kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Vanhuyse, Fedra
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality2022In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 87, p. 104245-104245, article id 104245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As cities worldwide implement strategies to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy (CE), there is an increasing need for tools to monitor progress. However, a standardised metric for CE monitoring in urban areas is lacking. This study examines the potential of the EU Circular Economy Monitoring Framework (CEMF), an established indicator-based framework for measuring national- and EU-level circularity performance, as a monitoring tool for urban areas. For this purpose, available data sources that can support the framework's application at the urban level are mapped, and data quality is assessed following the pedigree matrix approach. Next, the CEMF indicators are computed for the urban area of Umeå, Sweden. The mapping showed limited availability of urban-level data, necessitating the downscaling of national-level data using proxy factors. Most available urban-level data are of high quality, while the quality of national-level data is reduced when used to compute indicators at the urban level. The application of the CEMF in Umeå indicates that there are areas where the municipality performs well, though further improvements are needed. We conclude that the CEMF has potential as a monitoring tool for urban areas. However, improvements in CEMF...s scope and data availability are recommended.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Karagiannidis, A.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Perkoulidis, G.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Sanida, G.
    3rd Health Region Administration (Macedonia), Greece.
    Samaras, P.
    Technological Education Institution of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Greece.
    A multi-criteria assessment of scenarios on thermal processing of infectious hospital wastes: A case study for Central Macedonia2010In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 251-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Emerging technologies for climate-neutral urban areas: An Industrial Ecology perspective2021Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ever-increasing concentration of human activity in urban areas induces environmental problems beyond their boundaries on scales ranging from local to regional to global, such as resource depletion, land degradation, air and water pollution and climate change. Human-induced climate change is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest sustainability challenges of the present century and it is inextricably linked to urbanization. As a response to climate change, urban areas around the world have committed to reach climate neutrality within the next decades. In this context, the deployment of new technologies can have a key role in achieving carbon neutrality in urban areas. As new technologies emerge, it is essential to assess their environmental performance considering the broader systems context in order to ensure that they can indeed contribute to achieving climate neutrality without compromising environmental sustainability.

    This thesis aims is to provide insight on the environmental performance of emerging technologies that can be deployed in urban areas in order to contribute to achieving climate neutrality. The two technologies in focus are grid-connected solar microgrids and biochar-based systems for treatment of biomass waste and remediation of contaminated soil. The methods applied to conduct the environmental assessments and fulfil the aim of the thesis are: case studies, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material and Energy Flow Analysis and Substance Flow Analysis. Moreover, as part of the research efforts, a spreadsheet model based on LCA data was developed.

    The assessment of the solar microgrid highlighted the importance of using explicit spatial and temporal boundaries when analyzing the environmental performance of energy systems, as it can increase the accuracy of the results. It also revealed that the choice of modeling approach can influence the results of the assessment, which motivates the application of different methodological approaches. Within this context, the assessment showed that in a short-term perspective the integration of a grid-connected urban solar microgrid into the Swedish electricity grid would not contribute to climate change mitigation, as solar electricity from the microgrid would displace grid electricity with lower carbon intensity. The assessment also indicated that operational and structural changes in the microgrid could reduce its climate change impact, albeit not to the extent to generate GHG emission abatements.

    The assessment of the biochar-based systems showed that these systems have many environmental benefits compared to incineration of waste and landfilling of contaminated soil. They have great potential to contribute to achieving climate neutrality, as they can provide net negative GHG emissions, owing mainly to carbon sequestration in the biochar. Between the two biochar-based systems, a system for on-site remediation can provide additional environmental benefits, as it can lead to more efficient use of resources. However, these systems also entail environmental trade-offs due to increased consumption of auxiliary electricity, while the extent of ecological and human health risks associated with the reuse of biochar-remediated soils is for the moment unknown.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Ashok, Archana
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Hashemi Farzad, Tabassom
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Climate change impact of integrating a solar microgrid system into the Swedish electricity grid2020In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 268, article id 114981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microgrids are small-scale electricity networks that integrate distributed electricity generation with consumers and, potentially, with storage devices. There is growing interest in these systems, as they can offer solutions for electrification of remote areas, deployment of distributed renewable energy resources, and decarbonization of electricity supply. However, the potential benefits of microgrids in terms of climate change mitigation have not yet been thoroughly assessed. In this study, Life Cycle Assessment was performed to determine the climate change impact of integrating a solar microgrid system in western Sweden into the Swedish electricity grid. To determine whether replacement of grid electricity with electricity from the microgrid can lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, average and marginal GHG emission factors (EFs) for electricity use were estimated with explicit spatial and temporal resolution, using historical data on electricity generation and trade, and life cycle EFs for electricity generation technologies. The assessment, with both marginal and average EFs, showed that integration of the microgrid into the Swedish electricity grid did not provide GHG emissions abatements, as the electricity from the microgrid displaced grid electricity with lower carbon intensity. It was found that a microgrid without batteries would have lower climate change impact, but would still fail to lower overall GHG emissions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the methodological approach used for estimation of EFs and the definition of spatial boundaries could influence the obtained results.

