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  • 1.
    Brown, Mark
    et al.
    Univ Florida, Ctr Environm Policy, Phelps Lab, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Raugei, Marco
    Oxford Brookes Univ, Fac Technol Design & Environm, Wheatley Campus, Wheatley OX33 1HX, England..
    Viglia, Silvio
    Univ Florida, Ctr Environm Policy, Phelps Lab, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Casazza, Marco
    Parthenope Univ Naples, Dept Sci & Technol, Ctr Direz, Isola C4, I-80143 Naples, Italy..
    Schnitzer, Hans
    StadtLABOR Innovat Urban Qual Life Ldt, Griesgasse 40, A-8020 Graz, Austria..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ulgiati, Sergio
    Parthenope Univ Naples, Dept Sci & Technol, Ctr Direz, Isola C4, I-80143 Naples, Italy..
    Editorial: Indicators of Energy Use in Urban Systems2018In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 94, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bögel, Paula M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure. Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS), Germany.
    Upham, P.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    What is needed for citizen-centered urban energy transitions: Insights on attitudes towards decentralized energy storage2021In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 149, article id 112032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to fill a research gap in the area of consumer-citizen attitudes to business models for decentralized energy storage, at the level of households and buildings. The study focuses on the interaction of such attitudes and their underlying motivation factors with socio-cultural, contextual factors. Self-determination theory (SDT) is used as a theoretical framework, to connect interpersonal and contextual factors, addressing the question of how contexts influence the motivation to support energy storage. Drawing on SDT, this study examines the role of autarky (independence from the energy system), autonomy (control over energy management) and relatedness (degree of sharing required) in this regard, embedded and interpreted in the socio-cultural local context of two demonstration sites in Sweden and Portugal. A mixed method approach is used. Quantitative survey data provides information on local social and cultural dimensions, followed by stakeholder consultation workshops that elicit participants’ views on different models of decentralized energy storage. The findings raise questions of how to improve autarky and autonomy for prosumers, while keeping the need for time investment low and provide flexibility regarding the required degree of interaction between prosumers. Implications for business models and policy support for citizen-centered sustainable urban energy systems are derived.

  • 3.
    Bögel, Paula
    et al.
    Institute for Environmental and Sustainability Communication (INFU), Leuphana University Lüneburg.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Upham, Paul
    Institute for Environmental and Sustainability Communication (INFU), Leuphana University Lüneburg.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Linking socio-technical transition studies and organisational change management: Steps towards an integrative, multi-scale heuristic2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the role of agency is widely acknowledged in socio-technical transition research, there remains a research gap on agency in transitions and a call for studies using an actor-centred approach to transition studies. In response to this call, this paper addresses the role of actors and, particularly, organisations in transitions. It examines the role of organisational change in socio-technical sustainability transitions and, more specifically, how transition initiatives may trigger and support these changes in organisations and systems. For this purpose, the paper draws on literature from both transition studies and organisational change management (OCM) to build a multi-scale, integrative theoretical heuristic. This addresses drivers and barriers for organisational change as an integral part of transition processes, connecting the micro level of the individual, the meso level of the organisation and the macro level of the broader system in which the organisation is located. With the goal of illustrating the links between OCM and transition studies, this paper empirically examines the impact of Region 2050, a large, multi-organisation transition initiative in Sweden, in terms of creating change within the organisations involved. The main focus is on how the organisations acquire the new knowledge and capabilities required for improving regional planning for sustainability. The empirical study identifies leverage points at the micro-, meso- and macro-levels, which may be used in order to change strategic planning processes. Three different theoretical concepts from transition studies and OCM that could help to foster long-term planning are also identified: (1) the macro-level of institutional plurality and its connection to the meso- (organisational) level; (2) collaboration as a key success factor on the organisational level; and (3) at the micro-level, the roles of individuals as change agents and boundary spanners. Overall, the case highlights the merits of the OCM literature for transition studies and their emphasis on understanding interacting processes operating at multiple scales.

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  • 4.
    Dóczi, Gabriella
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Rohracher, Harald
    Linköping Univ, Dept Themat Studies Technol & Social Change, SE-58183 Linköping, Sweden..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Knowledge management in transition management: The ripples of learning2022In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 78, article id 103621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the extensive literature on learning in urban transitions, we still have a limited understanding on how higher-order learning takes place in transition management and is spread within the transition arena. In this paper we analyze the efforts of transferring such embedded knowledge and its interrelation with learning through the examples of three Swedish municipalities engaged in urban transition management. To do so, we developed a framework of learning ripples that conceptualizes learning across social boundaries as an active and two-way process that goes beyond transferring and receiving knowledge, but also requires higher order learning that includes knowledge integration in the form of defining and formulating one's role and contributions to transitions. We found that higher order learning is largely influenced by the quality and frequency of interactions between the transferer and receivers. The further a stakeholder was located from the center of the transition arena in terms of direct interactions, the less chance occurred for higher order learning that resulted in tensions and conflicts in the collaboration. Our results show the problem as a lack of knowledge integration or a lack of conditions which allow stakeholders to articulate their views or develop an idea about their own role in the whole process.

