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  • 1.
    Kontogiorgos, Dimosthenis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Abelho Pereira, André Tiago
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    The Trade-off between Interaction Time and Social Facilitation with Collaborative Social Robots2019In: The Challenges of Working on Social Robots that Collaborate with People, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of social robots and conversational agents is growing at a rapid pace. These agents, however, are still not optimised to simulate key social aspects of situated human conversational environments. Humans are intellectually biased towards social activity when facing more anthropomorphic agents or when presented with subtle social cues. In this paper, we discuss the effects of simulating anthropomorphism and non-verbal social behaviour in social robots and its implications for human-robot collaborative guided tasks. Our results indicate that it is not always favourable for agents to be anthropomorphised or to communicate with nonverbal behaviour. We found a clear trade-off between interaction time and social facilitation when controlling for anthropomorphism and social behaviour.

  • 2.
    Kontogiorgos, Dimosthenis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Abelho Pereira, André Tiago
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    The Effects of Embodiment and Social Eye-Gaze in Conversational Agents2019In: Proceedings of the 41st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of conversational agents is growing at a rapid pace. Agents however, are not optimised to simulate key social aspects of situated human conversational environments. Humans are intellectually biased towards social activity when facing more anthropomorphic agents or when presented with subtle social cues. In this work, we explore the effects of simulating anthropomorphism and social eye-gaze in three conversational agents. We tested whether subjects’ visual attention would be similar to agents in different forms of embodiment and social eye-gaze. In a within-subject situated interaction study (N=30), we asked subjects to engage in task-oriented dialogue with a smart speaker and two variations of a social robot. We observed shifting of interactive behaviour by human users, as shown in differences in behavioural and objective measures. With a trade-off in task performance, social facilitation is higher with more anthropomorphic social agents when performing the same task.

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  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • fi-FI
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