  • 5.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Azzi, Elias Sebastian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Enell, Anja
    Swedish Geotechnical Institute (SGI), SE-581 93 Linköping, Swede.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Biochar produced from wood waste for soil remediation in Sweden: Carbon sequestration and other environmental impacts2021In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of biochar to stabilize soil contaminants is emerging as a technique for remediation of contaminated soils. In this study, an environmental assessment of systems where biochar produced from wood waste with energy recovery is used for remediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and metal(loid)s was performed. Two soil remediation options with biochar (on- and off-site) are considered and compared to landfilling. The assessment combined material and energy flow analysis (MEFA), life cycle assessment (LCA), and substance flow analysis (SFA). The MEFA indicated that on-site remediation can save fuel and backfill material compared to off-site remediation and landfilling. However, the net energy production by pyrolysis of wood waste for biochar production is 38% lower than incineration. The LCA showed that both on-site and off-site remediation with biochar performed better than landfilling in 10 of the 12 environmental impact categories, with on-site remediation performing best. Remediation with biochar provided substantial reductions in climate change impact in the studied context, owing to biochar carbon sequestration being up to 4.5 times larger than direct greenhouse gas emissions from the systems. The two biochar systems showed increased impacts only in ionizing radiation and fossils because of increased electricity consumption for biochar production. They also resulted in increased biomass demand to maintain energy production. The SFA indicated that leaching of PAH from the remediated soil was lower than from landfilled soil. For metal(loid)s, no straightforward conclusion could be made, as biochar had different effects on their leaching and for some elements the results were sensitive to water infiltration assumptions. Hence, the reuse of biocharremediated soils requires further evaluation, with site-specific information. Overall, in Sweden's current context, the biochar remediation technique is an environmentally promising alternative to landfilling worth investigating further.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Barton, J. R.
    School of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Leeds, UK.
    Karagiannidis, A.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Assessment of the greenhouse effect impact of technologies used for energy recovery from municipal waste: A case for England2009In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 90, no 10, p. 2999-3012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waste management activities contribute to global greenhouse gas emissions approximately by 4%. In particular the disposal of waste in landfills generates methane that has high global warming potential. Effective mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions is important and could provide environmental benefits and sustainable development, as well as reduce adverse impacts on public health. The European and UK waste policy force sustainable waste management and especially diversion from landfill, through reduction, reuse, recycling and composting, and recovery of value from waste. Energy from waste is a waste management option that could provide diversion from landfill and at the same time save a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions, since it recovers energy from waste which usually replaces an equivalent amount of energy generated from fossil fuels. Energy from waste is a wide definition and includes technologies such as incineration of waste with energy recovery, or combustion of waste-derived fuels for energy production or advanced thermal treatment of waste with technologies such as gasification and pyrolysis, with energy recovery. The present study assessed the greenhouse gas emission impacts of three technologies that could be used for the treatment of Municipal Solid Waste in order to recover energy from it. These technologies are Mass Burn Incineration with energy recovery, Mechanical Biological Treatment via bio-drying and Mechanical Heat Treatment, which is a relatively new and uninvestigated method, compared to the other two. Mechanical Biological Treatment and Mechanical Heat Treatment can turn Municipal Solid Waste into Solid Recovered Fuel that could be combusted for energy production or replace other fuels in various industrial processes. The analysis showed that performance of these two technologies depends strongly on the final use of the produced fuel and they could produce GHG emissions savings only when there is end market for the fuel. On the other hand Mass Burn Incineration generates greenhouse gas emission savings when it recovers electricity and heat. Moreover the study found that the expected increase on the amount of Municipal Solid Waste treated for energy recovery in England by 2020 could save greenhouse gas emission, if certain Energy from Waste technologies would be applied, under certain conditions.