  • 5.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Molinari, Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Sharing Spaces in the Sharing Economy - to save energy, increasewell-being or boost inn vation? How do new initiatives align with energy transition?2017In: BIWAES - Biennial International Workshop Advances in Energy Studies, Graz, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our paper is informed by the recent interest in how the sharing economy and related initiatives mayact as drivers for energy transition and increase well-being and social sustainability in smart sustainable city contexts. We take the example of temporary buildings that for a limited time period offer shared public spaces for public events in the city. Such initiatives are often linked to quadruple helix initiatives in which a local city council, industry and academia join forces to engage citizens in the energy and climate debate, with a temporary building structure as the focal point. The paper argues that such energy initiatives are valuable in terms of social sustainability since they create additional public space for the benefit of citizen debate; contribute scalable solutions and effective infrastructure that can promote energy awareness among citizens. However, there is limited scientific evidence, and a lacking awareness, of the energy efficiency and climate comfort relating to temporary buildings for public use. Our preliminary results show that such factors risk to obscure the well-intended objectives of quadruple helix initiatives to support energy transition. The revealed problems of a Stockholm use case suggest that in spite of significant social and economic impact resulting from curated public events which attracted an unprecedented number of visitors, energy consumption, climate comfort and indoor air quality are nevertheless important factors that also must be considered in the design and implementation of temporary building structures. The paper concludes that better climate controlshared economy thinking is necessary at theearliest stage of a planning process, for temporary buildings to be successful.

  • 6.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Gourjii, A.
    Nikiforovich, E.
    Cherniy, D.
    A study on mathematical short-term modelling of environmental pollutant transport by sea currents: The lagrangian approach2017In: Journal of Environmental Accounting and Management, ISSN 2325-6192, E-ISSN 2325-6206, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 87-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with short-term modelling of pollutant transport on the sea surface after environmental accidents. Using the Lagrangian approach, a two-dimensional model of pollutant flow is developed to determine the average velocity field of the flow in the presence of tidal currents and sea surface wind stress for an arbitrarily shaped coastline. This approach assumes that the main transport mechanism is convection. Short-term scenarios are considered, where diffusion effects on pollutant transport can be neglected. The hydrodynamic problem is solved by the method of discrete singularities adapted to fluid advection problems. The problem of environmental pollutant transport by sea currents is reduced to integration of the advection equations to determine the spatio-temporal properties of the spreading pollution. The model was verified through comparison of the results against natural observations on the spread of an oil spill on the sea surface following a collision between the Chinese bulk carrier Fu Shan Hai and the Cyprian container ship Gdynia near the island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea (May 31, 2003). Satisfactory agreement was found between results of a 7-day numerical simulation and observed data. The proposed model can therefore be used for real-time prediction of short-term pollutant transport on a sea surface with an arbitrarily shaped coastline, to support decision-making processes during maritime accidents, in particular oil spills.

  • 7.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Liu, Gengyuan
    Ulgiati, Sergio
    Energy and urban systems2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 186, p. 83-85Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nikiforovich, E.
    Similarity problems for steady state geothermal systems2014In: International Journal of Fluid Mechanics Research, ISSN 1064-2277, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 547-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing energy efficiency of the geothermal systems (GS) is an important task for further development and implementation of the geothermal energy for industrial and domestic heating and cooling. Achieving the higher efficiency, in its turn, requires insight into thermodynamic interaction of all elements of GS. Mathematical modeling of such systems, as well as the development of similarity methods for such modeling is highly relevant because of the high cost of the GS. The presented in the paper mathematical model of a strongly non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems Ground - Borehole Heat Exchanger - Ground Source Heat Pump has been elaborated to describe the energy exchange between the ground, BHE and GSHP. Based on this model a stationary problem of such system operation has been solved. A new type of non-equilibrium spatial scales for this problem, not depending on its geometric parameters and that are determined by energy characteristics of GS are introduced. It is shown that in the special variables considered problem is characterized by a unique dimensionless parameter - the ratio of the thermal conductivity of the ground and brine. This allows us to formulate new approaches to GS modeling.The physical interpretation of the received results is provided.

  • 9.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nikiforovich, Eugene
    Institute of Hydromechanics of NASU, 8/4 Zhelyabova Street, Kiev, Ukraine.
    A phenomenological theory of steady-state vertical geothermal systems: A novel approach2019In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, Vol. 175, p. 23-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a novel approach for studying the stationary energy characteristics of vertical geothermal systems (VGS) using stationary two-dimensional phenomenological mathematical theory. The approach describes VGS as a single, strongly nonequilibrium thermodynamic system consisting of a soil, a borehole with secondary fluid and a ground source heat pump (GSHP). The model uses continuity conditions for temperature and local heat fluxes between VGS components. The theory includes a special class of nonequilibrium spatial scale of VGS that is independent of its geometrical parameters. It is determined by the energy characteristics of the heat pump and the thermodynamic properties of soil and secondary fluid. Spatial variables can be chosen so that the energy characteristics of the VGS depend on only one dimensionless parameter (a similarity parameter), the thermal conductivity ratio of soil to secondary fluid. This considerably simplifies interpretation of theoretical and experimental results obtained using similarity methods. We show that, under real conditions of VGS functioning, the value of this similarity parameter varies from 0.5 to 10. The approach can be used to optimise GSHP systems to obtain energy of the required amount and quality to capitalise on heat pumps as ‘flexible agents’ in Smart Energy Systems.

