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  • 1.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Ruhr University Bochum, Institute of Geography, Universitätsstr. 150, 44805 Bochum, Germany.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Albert, Christian
    Geneletti, Davide
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Greening cities through urban planning: A literature review on the uptake of concepts and methods in Stockholm2022In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, p. 127584-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature-based solutions (NBS) represent the most recent of several "greening" concepts proposed to support spatial planning and decision-making towards sustainable metropolitan regions. Despite similarities, the concepts stem from different disciplines and policy arenas and reflect various models of people-nature relations. This paper aims to analyze the uptake of greening concepts in scientific planning literature focusing on (urban) nature and landscape in the metropolitan region of Stockholm, Sweden, over the last three decades. It investigates what changes this evolution has brought in terms of the topics adopted, methods applied, and types of planning support put into practice. We identified 574 articles that reflect substantial research on greening concepts in the Swedish planning context. The articles demonstrate an initial prevalence of biodiversity with later increases of interest in ecosystem services and NBS. A detailed analysis of the studies focusing on Stockholm revealed Population growth/densification, Green space management and Biodiversity conservation as the most commonly addressed societal challenges. The most frequently mentioned type of green and blue element is Parks and (semi-)natural urban green areas, including urban forests. Methods applied were mostly quantitative, while mixes with qualitative approaches were only apparent in ecosystem services articles. Half of the studies involved practitioners or decision-makers, but only four seemed related to real-life planning processes. Taken together, the influence of scientific literature on the uptake of greening concepts in spatial planning seems to have been limited. Future mainstreaming of greening concepts in Stockholm and beyond could benefit from available data, methods and experiences, but will require more active translation and boundary management. Further research into science-policy-planning interfaces at city scale is thus imperative to advance more sustainable pathways for people and nature in metropolitan regions.

  • 2.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Geneletti, Davide
    An Operational Approach for Watershed Investments2020In: Ecosystem Services for Urban Water Security: Concepts and Applications in Sub-Saharan Africa, Cham: Springer Nature , 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on Watershed Investments for securing water for cities. It starts with a brief account of the application of ecosystem services for decision-making and a theoretical background of boundary work. Accordingly, it proposes an operational approach developed for designing and assessing impact of watershed iInvestments to secure water for cities. The developed approach distin- guishes between a “strategic” and a “technical” component. The strategic component identifies as key inputs of the process of Watershed Investment design and assess- ment, the definition of objectives and visioning of feasible and desirable scenarios by stakeholders. The technical component applies spatially explicit modelling to design Watershed Investments, hence to model the impacts on selected ecosystem services. The chapter concludes highlighting the potential of the approach to contribute to adaptive management in the urban water sector, by addressing the challenges of linking diverse stakeholders and knowledge system across management levels and institutional boundaries.

  • 3.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Conclusions2020In: Ecosystem Services for Urban Water Security: Concepts and Applications in Sub-Saharan Africa, Cham: Springer Nature , 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter summarizes the main messages of the book, as well as dis- cusses the challenges for future research and practice to contribute to achieving water security and to implementing adaptive management in the urban water sector. Briefly, the first main message is that achieving urbanwater security through adaptive watershed planning and management, in Sub-Saharan Africa context, is a complex issue. Thus, an intuitive and flexible conceptual framework of the urban water sector from an ecosystem services perspective was proposed. It provides an overview of the main challenges and trends that characterize the sector, highlighting the specificities of the Sub-Saharan context, setting the background for further analysis. Second, if properly designed, Watershed Investments can become an important financial and governance mechanism to promote the implementation of adaptive watershed man- agement to achieve urban water security. Third, a good case study application, even if only based on desk research, can serve to inspire stakeholder and possibly prepare the ground for real-life implementation of science-informed measures to promote urban water security alongside other social goals, coordinating ongoing watershed initiatives.