  • 7.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Vanhuyse, F.
    Mapping and assessing indicator-based frameworks for monitoring Circular Economy development at the city-level2021In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 75, article id 103378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a circular economy (CE) is increasingly recognized as a promising pathway to tackle pressing sustainability challenges at the city-level. Indicator-based frameworks, that is, integrated systems of indicators, are considered as useful tools for monitoring this transition. Yet, studies that map and assess such frameworks are scanty. This article addresses this gap by assessing 15 indicator-based frameworks applicable to measure circularity at the city-level. The identified frameworks were assessed using eight criteria (transparency, stakeholder engagement, effective communication, ability to track temporal changes, applicability, alignment with CE principles, validity and relevance to sustainable development). Additionally, 12 validity requirements were defined to assess to what extent the indicators in the frameworks reflect CE aspects. The assessment reveals a wide variation regarding the extent to which the frameworks match the criteria with none of them satisfying all. In addition, in terms of validity criterion, none includes indicators that fulfill all the validity requirements. Furthermore, most frameworks consist mainly of environmental indicators and only three include indicators reflecting aspects related to the four pillars of sustainable development (environmental, social, economic and governance). Further research could develop a standardized framework for measuring circularity at the city-level and improving existing frameworks.

  • 8.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Karagiannidis, A.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Barton, J. R.
    School of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Leeds, UK.
    Kalogirou, E.
    SYNERGIA, Greece.
    Municipal solid waste management scenarios for Attica and their greenhouse gas emission impact2009In: Waste Management & Research, ISSN 0734-242X, E-ISSN 1096-3669, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 928-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disposal of municipal solid waste in sanitary landfills is still the main waste management method in the Attica region, as in most regions of Greece. Nevertheless, diversion from landfilling is being promoted by regional plans, in which the perspectives of new waste treatment technologies are being evaluated. The present study aimed to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions impact of different municipal solid waste treatment technologies currently under assessment in the new regional plan for Attica. These technologies are mechanical-biological treatment, mass-burn incineration and mechanical treatment and have been assessed in the context of different scenarios. The present study utilized existing methodologies and emission factors for the quantification of GHG emissions from the waste management process and found that all technologies under assessment could provide GHG emission savings. However, the performance and ranking of these technologies is strongly dependent on the existence of end markets for the waste-derived fuels produced by the mechanical-biological treatment processes. In the absence of these markets the disposal of these fuels would be necessary and thus significant GHG savings would be lost.

  • 9.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Frostell, B.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    A new physical accounting model for material flows in urban systems with application to the Stockholm Royal Seaport District2019In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable urbanization requires streamlining of resource management in urban systems which in turn requires understanding of urban metabolism (UM). Even though various methods have been applied for UM analysis, to date there is no standardized method for comprehensive accounting of material flows in urban systems. Moreover, the accounting of material flows is rarely implemented with a bottom-up approach that can provide a thorough analysis of UM. This article presents the Urban Accounting Model (UAM) which aims to allow comprehensive accounting of urban material flows based on a bottom-up approach. The model comprises two interlinked sub-models. The first was developed by integrating a new physical input output table (PIOT) framework for urban systems into a three-dimensional structure. The second comprises a set of physical accounts for systematic accounting of material flows of each economic sector in the system in order to support the compilation of the PIOTs. The functions of the UAM were explored through its application to two urban neighborhoods in the Stockholm Royal Seaport district. The application highlighted that the UAM can describe the physical interactions between the urban system and the environment or other socioeconomic systems, and capture the intersectoral flows within the system. Moreover, its accounts provide information that allow an in-depth analysis of the metabolism of specific sectors. Overall, the UAM can function as a useful tool for UM analysis as it systematizes data collection and at the same time depicts the physical reality of the urban system.

  • 10.
    Perkoulidis, G.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Karagiannidis, A.
    Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Kalogirou, S.
    SYNERGIA, Greece.
    Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives2010In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1395-1406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf