temperature as high as 350 degrees C, demonstrating the possibility of application of TENGs in high-temperature environments.

  • 8.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vahid Mohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Layer-by-layer self-assembly of pillared two-dimensional multilayers2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 2558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report Layer-by-Layer (LbL) self-assembly of pillared two-dimensional (2D) multilayers, from water, onto a wide range of substrates. This LbL method uses a small molecule, tris(2-aminoethyl) amine (TAEA), and a colloidal dispersion of Ti3C2Tx MXene to LbL self-assemble (MXene/TAEA)(n )multilayers, where n denotes the number of bilayers. Assembly with TAEA results in highly ordered (MXene/TAEA)(n) multilayers where the TAEA expands the interlayer spacing of MXene flakes by only similar to 1 angstrom and reinforces the interconnection between them. The TAEA-pillared MXene multilayers show the highest electronic conductivity of 7.3 x10(4) S m(-1) compared with all reported MXene multilayers fabricated by LbL technique. The (MXene/ TAEA)(n) multilayers could be used as electrodes for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors delivering a high volumetric capacitance of 583 F cm(-3) and high energy and power densities of 3.0 Wh L-1 and 4400 W L-1, respectively. This strategy enables large-scale fabrication of highly conductive pillared MXene multilayers, and potentially fabrication of other 2D heterostructures.

  • 9.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Multifunctional Nanocomposites with High Strength and Capacitance Using 2D MXene and 1D Nanocellulose2019In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, article id 1902977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The family of two-dimensional (2D) metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, are among the most promising electrode materials for supercapacitors thanks to their high metal-like electrical conductivity and surface-functional-group-enabled pseudocapacitance. A major drawback of these materials is, however, the low mechanical strength, which prevents their applications in lightweight, flexible electronics. A strategy of assembling freestanding and mechanically robust MXene (Ti3C2Tx) nanocomposites with one-dimensional (1D) cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) from their stable colloidal dispersions is reported. The high aspect ratio of CNF (width of approximate to 3.5 nm and length reaching tens of micrometers) and their special interactions with MXene enable nanocomposites with high mechanical strength without sacrificing electrochemical performance. CNF loading up to 20%, for example, shows a remarkably high mechanical strength of 341 MPa (an order of magnitude higher than pristine MXene films of 29 MPa) while still maintaining a high capacitance of 298 F g(-1) and a high conductivity of 295 S cm(-1). It is also demonstrated that MXene/CNF hybrid dispersions can be used as inks to print flexible micro-supercapacitors with precise dimensions. This work paves the way for fabrication of robust multifunctional MXene nanocomposites for printed and lightweight structural devices.

  • 10.
    Tian, Weiqian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Auburn Univ, Dept Mech & Mat Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Layer-by-layer assembly of pillared MXene multilayers for high volumetric energy storage and beyond2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    3D interdigitated energy storage devices built inside aerogels using layer by layer assembly2017In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Heasman, Patrick
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Li, Hailong
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden.
    Iakunkov, Artem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, 60174, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dynamic Networks of Cellulose Nanofibrils Enable Highly Conductive and Strong Polymer Gel Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 30, article id 2212806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tunable dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are utilized to prepare high-performance polymer gel electrolytes. By swelling an anisotropically dewatered, but never dried, CNF gel in acidic salt solutions, a highly sparse network is constructed with a fraction of CNFs as low as 0.9%, taking advantage of the very high aspect ratio and the ultra-thin thickness of the CNFs (micrometers long and 2–4 nm thick). These CNF networks expose high interfacial areas and can accommodate massive amounts of the ionic conductive liquid polyethylene glycol-based electrolyte into strong homogeneous gel electrolytes. In addition to the reinforced mechanical properties, the presence of the CNFs simultaneously enhances the ionic conductivity due to their excellent strong water-binding capacity according to computational simulations. This strategy renders the electrolyte a room-temperature ionic conductivity of 0.61 ± 0.12 mS cm−1 which is one of the highest among polymer gel electrolytes. The electrolyte shows superior performances as a separator for lithium iron phosphate half-cells in high specific capacity (161 mAh g−1 at 0.1C), excellent rate capability (5C), and cycling stability (94% capacity retention after 300 cycles at 1C) at 60 °C, as well as stable room temperature cycling performance and considerably improved safety compared with commercial liquid electrolyte systems.

  • 13.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malti, Abdellah
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tu, D.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Copper-Plated Paper for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries2018In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 14, no 48, article id 1803313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper is emerging as a promising flexible, high surface-area substrate for various new applications such as printed electronics, energy storage, and paper-based diagnostics. Many applications, however, require paper that reaches metallic conductivity levels, ideally at low cost. Here, an aqueous electroless copper-plating method is presented, which forms a conducting thin film of fused copper nanoparticles on the surface of the cellulose fibers. This paper can be used as a current collector for anodes of lithium-ion batteries. Owing to the porous structure and the large surface area of cellulose fibers, the copper-plated paper-based half-cell of the lithium-ion battery exhibits excellent rate performance and cycling stability, and even outperforms commercially available planar copper foil-based anode at ultra-high charge/discharge rates of 100 C and 200 C. This mechanically robust metallic-paper composite has promising applications as the current collector for light-weight, flexible, and foldable paper-based 3D Li-ion battery anodes.