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  • 10.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Ulgiati, Sergio
    BIWAES 2015 9th Biennial International Workshop Advances in Energy Studies: Energy and Urban Systems2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kordas, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Segalàs, J.
    Mulder, Karel
    Nikiforovich, E.
    Joint Course in Sustainable Development at Kiev Polytechnic Institute: an example of cooperation among 4 European universities2009In: In Energy Efficiency and Environmental Protection: Education and Sustainable Technologies International Conference, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Larsson, Allan
    et al.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Anneroth, Mikael
    Rapport från möten i EU-kommissionen och Europaparlamentet: 9-10 April 2018 Info 2018:22018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta dokument är en reserapport från besök i EU-kommissionen och Europaparlamentet av en delegation från programkontor och programstyrelse i Viable Cities.

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    Reserapport
  • 13. Larsson, Allan
    et al.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Anneroth, Mikael
    Rapport från möten i EU-kommissionen och Europaparlamentet: 9-10 APRIL 2018 INFO 2018:22018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 14. Maranghi, S.
    et al.
    Parisi, M. L.
    Facchini, A.
    Rubino, A.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Basosi, R.
    Integrating urban metabolism and life cycle assessment to analyse urban sustainability2020In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 112, article id 106074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, the close correlation between urban development and the concept of sustainability has become increasingly evident and important. This is demonstrated by European Union policies concerning EU cities and the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including sustainable development goal (SDG) 11: Sustainable cities and communities. In the context of increasing urbanization, it is essential to find innovative methods to manage urban living systems and to establish a standard method for assessing the environmental performance of cities and their infrastructures. A unified and complete methodology for assessing policies for urban sustainability that takes into consideration urban complexity is currently lacking. In this paper, we integrate the Urban Metabolism and Lice Cycle Assessment approach to assess urban sustainability by developing a multi-dimensional measure framework applied to cities. Our aim is to provide a holistic view of the city and unveiling the interconnections among a set of urban dimensions identified by means of an approach based on complex systems science and complex networks. We also propose a specific survey to investigate the city in a multi-dimensional perspective and suggest key indicators based on network centrality measures for investigating and comparing the interconnections among a set of urban dimensions specifically identified (e.g. energy, material, transport). Finally, a case study based on Beijing is considered to show potential applications.

  • 15.
    Markendahl, Jan
    et al.
    KTH. Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Movin, Staffan
    Market Technol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    On the role and potential of IoT in different industries Analysis of actor cooperation and challenges for introduction of new technology2017In: 2017 JOINT 13TH CTTE AND 10TH CMI CONFERENCE ON INTERNET OF THINGS - BUSINESS MODELS, USERS, AND NETWORKS / [ed] Falch, M, IEEE , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study how IoT technology can be introduced and used in different sectors; industrial IoT, smart energy, smart homes, smart cities, health care and social care, sports and well-being. The research has given increased insights into opportunities and obstacles for the introduction of IoT in different sectors. The main obstacles are considered to be i) specific IoT solutions often tend to be a small part of the overall solution, ii) lack of knowledge about which overall services the IoT solution may be part of, iii) Fragmentation and insufficient scalability, iv) Distrust and hesitation among actors to share data and platforms and finally, v) fear of changing the own business model. The analysis of our cases indicates that most of the challenges occur due to the fact that the solutions initially have been developed using a single firm business model. In order to survive or grow a networked business model is needed.

  • 16.
    Mattsson, Moa
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Umeå Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Liv
    RISE Res Inst, S-41258 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Nair, Gireesh
    Umeå Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    An Exploratory Study on Swedish Stakeholders' Experiences with Positive Energy Districts2023In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 16, no 12, article id 4790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive energy district (PED) is a novel idea aimed to have an annual surplus of renewable energy and net zero greenhouse gas emissions within an area. However, it is still an ambiguous concept, which might be due to the complexity of city district projects with interconnected infrastructures and numerous stakeholders involved. This study discusses various aspects of PED implementation and presents practitioners' experiences with the PED concept, challenges, and facilitators they have faced with real projects. The study is based on interviews with ten Swedish professionals. The major challenges reported for PED implementation were local energy production and energy flexibility, sub-optimization, legislation, suitable system boundaries, and involvement of stakeholders. Most of the interviewees mentioned improved collaboration, integrated innovative technology, political support, and climate change mitigation goals as important facilitators. The interviewees highlighted the importance of a local perspective and considered each city's preconditions when developing a PED project. The study emphasizes that to facilitate PED implementation and replication in cities, more knowledge and clarity is required about PED such as on the definition and system boundaries.

  • 17.
    Molinari, Marco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    ICT in the built environment: drivers, barriers and uncertainties2017In: Biennial International Workshop Advances in Energy Studies: BIWAES, Graz, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Buildings are major contributors to energy use and environmental impact in developed societies. If theambitious sustainability targets of modern societies are to be met, energy use in the built environmentmust be addressed as a central issue.New momentum on achieving energy efficiency in the building sector has been triggered by informationand communication technology (ICT). New opportunities bringing the concept of smart building closerto reality are offered e.g. by innovative sensing techniques, extensive and cost-efficient data collectionand analysis, advanced controls and artificial intelligence.However, these opportunities are associated with cost and uncertainties regarding whether theinvestment costs are paid back in terms of energy savings, whether indoor comfort and air quality andimproved, the drawbacks in term of increased maintenance effort, complexity, reliability and resilience,the effects in terms of user interaction, how data security is affected and the long-term effects on society.This paper critically analyses recent research findings and reviews the pros and cons of some promisingICT techniques being applied in the building sector. It exemplifies drivers and barriers to implementationof advanced controls and artificial intelligence in buildings, based on findings from two test-beds inStockholm, and discusses the implications of these findings for future research.

