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  • 1. Bajones, Markus
    et al.
    Fischinger, David
    Weiss, Astrid
    Wolf, Daniel
    Vincze, Markus
    Puente, Paloma de la
    Körtner, Tobias
    Weninger, Markus
    Papoutsakis, Konstantinos
    Michel, Damien
    Qammaz, Ammar
    Panteleris, Paschalis
    Foukarakis, Michalis
    Adami, Ilia
    Ioannidi, Danai
    Leonidis, Asterios
    Antona, Margherita
    Argyros, Antonis
    Mayer, Peter
    Panek, Paul
    Eftring, Håkan
    Frennert, Susanne
    Hobbit: Providing Fall Detection and Prevention for the Elderly in the Real World2018In: Journal of Robotics, Vol. 2018, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Eftring, H.
    et al.
    Frennert, Susanne
    Designing a social and assistive robot for seniors2016In: Zeitschrift fÌr Gerontologie und Geriatrie, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 274-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Frennert, Susanne
    Domestication of a telehealthcare system2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Frennert, Susanne
    Elderly People’s Perceptions of a Telehealthcare System: Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity and Observability2013In: Taylor & Francis,Journal of Technology in Human Services, 31:3, 218-237, DOI: 10.1080/15228835.2013.814557Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Frennert, Susanne
    GiraffPlus: A System for Monitoring Activities and Physiological Parameters and Promoting Social Interaction for Elderly2014In: In Human-Computer Systems Interaction: Backgrounds and Applications 3 Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing Volume 300:261-271, DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-08491-6_22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Literature review: The current levels of understanding of interactive robotics2018In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 17, no s, p. 160-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Lost in digitalization?: Municipality employment of welfare technologies2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 635-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Swedish municipalities face a number of daunting challenges; an aging population, the public's increased demands and expectations on municipality services, and a strained economy to mention some. Welfare technology, a Scandinavian concept launched to promote digitalization, is seen as one solution to meet these challenges. Objective: Despite these promises, few welfare technology applications are offered by local Swedish municipalities and care organizations. Numerous studies have shown that Swedish municipalities have a great interest in welfare technologies. Methods: In this article, we draw on empirical research in one Swedish municipality. Through two case studies it is illustrated how technological change and municipality employment of welfare technologies are employed. Results: These case studies show how core values of care are being lost in the quest for digitalization due to the lack of organizational skills and knowledge in transforming the relationship of caregiving and care-receiving through the use of digital technology. Conclusions: Digitalization and welfare technologies deployed ought to represent and support the core values of caregiving and to receive care. Thus, digital transformation most likely will transform conditions for care receivers and working conditions for care workers. New work processes will evolve, which in turn produce new meanings of home help service work and caregiving.

  • 8.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Narrative Review: Technologies in Eldercare2018In: Journal of Science and TechnologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Frennert, Susanne
    Older People and the Adoption of Innovations: A study of the expectations on the use of social assistive robots and telehealthcare systems2014Other (Other academic)
  • 10. Frennert, Susanne
    Older people’s involvement in the development of a social assistive robot2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Social companion robots in eldercare – who gains and who loses?2013In: Proceeding at ICSR2013 at the workshop on social companion robots, Bristol, UK, October 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12. Frennert, Susanne
    STS-inspired design to meet the challenges of modern ageing. Welfare technology as a tool to promote user driven innovations or another way to keep older users hostage?2015In: Journal title: Technological Forecasting & Social Change ; DOI information: 10.1016/j.techfore.2014.04.012Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    The CPS triangle: A suggested framework for evaluating robots in everyday life2018In: 10th International Conference on Social Robotics, ICSR 2018, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 369-379Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a conceptual framework: the CPS triangle, which has evolved over four years of research on ‘older people meet robots’. It is a synthesis of domestication theory, modern social practice theory and empirical data. Case studies on the domestication of one current technology, the robotic vacuum cleaner, and two emergent technologies, the eHealth system and the service robot, provide empirical evidence. Considering ‘older people meet robots’ within the framework of the proposed CPS triangle can help us to understand older people’s domestication or rejection of robots. In the CPS triangle, C represents the cognitive dimension; P, the practical dimension; and S, the symbolic dimension. The CPS triangle is meant to serve as a tool rather than a rule. It is recommended that the CPS triangle be tested more widely in a range of contexts. It will require adaptation and customisation for the context of use.