  • 4.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    Department of Civil, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, Trento, 38123, Italy.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Department of Civil, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento, Italy.
    Design and impact assessment of watershed investments: An approach based on ecosystem services and boundary work.2017In: Environmental impact assessment review, ISSN 0195-9255, E-ISSN 1873-6432, Vol. 62, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Watershed investments, whose main aim is to secure water for cities, represent a promising opportunity for large-scale sustainability transitions in the near future. If properly designed, they promote activities in the watershed that enhance ecosystem services while protecting nature and biodiversity, as well as achieving other societal goals. In this paper, we build on the concepts of ecosystem services and boundary work, to develop and test an operative approach for designing and assessing the impact of watershed investments. The approach is structured to facilitate negotiations among stakeholders. Its strategic component includes setting the agenda; defining investment scenarios; and assessing the performance of watershed investments as well as planning for a follow-up. Its technical component concerns data processing; tailoring spatially explicit ecosystem service models; hence their application to design a set of “investment portfolios”, generate future land use scenarios, and model impacts on selected ecosystem services. A case study illustrates how the technical component can be developed in a data scarce context in sub-Saharan Africa in a way that is functional to support the steps of the strategic component. The case study addresses soil erosion and water scarcity-related challenges affecting Asmara, a medium-sized city in Eritrea, and considers urban water security and rural poverty alleviation as two illustrative objectives, within a ten-year planning horizon. The case study results consist in spatially explicit data (investment portfolio, land use scenario, impact on ecosystem services), which were aggregated to quantitatively assess the performance of different watershed investments scenarios, in terms of changes in soil erosion control. By addressing stakeholders' concerns of credibility, saliency, and legitimacy, the approach is expected to facilitate negotiation of objectives, definition of scenarios, and assessment of alternative watershed investments, ultimately, to contribute to implementing an adaptive watershed management.

  • 5.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Designing Watershed Investments for Asmara and the Toker Watershed2020In: Ecosystem Services for Urban Water Security: Concepts and Applications in Sub-Saharan Africa, Cham: Springer Nature , 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an application of a novel operational approach for designing and assessing the impacts ofWatershed Investments, developed in Chap. 3, to the Asmara and Toker Watershed case study. Assuming urban water security and rural poverty alleviation as two objectives for Watershed Investments, the case study application explores all the steps ofthe proposed approach. The results ofthe applica- tion include spatially explicit data that allowquantitatively assessing the performance of differentWatershed Investment scenarios in terms of changes in a selected ecosys- tem service, answering to important planning and management questions. The appli- cation to the Asmara and Toker Watershed case study also highlights the challenges of addressing stakeholders’ concerns through relevant boundary work strategies.

  • 6.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.
    Introduction2020In: Ecosystem Services for Urban Water Security: Concepts and Applications in Sub-Saharan Africa, Cham: Springer Nature , 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter sets the context of the book by providing a brief account of the challenges and opportunities of urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on the urban water sector. Watershed investments are here emphasized as a promising opportunity to effect large-scale transformative change promoting human wellbeing while conserving life-supporting ecosystems. The chapter concludes by illustrating the three specific objectives of the book.

  • 7. Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Knowledge transfer and capacity building: an example from the urban water sector2018In: JUNCO Journal of Universities and international development Cooperation, ISSN 2531-8772, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural-to-urban migration and sustained natural population growth in Africa, if not properly addressed, may pose serious threat to ecosystems and human wellbeing, both locally and afar. Novel concepts and operative approaches are needed to better frame these challenges and support local decision-making processes, to promote sustainable development. Indeed, this is a key area in which the Academia can make a significant contribution, for example, exploring innovative concepts and developing related approaches to support decision-making processes at a local scale. This paper focuses on the urban water sector as an informative example, ultimately aiming to highlight key areas in which research can provide concrete and valuable assistance. More specifically, we introduce two innovative concepts, i.e. ecosystem services and boundary work; hence propose an operative approach to support the process of design and assessment of the impact of watershed investments. To illustrate real-life implementation of the approach in a data scarce context in sub-Saharan Africa, we consider as a case study soil erosion and water scarcity-related challenges affecting Asmara, a medium-sized city in Eritrea. Accordingly, we adopt urban water security and rural poverty alleviation as two illustrative objectives, within a ten-year planning horizon. The case study application resulted in spatially explicit outputs that inform decision-making processes. By timely addressing stakeholders' concerns of credibility, saliency, and legitimacy, the proposed approach is expected to facilitate negotiation of objectives, definition of scenarios, and assessment of alternative watershed investments. Above all, and beyond the urban water sector, the case study application helps highlighting key areas in which the academic work can make concrete contribution mainly in terms of knowledge transfer and capacity building.