  • 18. Morgado, Leonel
    et al.
    Rodrigues, Rui
    Coelho, Antonio
    Magano, Olga
    Calcada, Tania
    Cunha, Paula Trigueiros
    Echave, Cynthia
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Sama, Sara
    Oliver, Jennifer
    Ang, Jim
    Deravi, Farzin
    Bento, Ricardo
    Ramos, Luis
    Cities in citizens' hands2015In: Proceedings Of The 6Th International Conference On Software Development And Technologies For Enhancing Accessibility And Fighting Info-Exclusion, Elsevier BV , 2015, p. 430-438Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new paradigm for public participation in urban planning, a field which presents significant challenges for public understanding and participation. Our approach is based on leveraging the rich diversity of meaning associated with cultural gestures, traditions, folklore, and rituals, and using them in augmented reality systems, in order for citizens' to explore, understand, and communicate the complex, systemic ideas and concepts associated with urban planning. At an immediate level, this approach holds the potential for enabling increased public awareness of what is at stake in urban planning - both on the part of citizens and on the part of public officials, policy-makers, and decision-makers - and consequently enhancing understanding and improving participation in public life and citizenship. It may also open up a new field of research and development in human-computer interaction, to leverage the richness of meaning and modes of expression which exist in various cultures and societies, rather than ignoring them and imposing dumbed-down or prescribed command methods. Thus, it aims to facilitate new levels of empowerment of users in the use of digital systems and data. The active utilization of cultural meaning in gestures, rituals, and social practices may also support and promote better inclusion and participation of minority groups and migrant communities in contemporary, technology-rich life. (c) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 19. Mulder, K. K.
    et al.
    Ferrer-Balas, D.
    Segalas-Coral, J.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nikiforovich, E.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    being scared is not enough! motivators for education for sustainable development2013In: Sustainability Assessment Tools in Higher Education Institutions: Mapping Trends and Good Practices Around the World, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 29-45Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an overview of positive motivators for students, lecturers, and educational managers to prioritize Sustainable Development in education. Very often, we implicitly assume that students and colleagues should all be motivated by the great challenges that the world faces. And if they appear not to react sufficiently to these challenges, we sometimes tend to give these challenges an apocalyptic character. But is this the right motivator for students and colleagues to work on Sustainable Development? We all know that if you only use a stick and no carrot… So why don’t we use more carrots? The bureaucracy that comes with tools for checking/auditing/evaluating the (SD content of) programs/curricula is not particularly a strong motivator for university lecturers. And building courses that add another subject to the erudition of the graduate might not be the right motivators for students that want to make a difference. We are often still in the process of convincing university managers to add SD to the curriculum, convincing colleagues to address SD, and convincing students to pick SD electives and address SD in their projects. How to motivate them to do this when this gives them no direct personal reward and even might increase their workload? The paper will explore options to develop motivating educating by reviewing case studies on educational renewal in four universities. It concludes that there are various options for more motivating education. However, to fully utilize these options, more priority should be given to education.

  • 20. Mulder, Karel F.
    et al.
    Ferrer, Didac
    Segalas Coral, Jordi
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nikiforovich, Eugene
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    Motivating students and lecturers for education in sustainable development2015In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 385-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims at identifying factors that could contribute to the motivation of students in sustainable development (SD) education. The underlying idea of the paper is that SD education is not always as attractive among students and lecturers as many would like it to be. Design/methodology/approach - The paper briefly reviews literature regarding behavioral change for long-term benefits. It identifies four motivators that could be effective to make people pursue longer-term objectives. It identifies if these motivators were present in five cases of successful SD education. Findings - The four motivators for students that were identified in the literature review (a sense of autonomy, a challenge of reflection on the future role, connection with others, self-fulfillment, focus on the individual learning need) could be observed in the cases of successful SD education, although to various degrees. Individual autonomy in learning was not observed, but group autonomy was present in all cases. Research limitations/implications - The case studies were all electives. It is unclear how the motivators could work out in mandatory courses. Moreover, the curriculum as a whole will affect the success of single courses. Successful courses being "the exception" of the curriculum might be judged differently if they would be part of the curriculum in which such courses would be the main stream. Further research is required to check if the motivators are effective in mandatory and not specifically SD-targeted courses. It is also not clear how various motivators could be applied most effectively in a curriculum. Practical implications - The paper gives guidance to lecturers and educational managers to design attractive and effective SD education. Originality/value - The paper treats SD education from a novel perspective: how to convey a credible behavioral message, and how to motivate students for education for SD.

  • 21.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bögel, Paula M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Giersiepen, Annika N.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Exploring the viability of a local social network for creating persistently engaging energy feedback and improved human well-being2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, ISSN 0959-6526, no 224, p. 789-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term engagement of residents is crucial for demand response management, and thus grid stability in energy systems, but current approaches often fail to maintain or even achieve the necessary changes in consumer behaviour. Thus future customer engagement approaches will have to relate more strongly to customer needs in order to achieve long-term engagement. This study presents an approach based on a central need identified in psychological research, namely the need to belong to a group. A mixed methods approach was used to examine how an energy feedback approach that connects to this need could be designed. First, based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Social Identity Theory, a survey was conducted to examine the influence of e.g. norms held by the local social group of neighbours on energy behaviour. In contrast to previous studies on the influence of social groups on sustainable behaviour, no significant influence was found. However, other findings indicated that this was due to the low level of group identity, leading to the assumption that the need for social belonging was not fulfilled in the survey group. Second, focus group discussions were conducted to test this assumption in more detail. Findings from the focus groups confirm the assumption and reveal detailed insights on residential needs for stronger connections between neighbours. We conclude that a local social network could be a suitable solution to the need for local social belonging and, while also providing a context for energy feedback. Thus, implementing a local social network could lead to both persistently engaging energy feedback and also improve human well-being.

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  • 22.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Designing energy feedback for a local social network2019In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 199, p. 88-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaged households are needed for the future ‘smart grids’ to function, but it is difficult to engage residents in their household electricity consumption. Building on earlier research suggesting that a local social network could provide a suitable context for energy feedback, this paper examines how feedback presented in a social network should be designed in order to be better understood by the residents and encourage long-term engagement. A review of the literature on design principles and cases where they had been implemented identified 24 principles. A prototype feedback design adapted for a local social network was made, based on design principles deemed suitable for the screens designed. End-user feedback on the prototype was collected through a stakeholder consultation workshop. In the workshop dis- cussions, 17 identified principles were mentioned and there was support for 15 of these, one was both supported and contested and two were contested. Based on comments and suggestions from end-users, a revised version of the feedback prototype was made for implementation in a pilot study in Sweden and Portugal.

  • 23.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Siepelmeyer, Henrik
    University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Enarsson, David
    LocalLife Sweden AB.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    ‘Pause hours’: a community-based behavioural demand response approach to peak load reduction2022Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Households can provide demand-side flexibility by changing their consumption behaviour and shifting energy-intensive activities – such as vacuuming, cooking or charging electric cars – to off-peak hours. Such behaviour-based demand response management could balance out consumption peaks without the need for costly smart home devices or automation technologies. However, existing research has struggled to motivate consumers to adapt their behaviour or maintain behaviour change over extended periods of time. This field study explored a scalable and cost-effective behavioural demand response tool and investigated its short- and long-term impacts on average and peak hour electricity consumption under realistic conditions: A smartphone app provided users with social comparison feedback on their electricity consumption and invited them to participate in “pause hours” by avoiding energy- intensive activities during peak hours. To appeal even to hard-to-reach energy users and elicit longer-term engagement, the app also contained a neighbourhood newsfeed and was framed as a local social network. In a 15-month trial with 550 student apartments in Sweden, more than half of the residents voluntarily installed the app, many app users stayed engaged over an extended period of time and pause hour participants achieved substantial peak-load consumption reductions of 46% on average. These results indicate that smartphone apps can achieve peak load consumption reduction and long-term engagement, although they may be particularly attractive to already energy efficient households. Avenues for future research are discussed.

  • 24.
    Mäkivierikko, Aram
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Siepelmeyer, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure. Univ Agder, Kristiansand, Norway..
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Enarsson, David
    LocalLife Sweden AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Reducing electricity peak loads through 'pause hours'- a community-based behavioural demand response approach2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 408, article id 137064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Households can provide demand-side flexibility by changing their consumption behaviour and shifting energy-intensive activities - such as vacuuming, cooking or charging electric cars - to off-peak hours. Such behaviour-based demand response management could balance out consumption peaks without the need for costly smart home devices or automation technologies. However, existing research has struggled to motivate consumers to adapt their behaviour or maintain behaviour change over extended periods of time. This field study explored a scalable and cost-effective behavioural demand response tool and investigated its short-and long-term impacts on average and peak hour electricity consumption under realistic conditions: A smartphone app provided users with social comparison feedback on their electricity consumption and invited them to participate in "pause hours" by avoiding energy-intensive activities during peak hours. To appeal even to hard-to-reach energy users and elicit longer-term engagement, the app also contained a neighbourhood newsfeed and was framed as a local social network. In a 15-month trial with 550 student apartments in Sweden, more than half of the residents voluntarily installed the app, many app users stayed engaged over an extended period of time and pause hour participants achieved substantial peak-load consumption reductions of 46% on average. These results indicate that smartphone apps can achieve peak load consumption reduction and long-term engagement, although they may be particularly attractive to already energy efficient households. Avenues for future research are discussed.

  • 25.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Goldenberg, Romain
    Kalantari, Zahra
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Deal, Brian
    University of Illinois Urbana Champaign.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Integrating ecosystem services in the assessment of urban energy trajectories: A study of the Stockholm Region2017In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 100, p. 338-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban development trajectories are changing towards compact, energy-efficient cities and renewable energy sources, and this will strongly affect ecosystem services (ES) that cities are dependent on but tend to disregard. Such ES can be provisioning, regulating and cultural ES, around which competition over land resources will increase with energy system shifts. Much of this can be foreseen to take place within urbanising regions that are simultaneously the living environment of a major part of the human population today. In order to inform critical urban policy decisions, tools for integrated assessment of urban energy and transport options and ecosystem services need to be developed. For this purpose, a case study of the Stockholm region was conducted, analysing three scenarios for the future urbanisation of the region, integrating a transport energy perspective and an ES perspective. The results showed that a dense but polycentric development pattern gives more opportunities for sustainable urban development, while the dense monocentric scenario has apparent drawbacks from an ES perspective. The methodology is compatible with a model integration platform for urban policy support and will thus enable integrated policy assessment of complex urban systems, with the goal of increasing their sustainability.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Finnish Environm Inst SYKE, Environm Policy Ctr, PL 140, Helsinki 00251, Finland.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Brandt, Nils (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga (Contributor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Household responsiveness to residential demand response strategies - Results and policy implications from a Swedish field study2018In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To realize the benefits of smart grids, residential demand response (DR) aims to increase demand flexibility by influence household electricity consumption. Although price-based DR programs have shown potential, there is a need to further investigate the effectiveness of DR in energy strategy and policy development. The evaluation of DR has focused on the impact on overall power demand, assuming that consumers are economically rational decision-maker. However, recent findings suggest that consumer responses have been insufficient and calls have been made to identify novel evaluation approaches that better reflect the human dimension of energy consumption. Continuing this line of enquiry, this paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of DR and explore the potential of environmental incentives for increased consumer engagement. We propose an interdisciplinary evaluation framework to understand variations in household responsiveness to DR strategies, which is tested in a Swedish DR field trial covering 136 households during 2017. Results suggest that the effectiveness of DR varies widely across household type; ranging from substantial reductions in overall consumption and during peak periods, to increases in consumption during peak periods. Furthermore, a clear favor of price incentives, compared to environmental incentives, as the most efficient strategy to increase demand flexibility was observed.