  • 14. Frennert, Susanne
    Using Attention Cards to Facilitate Active Participation in Eliciting Old Adults’ Requirements for Assistive Robots2013In: Proceedings at RoMan2013, Gyeongju, Korea, August 2013Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    What older people expect of robots: A mixed methods approach2013In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how older people in Sweden imagine the potential role of robots in their lives. The data collection involved mixed methods, including focus groups, a workshop, a questionnaire and interviews. The findings obtained and lessons learnt from one method fed into another. In total, 88 older people were involved. The results indicate that the expectations and preconceptions about robots are multi-dimensional and ambivalent. Ambivalence can been seen in the tension between the benefits of having a robot looking after the older people, helping with or carrying out tasks they no longer are able to do, and the parallel attitudes, resilience and relational inequalities that accompany these benefits. The participants perceived that having a robot might be "good for others but not themselves", "good as a machine not a friend" while their relatives and informal caregivers perceived a robot as "not for my relative but for other older people".

  • 16. Frennert, Susanne
    Would Granny Let an Assistive Robot into Her Home?2012In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 7621, 2012, pp 128-137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Cesta, A.
    Cortellessa, G.
    Coraci, L.
    Galindo, C.
    Gonzalez, J.
    Karlsson, L.
    Forsberg, A.
    Frennert, S.
    Furfari, F.
    Loutfi, A.
    Orlandini, A.
    Palumbo, F.
    Pecora, F.
    von Rump, S.
    Štimec, A.
    Ullberg, J.
    Ötslund, B.
    GiraffPlus: A System for Monitoring Activities and Physiological Parameters and Promoting Social Interaction for Elderly2014In: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, Vol. 300, p. 261-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Case report: Implications of Doing Research on Socially Assistive Robots in real Homes2017In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current paper addresses the implications of doing research on socially assistive robots in real homes. In contrast to laboratory studies, studies of robots in their intended natural environments can provide insights into people’s experiences of robots, and if and how a robot becomes embedded and used in people’s everyday life. However, moving robots out of the lab and into real life environments poses several challenges. Laboratory methods mainly focus on cause-and-effect relations between independent and dependent variables, while researchers who are conducting studies in real homes have much less control. In home trials, researchers need to decide what kind of data is obtainable and available. In real homes, researchers face unique challenges that require unique and pragmatic approaches. Any single study conducted in a real home is likely to have methodological limitations. Therefore, several different studies using different robots and methods are needed before the results can be converged in order to reach conclusions that are convincingly supported. This paper is an effort to provide such a report on a specific empirical case and converging findings from other studies. The goal is to provide an account of the research challenges and opportunities encountered when introducing a robot into its intended practice: the homes of older people. The aim is to give enough details for other researchers to critically examine and systematically build on the insights and findings presented.

  • 19. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Older People´s Involvement in the Development of a Social Assistive Robot2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of social assistive robots is a promising approach to enable a growing number of elderly people to continue to live in their own homes as long as possible. Older people are often an excluded group in product development; however this age group is the fastest growing segment in most developed societies. We present a participatory design approach as a methodology to create a dialogue with older people in order to understand the values embodied in robots. We present the results of designing and deploying three participatory workshops and implementing a subsequent robot mock-up study. The results indicate that robot mock-ups can be used as a tool to broaden the knowledge-base of the users' personal goals and device needs in a variety of ways, including supporting age-related changes, supporting social interaction and regarding robot aesthetic. Concerns that robots may foster inactivity and laziness as well as loss of human contact were repeatedly raised and must be addressed in the development of assistive domestic robots.

  • 20.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Using attention cards to facilitate active participation in eliciting old adults' requirements for assistive robots2013In: Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, 2013, p. 774-779Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging old users in the exploration of future product concepts can be challenging. It is of great value to find ways to actively involve them in the design of novel technologies intended for them, particularly when they have no prior experience of the technology in question. One obstacle in this process is that many old people do not identify themselves as being old or they think that it (the technology) would be good for others but not themselves. This paper presents a card method to overcome this obstacle. A full-day workshop with three internal focus groups was run with 14 participants. Based on our experience, we propose a way in which active participation in the process of eliciting user requirements for assistive robots from old users with no prior experience of assistive robots can be carried out.

  • 21.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences Lund University Sweden.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Östlund, Britt
    What Older People Expect of Robots: A Mixed Methods Approach2013In: Social Robotics, Springer International Publishing , 2013, p. 19-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Elderly People's Perceptions of a Telehealthcare System: Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity and Observability2013In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 218-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of telehealthcare systems to promote independent living for elderly people is growing. The results presented in this article, derived from an initial user lab test of a telecare system—GiraffPlus—indicate that the crucial factor for adoption of telehealthcare systems is not usability but the system's ability to support autonomy in everyday life. Eleven users tested the usability and reported what they perceived as possible benefits of having such a system at home. To support autonomy, customization is crucial for the system to be perceived as meaningful for the individual. Our analysis confirms previous research.