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  • 8.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    Univ Trento, Dept Civil Environm & Mech Engn, Trento, Italy..
    Geneletti, Davide
    Multi-criteria decision analysis for nature conservation: A review of 20 years of applications2018In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, p. 42-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a method to support decision-making, by exploring the balance between the pros and cons of different alternatives to ac- complish a specific goal. It assists in framing decision problems, illustrating the per- formance of alternatives across criteria, exploring trade-offs, formulating a decision and testing its robustness. This paper provides a structured review of empirical applications of MCDA to nature conservation published in the scientific literature over the last 20 years. The paper aims at taking stock of past experiences, and comparing them with best practices and common pitfalls identified in the literature, to provide recommendations for better MCDA application to conservation.

    2. The review follows the structure of a generalized MCDA process consisting of three key stages: (1) decision context and problem structuring, (2) analysis and (3) decision.

    3. The search identified 86 papers that describe MCDA applications to a range of top- ics, including conservation prioritization and planning; protected areas management and zoning; forest management and restoration; and mapping of biodiversity, naturalness and wilder. The results show that, concerning problem structuring, a small percentage of the reviewed MCDA engaged stakeholders other than the authors in identifying alternatives and formulating criteria (15% and 35% respectively). Concerning the analysis, criteria assessment was adequately justified by the authors (47%), at times also by involving other stakeholders (22%). Weighting was per- formed in almost all applications, whereas criteria aggregation was mostly based on the weighted linear combination (63%). Sensitivity analysis was largely overlooked (57%). Concerning decision, 45% of the articles provided only an overall ranking or suitability of alternatives, while 22% included additional rankings according to spe- cific criterion, and 8% further analyses and clustering of stakeholders’ preferences.

    4. The paper concludes by suggesting key elements of successful MCDA applications, including clear construction of the decision context; collaborative identification of alternatives and criteria that reflect the values at stake; adequate justification and communication of the methods for criteria assessment and weighting; reasoned choice of the criteria aggregation method, and comprehensive sensitivity analysis.

  • 9.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    Univ Trento, Dept Civil Environm & Mech Eng.
    Geneletti, Davide
    Univ Trento, Dept Civil Environm & Mech Eng.
    Albert, Christian
    Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Environm Planning, Herrenhauser Str 2, D-30419 Hannover, Germany; UFZ Helmholtz Ctr Environm Res, Dept Environm Polit, Permoserstr 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany.
    Boundary work for implementing adaptive management: A water sector application2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 593-594, p. 274-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boundary work, defined as effort to mediate between knowledge and action, is a promising approach for facilitating knowledge co-production for sustainable development. Here, we investigate a case study of knowledge co-production, to assess the applicability of boundary work as a conceptual framework to support implementing adaptive management in the water sector. We refer to a boundary work classification recently proposed by Clark et al., (2016), based on three types of knowledge uses, i.e. enlightenment, decision-, and negotiation-support, and three types of sources, i.e. personal expertise, single, and multiple communities of expertise. Our empirical results confirm boundary work has been crucial for the three types of knowledge use. For enlightenment and decision support, effective interaction among knowledge producers and users was achieved through diverse boundary work practices, including joint agenda setting, and sharing of data and expertise. This initial boundary work eased subsequent knowledge co-production for decision-support and negotiations, in combination with stepping up of cooperation between relevant actors, suitable legislation and pressure for problem solving. Our analysis highlighted the temporal dimension matters-building trust around enlightenment first, and then using this as a basis for managing knowledge co-production for decision-, and negotiation support. We reconfirmed that boundary work is not a single time achievement, rather is a dynamic process, and we emphasized the importance of key actors driving the process, such as water utilities. Our results provide a rich case study of how strategic boundary work can facilitate knowledge co-production for adaptive management in the water sector. The boundary work practices employed here could also be transferred to other cases. Water utilities, as intermediaries between providers and beneficiaries of the important water-related ecosystem service of clean water provision, can indeed serve as key actors for initiating such boundary work practices. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  • 10.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Suleiman, Lina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Analyzing Evidence of Sustainable Urban Water Management Systems: A Review through the Lenses of Sociotechnical Transitions2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 4481-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability concerns and multiple socio‐environmental pressures have necessitated a shift towards Sustainable Urban Water Management (SUWM) systems. Viewing SUWM systems as sociotechnical, this paper departs from eight factors previously identified by transition research: Pressures, Context, Purposes, Actors, Instruments, Processes, Outputs, and Outcomes as a methodological framework for a structured review of 100 articles. The study seeks to analyze empirical cases of planning and implementing SUWM systems worldwide. A wide range of public actors—driven by social and environmental factors rather than by economic pressures—have initiated SUWM projects so as to locally fulfill defined social and environmental purposes. We provide evidence on the emergence of new actors, such as experts, users, and private developers, as well as on the diverse and innovative technical and societal instruments used to promote and implement SUWM systems. We also explore their contexts and institutional capacity to deal with pressures and to mobilize significant financial and human resources, which is in itself vital for the transition to SUWM. Planned or implemented SUWM outputs are divided into green (wet ponds, raingardens, and green roofs) and gray (rain barrels and porous pavements) measures. The outcomes of SUWM projects— in terms of societal and technical learning, and their institutional uptakes—are often implicit or lacking, which seemingly reduces the rate of desirable change.

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  • 11. Burkhard, Benjamin
    et al.
    Maes, Joachim
    Potschin-Young, Marion
    Santos-Martín, Fernando
    Geneletti, Davide
    Stoev, Pavel
    Kopperoinen, Leena
    Adamescu, Cristian
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Arany, Ildikó
    Arnell, Andy
    Balzan, Mario
    Barton, David N.
    van Beukering, Pieter
    Bicking, Sabine
    Borges, Paulo
    Borisova, Bilyana
    Braat, Leon
    M Brander, Luke
    Bratanova-Doncheva, Svetla
    Broekx, Steven
    Brown, Claire
    Cazacu, Constantin
    Crossman, Neville
    Czúcz, Bálint
    Dan\vek, Jan
    de Groot, Rudolf
    Depellegrin, Daniel
    Dimopoulos, Panayotis
    Elvinger, Nora
    Erhard, Markus
    Fagerholm, Nora
    Frélichová, Jana
    Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne
    Grudova, Margarita
    Haines-Young, Roy
    Inghe, Ola
    Kallay, Tamas
    Kirin, Tamara
    Klug, Hermann
    Kokkoris, Ioannis
    Konovska, Iskra
    Kruse, Marion
    Kuzmova, Iliyana
    Lange, Manfred
    Liekens, Inge
    Lotan, Alon
    Lowicki, Damian
    Luque, Sandra
    Marta-Pedroso, Cristina
    Mizgajski, Andrzej
    Mononen, Laura
    Mulder, Sara
    Müller, Felix
    Nedkov, Stoyan
    Nikolova, Mariana
    Östergård, Hannah
    Penev, Lyubomir
    Pereira, Paulo
    Pitkänen, Kati
    Plieninger, Tobias
    Rabe, Sven-Erik
    Reichel, Steffen
    Roche, Philip
    Rusch, Graciela
    Ruskule, Anda
    Sapundzhieva, Anna
    Sepp, Kalev
    Sieber, Ina
    Šmid Hribar, Mateja
    Stašová, Simona
    Steinhoff-Knopp, Bastian
    St\cepniewska, Ma\lgorzata
    Teller, Anne
    Vackar, David
    van Weelden, Martine
    Veidemane, Kristina
    Vejre, Henrik
    Vihervaara, Petteri
    Viinikka, Arto
    Villoslada, Miguel
    Weibel, Bettina
    Zulian, Grazia
    Mapping and assessing ecosystem services in the EU - Lessons learned from the ESMERALDA approach of integration2018In: One Ecosystem, ISSN 2367-8194, Vol. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union (EU) Horizon 2020 Coordination and Support Action ESMERALDA aimed at developing guidance and a flexible methodology for Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services (MAES) to support the EU member states in the implementation of the EU Biodiversity Strategy’s Target 2 Action 5. ESMERALDA’s key tasks included network creation, stakeholder engagement, enhancing ecosystem services mapping and assessment methods across various spatial scales and value domains, work in case studies and support of EU member states in MAES implementation. Thus ESMERALDA aimed at integrating various project outcomes around four major strands: i) Networking, ii) Policy, iii) Research and iv) Application. The objective was to provide guidance for integrated ecosystem service mapping and assessment that can be used for sustainable decision-making in policy, business, society, practice and science at EU, national and regional levels. This article presents the overall ESMERALDA approach of integrating the above-mentioned project components and outcomes and provides an overview of how the enhanced methods were applied and how they can be used to support MAES implementation in the EU member states. Experiences with implementing such a large pan-European Coordination and Support Action in the context of EU policy are discussed and recommendations for future actions are given.