  • 27.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Levihn, Fabian
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Wallin, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Sustainable Building Systems. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Energy Technol ETT, Res Grp Urban Analyt & Transit UrbanT, Brinellvagen 68, S-10144 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Data-driven strategic planning of building energy retrofitting: The case of Stockholm2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 233, p. 546-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C requires a substantial decrease in the average carbon intensity of buildings, which implies a need for decision-support systems to enable large-scale energy efficiency improvements in existing building stock. This paper presents a novel data-driven approach to strategic planning of building energy retrofitting. The approach is based on the urban building energy model (UBEM), using data about actual building heat energy consumption, energy performance certificates and reference databases. Aggregated projections of the energy performance of each building are used for holistic city-level analysis of retrofitting strategies considering multiple objectives, such as energy saving, emissions reduction and required social investment. The approach is illustrated by the case of Stockholm, where three retrofitting packages (heat recovery ventilation; energy-efficient windows; and a combination of these) were considered for multi-family residential buildings constructed 1946-1975. This identified potential for decreasing heat demand by 334 GWh (18%) and consequent emissions reduction by 19.6 kt-CO2 per year. The proposed method allows the change in total energy demand from large-scale retrofitting to be assessed and explores its impact on the supply side. It thus enables more precisely targeted and better coordinated energy efficiency programmes. The case of Stockholm demonstrates the potential of rich urban energy datasets and data science techniques for better decision making and strategic planning.

  • 28.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Wallin, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Data-driven building archetypes for urban building energy modelling2019In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 181, p. 360-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach for using rich datasets to develop different building archetypes depending on the urban energy challenges addressed. Two cases (building retrofitting and electric heating) were analysed using the same city, Stockholm (Sweden), and the same input data, energy performance certificates and heat energy use metering data. The distinctive character of these problems resulted in different modelling workflows and archetypes being developed. The building retrofitting case followed a hybrid approach, integrating statistical and physical perspectives, estimating energy savings for 5532 buildings from seven retrofitting packages. The electric heating case provided an explicitly statistical data-driven view of the problem, estimating potential for improvement of power capacity of the local electric grid at peak electric power of 147 MW. The conclusion was that the growing availability of linked building energy data requires a shift in the urban building energy modelling (UBEM) paradigm from single-logic models to on-request multiple-purpose data intelligence services.

  • 29.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Wallin, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Levihn, Fabian
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). AB Stockholm Exergi, Sweden.
    Shahrokni, Hossein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Energy performance certificates — New opportunities for data-enabled urban energy policy instruments?2019In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, p. 486-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy performance certificates (EPC) were introduced in European Union to support reaching energy efficiency targets by informing actors in the building sector about energy efficiency in buildings. While EPC have become a core source of information about building energy, the domains of its applications have not been studied systematically. This partly explains the limitation of conventional EPC data quality studies that fail to expose the essential problems and secure effective use of the data. This study reviews existing applications of EPC data and proposes a new method for assessing the quality of EPCs using data analytics. Thirteen application domains were identified from systematic mapping of 79 papers, revealing increases in the number and complexity of studies and advances in applied data analysis techniques. The proposed data quality assurance method based on six validation levels was tested using four samples of EPC dataset for the case of Sweden. The analysis showed that EPC data can be improved through adding or revising the EPC features and assuring interoperability of EPC datasets. In conclusion, EPC data have wider applications than initially intended by the EPC policy instrument, placing stronger requirements on the quality and content of the data.

  • 30.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Sustainability through stakeholder learning: Participatory backcasting for the heating sector2017In: 10th BIWAES Biennial International Workshop Advances in Energy Studies: Energy futures, environment and well-being / [ed] Sergio Ulgiati and Laura Vanoli, Budapest, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social learning is an important element of the reflexive governance approaches needed to enable sustainability transitions. One such approach is participatory backcasting (PB), which involves development of a desirable future vision and a pathway towards this vision. Social learning has been reported as an outcome of different PB projects, including those performed in the infrastructure sector. This study examined the importance of sharing and transferring knowledge and new perceptions developed during PB projects among the individuals directly involved in these projects to and within their formal and informal groups and organisations (e.g. local authorities, DH companies, equipment producers, consumer associations). Mechanisms that need to be incorporated into PB processes to support knowledge sharing/transfer were identified as: (1) use of actor role profiles to identify individuals with bridging/connecting/change agent capability for inclusion in a PB process; (2) strong participant engagement in co-creation activities during the PB project; and (3) PB process design to achieve the multiplier effect (e.g. capacity-building workshops for local researchers and authorities). These mechanisms were successfully tested using the case of two PB-based projects seeking sustainability in the heating sector of the Ukrainian city Bila Tserkva and the Serbian city Niš. It was concluded that further investigation of mechanisms for knowledge sharing/transfer and experimentation within PB processes is a promising research area for enabling sustainability transitions in the heating sector.

  • 31.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. Finnish Environment Institute SYKE.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Insights from participatory backcasting for a sustainable heating sector in Niš, Serbia2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Modular participatory backcasting: A unifying framework for strategic planning in the heating sector2019In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 124, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a novel framework, modular participatory backcasting (mPB), for long-term planning in the heating sector. The mPB framework is based on participatory backcasting (PB) and integrates principles of modularity, participatory modelling, and transdisciplinarity. We discerned for mPB 13 modules that can be arranged according to the purpose and specifics of each planning process. The design of the mPB framework and its implementation are presented for the cases of participatory strategic planning processes to achieve sustainable heat provision by 2050 in a Ukrainian city (Bila Tserkva) and a Serbian city (Nis). The results show that mPB allows adaptability to local contexts and limitations through exclusion, augmentation, substitution, splitting and inverting properties of modularity; decreases the learning time for applying the framework in a novel context; increases the reproducibility and transparency of long-term energy planning processes; enables efficient integration of quantitative methods into the participatory process; and advances collaboration between academia and society. The proposed framework is beneficial for advancement of local planning and policy-making practices by creating strategies with a wider support of stakeholders. It could also be useful for further research through cross-case analysis.

  • 33.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Developing urban energy scenarios - morphological analysis in the participatory backcasting framework2015In: Energy and Urban systems / [ed] Kordas and Ulgiati, Stockholm, 2015, p. 235-243Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. Environmental Policy Centre, Finnish Environment Institute SYKE.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Strategic planning for sustainable heating in cities: A morphological method for scenario development and selection2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 186, no Part 2, p. 1115-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition to more sustainable heating systems requires socio-technical approaches to strategic planning. Scenario development plays a key role in strategic planning, as the process supports the development of future visions and actions required for their realisation. However, new approaches to scenario development are required to address the limitations of conventional scenario development methods, such as the cognitive barriers of ‘groupthink’, reluctance to consider ‘outside-the-box’ options, handling of complexity, and ad hoc scenario selection and general non-transparency of scenario development processes. This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel method for scenario development and selection in the context of participatory strategic planning for sustainable heating in cities. The method is based on the morphological approach and a number of scenario criteria including transparency,reliabilitycoveragecompletenessrelevance/densitycreativityinterpretabilityconsistencydifferentiation and plausibility. It integrates creativity workshops and interdisciplinary stakeholder participation to enhance the ownership and legitimacy of the scenarios. The approach entails the generation of a complete space of scenarios for heating systems and reduction of this space using cross-consistency analysis and project-specific requirements. Iterative development and implementation of the method is illustrated using two participatory backcasting projects focused on strategic planning for providing a comfortable indoor climate for Bila Tserkva, Ukraine, and Niš, Serbia by the year 2030. The results demonstrate that the method helps overcome the limitations of conventional approaches to scenario development and supports rigorous and transparent selection of a scenario set for participatory analysis. The method fostered the elicitation of consensus-based scenarios for more sustainable heating systems in both cities with regard to the quality of indoor comfort, environmental impact, resource efficiency and energy security.

  • 35.
    Rohracher, Harald
    et al.
    Tema T - Technology and Social Change, Linköping University, Linköping 58183, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Mohn Centre for Innovation and Regional Development, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Postbox 7030, Bergen 5020, Norway, Postbox 7030; TIK Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1108, Blindern, Oslo 0317, Norway, P.O. Box 1108, Blindern; Melbourne Centre for Cities, The University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia, Grattan Street.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Mission incomplete: Layered practices of monitoring and evaluation in Swedish transformative innovation policy2023In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 336-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and innovation policies (IPs) across Europe, particularly in Sweden, are increasingly framed by an orientation towards societal challenges, missions, and transformative change. Innovation-funding agencies are adapting to these new approaches but struggle with a host of new questions and challenges on how to re-structure public policy interventions and develop new structures for monitoring, learning, and evaluation. In this article, we investigate how this IP paradigm shift is dealt with in the IP discourse and practice in Sweden and how an incomplete shift creates mismatches and tensions with existing structures for programme evaluation and monitoring. Despite the new paradigm, the implementation of evaluation strategies mostly follows a traditional 'summative' framing. The ongoing discussions in Swedish IP demonstrate that a paradigm shift towards transformative innovation cannot unfold its potential unless it is also followed by a shift in the practices of programme implementation and evaluation.