  • 14.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Hailong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Strong Thin Films with High Lithium Ion Conductance for Batteries and Beyond2021In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 17, no 32, p. 2100954-, article id 2100954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most widely used polymeric ion conductors which has the potential for a wide range of applications in energy storage. The enhancement of ionic conductivity of PEO-based electrolytes is generally achieved by sacrificing the mechanical properties. Using layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly with a nanoscale precision, mechanically strong and self-healable PEO/polyacrylic acid composite thin films with a high Li+ conductivity of 2.3 ± 0.8 × 10−4 S cm−1 at 30 °C, and a strength of 3.7 MPa is prepared. These values make the LbL composite among the best recorded multifunctional solid electrolytes. The electrolyte thin film withstands at least 1000 cycles of striping/plating of Li at 0.05 mA cm−2. It is further shown that the LbL thin films can be used as separators for Li-ion batteries to deliver a capacity of 116 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C in an all-LbL-assembled lithium iron phosphate/lithium titanate battery. Finally, it is demonstrated that the thin films can be used as ion-conducting substrates for flexible electrochemical devices, including micro supercapacitors and electrochemical transistors.

  • 15.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Tybrandt, Klas
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Sci & Technol, Lab Organ Elect, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-60174 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Layer-by-Layer Assembly of High-Performance Electroactive Composites Using a Multiple Charged Small Molecule2019In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 35, no 32, p. 10367-10373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a versatile tool for fabricating multilayers with tailorable nanostructures. LbL, however, generally relies on polyelectrolytes, which are mostly insulating and induce large interlayer distances. We demonstrate a method in which we replace polyelectrolytes with the smallest unit capable of LbL self-assembly: a molecule with multiple positive charges, tris(3-aminopropyl)amine (TAPA), to fabricate LbL films with negatively charged single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). TAPA introduces less defects during the LbL build-up and results in more efficient assembly of films with denser micromorphology. Twenty bilayers of TAPA/CNT showed a low sheet resistance of 11 k Omega, a high transparency of 91% at 500 nm, and a high electronic conductivity of 1100 S/m on planar substrates. We also fabricated LbL films on porous foams with a conductivity of 69 mS/m and used them as electrodes for supercapacitors with a high specific capacitance of 43 F/g at a discharging current density of 1 A/g.

  • 16.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    A. J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute Department of Materials Science and Engineering Drexel University.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry Stockholm University.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Nanostructured Electrodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries2021In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 17, no 6, article id 2006434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaining control over the nanoscale assembly of different electrode components in energy storage systems can open the door for design and fabrication of new electrode and device architectures that are not currently feasible. This work presents aqueous layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly as a route towards design and fabrication of advanced lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with unprecedented control over the structure of the electrode at the nanoscale, and with possibilities for various new designs of batteries beyond the conventional planar systems. LbL self-assembly is a greener fabrication route utilizing aqueous dispersions that allow various Li+ intercalating materials assembled in complex 3D porous substrates. The spatial precision of positioning of the electrode components, including ion intercalating phase and electron-conducting phase, is down to nanometer resolution. This capable approach makes a lithium titanate anode delivering a specific capacity of 167 mAh g−1 at 0.1C and having comparable performances to conventional slurry-cast electrodes at current densities up to 100C. It also enables high flexibility in the design and fabrication of the electrodes where various advanced multilayered nanostructures can be tailored for optimal electrode performance by choosing cationic polyelectrolytes with different molecular sizes. A full-cell LIB with excellent mechanical resilience is built on porous insulating foams. 

  • 17.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zou, W.
    Zhao, H.
    Guo, J.
    Qian, Z.
    Li, R.
    Ouyang, Liangqi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, X.
    Dong, H.
    Zhao, N.
    Xu, J.
    Dual-Tunable Structural Colors from Liquid-Infused Aerogels2020In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, Vol. 8, no 7, article id 1901825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, dual-tunable structural colors generated from liquid-infused, robust silsesquioxane aerogels due to the specific light scattering by the aerogel skeleton in liquids with matching refractive indices, are reported. The colors are tunable by changing the temperature and the composition of the liquid that roots from the coherence between the colors and the refractive index of the infused liquid. The finding provides new insights and tools for constructing structural colors and light management. It also opens applications of stimuli-responsive smart windows, displays, and sensors. Taking advantage of the penetrable light of selected wavelength, the 3D structures of aerogel skeletons are reconstructed by an optical method, which provides a facile alternative approach to characterizing aerogel structure and will be instrumental to the understanding of the relationship between skeleton structure and mechanical property of porous 3D structures.

1 - 17 of 17
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