  • 23. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Kortner, Tobias
    Batko-Klein, Daliah
    Hebesberger, Denise
    Weninger, Markus
    Gisinger, Christoph
    Frennert, Susanne
    Eftring, Hakan
    Antona, Margarita
    Adami, Ilia
    Weiss, Astrid
    Bajones, Markus
    Vincze, Markus
    Results of a real world trial with a mobile social service robot for older adults2016In: 2016 11th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), IEEE , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Östlund, B.
    Domestication of a telehealthcare system2014In: Gerontechnology, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Östlund, B.
    The domestication of robotic vacuum cleaners among seniors2014In: Gerontechnology, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    Eftring, Håkan
    Capturing seniors\textquotesingle requirements for assistive robots by the use of attention cards2012In: Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction Making Sense Through Design - NordiCHI \textquotesingle12, ACM Press , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Review: Seven Matters of Concern of Social Robotics and Older People2014In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 299-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article maps the range of currently held scientific positions on matters of concern involving social robots and older people. 345 publications from peer-reviewed journals and conferences were narrowed down to 31 key publications that were studied in detail and categorised into seven matters of concern: (1) role of robots in older people's lives, (2) factors affecting older people's acceptance of robots, (3) lack of mutual inspiration in the development of robots for older people, (4) robot aesthetics, (5) ethical implications of using robots in caring for older people, (6) robotic research methodology, and (7) technical determinism versus social construction of social robots. The findings indicate that older people are implicated but not present in the development of robots and that their matters of concern are not identified in the design process. Instead, they are ascribed general needs of social robots due to societal changes such as ageing demographics and demands from the healthcare industry. The conceptualisation of older people seems to be plagued with stereotypical views such as that they are lonely, frail and in need of robotic assistance. Our conclusions are that the perceptions of older people need to be re-examined and perhaps redefined in order to fairly represent who they are, and that more research on older people as social robotic users is needed.

  • 28.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    What happens when seniors participate in new eHealth schemes?2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 572-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article adds empirical depth to our understanding of seniors’ involvement in the making of eHealth systems. Multi-sited interviews and observations were conducted at seniors’ homes before an eHealth system was installed, during the home trials and post-removal of the system. Our findings indicate that although the senior participants chose to participate in the home trials, the choice itself was configured by the stigmatization of seniors as technophobes, fear of “falling behind” and the association of technology with youth, the future and being up-to-date. Being a participant in home trials of an eHealth system became an identity of its own, representing a forward thinking and contemporary person who embraced changes and new technology.

  • 29.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Lund University.
    Would Granny Let an Assistive Robot into Her Home?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assistive robots have received considerable research attention due to the increase of the senior population around the world and the shortage of caregivers. However, limited attention has been paid to involving seniors in the design process in order to elicit their attitudes and perception of having their own robot. This study addresses this issue. We conducted a workshop with 14 Swedish seniors age 65 to 86. The findings indicate that: (1) the functionality of the robot is far more important than the appearance; (2) the usefulness will determine the acceptance of a robot; (3) seniors feel it is important to keep up to date with new technological developments; (4) assistive robots were not perceived as intrusive and having a robotic presence in the seniors' bathrooms and bedrooms was considered acceptable. These findings suggest that seniors are prepared to give assistive robots a try if the robot is perceived as useful.

  • 30.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Olander, Elin
    Jonsson, Oskar
    Frennert, Susanne
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    STS-inspired design to meet the challenges of modern aging: Welfare technology as a tool to promote user driven innovations or another way to keep older users hostage?2015In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 93, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older technology users and their integration into IT society have been on the research agenda since digitalization took off. Given the attempts to develop user-driven design, it is surprising that the appearance of technologies older people are provided with, or are the target group for, have not progressed. Now another political agenda, coined as "welfare technology", is being launched in Scandinavia. It is the reminiscent of previous arguments for why demographics, welfare and the need for new business arenas should be prioritized. This paper argues that STS-inspired design can contribute to a paradigm shift that breaks this trend and instead helps to develop proactive technology that meets the needs and demands of today's senior citizens. Two cases illustrate the way the imbalance between technology and older people's influence persists over time. Another three cases with a bearing on design sciences are singled out and discussed; the selection of older subjects; the understanding of the "social" in going from the laboratory to real-life settings; and the "making of meaning" in product development. The conclusions point to the opportunity to bridge the imbalance when introducing welfare technology by introducing STS-inspired reflections on engineering and design.

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