  • 36.
    Soberón, Miguel
    et al.
    Centro de Innovación en Tecnología para el Desarrollo Humano, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (itdUPM), Spain.
    Ezquerra-Lázaro, Irene
    Centro de Innovación en Tecnología para el Desarrollo Humano, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (itdUPM), Spain.
    Sánchez-Chaparro, Teresa
    Centro de Innovación en Tecnología para el Desarrollo Humano, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (itdUPM), Spain;Department of Organizational Engineering, Business Administration and Statistics, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Moreno-Serna, Jaime
    Centro de Innovación en Tecnología para el Desarrollo Humano, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (itdUPM), Spain;Department of Organizational Engineering, Business Administration and Statistics, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Dóci, Gabriella
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Supporting municipalities to develop collaboration capability to facilitate urban transitions and sustainability: Role of transition intermediaries in Madrid2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 426, p. 138964-, article id 138964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition management literature acknowledges that urban transitions are influenced by the interplay between a wide variety of actors operating under network governance. This means that municipalities must move from the traditional roles of commanders or implementers to those of initiators and facilitators of transition initiatives involving multiple actors and sectors. However, the structural and cultural challenges in municipalities hinder their ability to collaborate in network environments. Through a case study, this study analyses the role of transition intermediaries as expert organizations in building collaborations that support municipalities in developing their relational collaboration potential. The results show that besides building successful collaborations, intermediation work should focus on creating inter-organizational spaces where municipalities can learn how to collaborate relationally. However, transition intermediaries do not replace municipalities in their facilitation role in the transition but support them until they are ready to assume that role.

  • 37.
    Ulgiati, Sergio
    et al.
    Parthenope Univ Naples, Dept Sci & Technol, Ctr Direz, Isola C4, I-80143 Naples, Italy..
    Casazza, Marco
    Parthenope Univ Naples, Dept Sci & Technol, Ctr Direz, Isola C4, I-80143 Naples, Italy..
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Vanoli, Laura
    Univ Cassino & Southern Lazio, Dept Civil & Mech Engn, V Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, Italy..
    Basosi, Riccardo
    Univ Siena, Dept Biotechnol Chem & Pharm, Via A De Gasperi 2, I-53100 Siena, Italy..
    Mauro, Alessandro
    Parthenope Univ Napoli, Dept Engn, Ctr Direz, Isola C4, I-80143 Naples, Italy..
    Energy technologies and perspectives for human and environmental wellbeing2019In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 183, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38. Voloshchuk, V.
    et al.
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nikiforovich, E.
    Comprehensive energy and exergy analysis of the Ground Source Heat Pump evaporator2021In: ECOS 2021 - 34th International Conference on Efficency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2021 Program Organizer , 2021, p. 1436-1445Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the elaboration and application of the phenomenological mathematical model of the vertical ground heat source and comprehensive energy and exergy analysis of ground heat source-evaporator system of the ground source heat pump. The novelty of the proposed model, with comparison to the conventional engineering approaches, is derived from the description of a ground source and evaporator as a nonequilibrium thermodynamic system consisting of ground (a source of low temperature energy) and a finite cylindrical borehole filled with fluid (the energy carrier) flowing through it and with continuity of temperature and energy fluxes boundary conditions between ground and fluid. It is shown that the studied problem is characterized by only dimensionless parameter - the ratio of the thermal conductivities of the ground and flowing fluid. The designed mathematical model has been used for study of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of extractable energy. Further, a thermodynamic scheme of the heat pump evaporator as a converter of low potential geothermal energy of secondary fluid into freon energy due to phase transition is proposed. A definition of an exergy efficiency of the evaporator of the ground source heat pump and the fundamental energy characteristic of the ground source of heat have been introduced in the paper and the physical interpretation of the received results has been provided. The designed mathematical model has been used for study of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of extractable energy using exergy analysis. The proposed ground heat source and evaporator models for heat pumps enables the creation of new engineering techniques for calculations of energy capacity of borehole heat exchangers for Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP). Besides, the suggested theory can be used for elaboration of the new scientific–technological approaches to creating optimum strategies for design, control and operation of Heat Pumps.

  • 39. Zivkovic, Marija
    et al.
    Pereverza, Kateryna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Pasichnyi, Oleksii
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Madzarevic, Aleksandar
    Ivezic, Dejan
    Kordas, Olga
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Exploring scenarios for more sustainable heating: The case of Nis, Serbia2016In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 115, p. 1758-1770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability transformation of the heating sector is recognised as being essential for reaching climate and environmental targets while improving the quality of life in cities worldwide. Participatory strategic planning enabled by scenario methods can be an important tool to guide this transformation, but methods for qualitative scenario analysis supporting stakeholder participation must be further developed and tested in the context of different cities. This paper presents results from integration of urban energy system modelling into the participatory strategic planning process implemented in the city of NE, which suffers problems typical of the heating sector in Serbia and the Western Balkans. The aim was to explore how the scenarios developed by local stakeholders could transform the NB heating system by 2030. Five scenarios developed within participatory backcasting project and a BAU scenario were analysed in terms of decarbonisation, energy security and energy efficiency using Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP). A final scenario "Efficiency for the green future" designed by the stakeholders for implementation in the city included high standards of energy efficiency in buildings, increased share of renewables in the heating energy mix, expanding the district heating system, deploying smart technologies and green architecture. The LEAP model demonstrated that this final scenario could lead to achievement of the desirable future vision developed by stakeholders for NB, through substantial improvements in energy efficiency and energy security, and to considerable emissions decreases by 2030 in comparison with the base year (2010) and the BAU scenario.

  • 40.
    Kordas, Olga (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Lazarevic, David (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Linn, Gunnar (Editor)
    Linnkonsult.
    Strategic Innovation Agenda for Smart Sustainable Cities2015Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Kordas, Olga (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Lazarevic, David (Editor)
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Linn, Gunnar (Editor)
    Linnkonsult.
    Strategisk innovationsagenda för Smarta hållbara städer2015Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 41 of 41
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