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  • 12. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Guidelines and recommendations to support the application of the final methods: Deliverable D5.4  EU Horizon 2020 ESMERALDA Project, Grant agreement No. 6420072018Report (Refereed)
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  • 13. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    University of Trento.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Identifying representative case studies for ecosystem services mapping and assessment across Europe2018In: One Ecosystem, ISSN 2367-8194, Vol. 3, no iiArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key task in the ESMERALDA project dealt with identifying appropriate case studies to test the ’flexible methodology’ in its different stages of development. Case studies consist of working examples in which mapping and assessment of ecosystem services were applied to address specific decision-making problems. Testing is understood as an iterative process of co-learning that involves project partners and stakeholders, enabling the refinement of the ’flexible methodology’ and the development of guidelines to support its application. Testing is conducted through a series of workshops in different European contexts, each addressing a different set of themes and regions.

  • 14. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Liekens, Inge
    Broekx, Steven
    Kallay, Tamas Kristof
    Arany, Ildikó
    Viinikka, Arto
    Kopperoinen, Leena
    Svensson, Johan
    Klug, Hermann
    Reichel, Steffen
    Potschin-Young, Marion
    Martín, Fernando Santos
    Stoev, Pavel
    Maes, Joachim
    Burkhard, Benjamin
    Report illustrating the application of the final methods in policy and decision-making: Deliverable D5.3, EU Horizon 2020 ESMERALDA Project, Grant agreement No. 642007.2018Report (Refereed)
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  • 15. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Scolozzi, Rocco
    Assandri, Giacomo
    Brambilla, Mattia
    Pedrini, Paolo
    Modelling Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Trade-Offs in Agricultural Landscapes to Support Planning and Policy-Making2020In: Landscape Modelling and Decision Support / [ed] Mirschel, Wilfried; Terleev, Vitaly V.; Wenkel, Karl-Otto, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 421-441Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural areas provide non-commodity outputs besides food and fiber that can contribute to sustainability. Balancing the interest of farmers and the benefits for the society is a key challenge. Assessing the potential benefits for biodiversity and understanding spatial and temporal trade-offs among multiple ecosystem services (ES) from agricultural areas remain a key challenge, especially in mountainous landscapes. We develop an approach to assess the trade-offs and synergies between ES and biodiversity associated with agricultural areas, focusing on mountain landscapes. We first model the distribution of ES and biodiversity in seven study areas in northern Italy, aiming at providing guidance on the relationship between the intensity of use of agricultural land and the provision of ES. We then performed a thematic aggregation of the indicators and correlation analysis followed to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal ES trade-offs. Finally, we discuss how the results can provide support to planning and policy-making in different sectors, with a focus on rural development and nature conservation planning.

  • 16. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Applying Ecosystem Services to Support Planning Decisions: A Case Study2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 43-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 17. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Conclusions2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 67-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 18. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Developing Ecosystem Service Models for Urban Planning: A Focus on Micro-Climate Regulation2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 31-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 19. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Introduction2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human life on Earth depends on ecosystems. This is the main message conveyed by the concept of ecosystem services (ES), which has gained an ever-increasing attention in the scientific (McDonough et al. 2017) and policy debate (e.g., CBD 2011; European Commission 2006, 2010) of the last two decades. The success of the term ‘ecosystem services’ is arguably due to its encompassing all “the direct and indirect contributions of ecosystems to human wellbeing” (TEEB 2010a), thus providing a comprehensive framework to describe the multiple relationships between humans and nature.

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  • 20. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities2020Book (Refereed)
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  • 21. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Reviewing Ecosystem Services in Urban Climate Adaptation Plans2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 21-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 22. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Reviewing Ecosystem Services in Urban Plans2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 7-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 23. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Cortinovis, Chiara
    Zardo, Linda
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Towards Equity in the Distribution of Ecosystem Services in Cities2020In: Planning for Ecosystem Services in Cities / [ed] Geneletti, Davide; Cortinovis, Chiara; Zardo, Linda; Adem Esmail, Blal, Springer International Publishing , 2020, p. 57-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 24. Geneletti, Davide
    et al.
    Scolozzi, Rocco
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    Assessing ecosystem services and biodiversity tradeoffs across agricultural landscapes in a mountain region2018In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, ISSN 2151-3732, E-ISSN 2151-3740, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 188-208Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 25. Mukherjee, Nibedita
    et al.
    Zabala, Aiora
    Huge, Jean
    Ochieng Nyumba, Tobias
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    University of Trento.
    Sutherland, William J.
    Comparison of techniques for eliciting views and judgements in decision‐making2018In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Decision-making is a complex process that typically includes a series of stages: identifying the issue, considering possible options, making judgements and then making a decision by combining information and values. The current status quo relies heavily on the informational aspect of decision-making with little or no emphasis on the value positions that affect decisions.

    2. There is increasing realization of the importance of adopting rigorous methods for each stage such that the information, views and judgements of stakeholders and experts are used in a systematic and repeatable manner. Though there are several methodological textbooks which discuss a plethora of social science techniques, it is hard to judge the suitability of any given technique for a given decision problem.

    3. In decision-making, the three critical aspects are “what” decision is to be made, “who” makes the decisions and “how” the decisions are made. The methods covered in this paper focus on “how” decisions can be made. We compare six techniques: Focus Group Discussion (FGD), Interviews, Q methodology, Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA), Nominal Group Technique and the Delphi technique specifically in the context of biodiversity conservation. All of these techniques (with the exception of MCDA) help in understanding human values and the underlying perspectives which shape decisions.

    4. Based on structured reviews of 423 papers covering all six methods, we compare the conceptual and logistical characteristics of the methods, and map their suitability for the different stages of the decision- making process. While interviews and FGD are well-known, techniques such the Nominal Group technique and Q methodology are relatively under- used. In situations where conflict is high, we recommend using the Q methodology and Delphi technique to elicit judgements. Where conflict is low, and a consensus is needed urgently, the Nominal Group technique may be more suitable.

    5. We present a nuanced synthesis of methods aimed at users. The comparison of the different techniques might be useful for project managers, academics or practitioners in the planning phases of their projects and help in making better informed methodological choices.

  • 26. Rigon, Riccardo
    et al.
    Tamanini, David
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Simoni, Silvia
    Manuale utente Trento_P2006Other (Other academic)
  • 27. Spyra, Marcin
    et al.
    Kleemann, Janina
    Cetin, Nuket Ipek
    Vázquez Navarrete, Cesar Jesús
    Albert, Christian
    Palacios-Agundez, Igone
    Ametzaga-Arregi, Ibone
    La Rosa, Daniele
    Rozas-Vásquez, Daniel
    Adem Esmail, Blal
    University of Trento.
    Picchi, Paolo
    Geneletti, Davide
    König, Hannes J
    Koo, HongMi
    Kopperoinen, Leena
    Fürst, Christine
    The ecosystem services concept: a new Esperanto to facilitate participatory planning processes?2018In: Landscape Ecology, ISSN 0921-2973, E-ISSN 1572-9761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several case studies investigated the role of ecosystem services in participatory planning processes. However, no systematic study exists that cuts across a large number of empirical cases to identify the implications of using ecosystem services in participatory planning.

1 - 27 of 27
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