kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Utilizing Biopolymers in 3D Tumor Modeling and Tumor Diagnosis2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer represents a significant global public health challenge and ranks as the second mostcommon cause of death in the United States. The onset of cancer entails an initial phasewhere cells lose their polarity and disconnect from the normal basement membrane, allowingthem to form distinct three-dimensional (3D) configurations that interact with adjacent cellsand the surrounding microenvironment. Cells grown in 2D monolayers demonstrate differentgene expression patterns and different activation of signaling pathways compared to cellscultivated within the natural structure of tumor tissue of the same cell type. Multicellulartumor spheroids (MCTS) are extensively investigated as a well-studied model of organotypiccancer. These spheroids are formed by tumor cells, either alone or in combination with othercell types, and they can be created with or without the application of supportive scaffolds.The MCTSs are also considered promising models for preclinical assessments of chemosensitivity.However, the creation of these tumor spheroids presents challenges, as not alltumor cell lines can consistently form regular spheroids.Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have become essential as a sustainable and environmentallyfriendly material. For example, thin films, with inherent mechanical properties, and flexibility,offer versatility across various applications. Also known for its biocompatibility and non-toxicnature, native CNF is a natural option to use. Its fibrous structure closely mimics the collagenmatrix in human tissue, showing potential as an effective scaffold for 3D cell culture. In thisregard, an innovative Layer-by-Layer (LbL) coating technique using CNF-polyelectrolytebilayers was investigated to generate spheroids. This method constructs bilayers of CNFand polyelectrolytes and can coat various surfaces. In this thesis, the first focus was ondemonstrating the spheroid formation capability using low molecular weight polyelectrolytesin LbL assembly. Secondly, an investigation was conducted involving embedding of LbLgrownspheroids in a decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) aiming to determine howECM, possessing suitable mechanical characteristics, could influence the cancer stem celltraits in spheroids. Thirdly, the thesis demonstrated the utilization of LbL for capturing andreleasing of circulating tumor cells. Lastly, the shift from using low molecular weightpolyelectrolytes in the LbL assembly to high molecular weight counterparts and analyzingthe differences in spheroid formation abilities to assess the underlying differences inmolecular weights of the polyelectrolytes was explored. All-in-all, employing the CNF-basedLbL surface coating strategy explored in the thesis has proven to be promising for thedevelopment of spheroid models closely resembling in vivo conditions and holds significantpotential for applications in drug development.

  • 2.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran.;Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Dept Anat Sci, Esfahan, Iran..
    Emadi, Rahmatollah
    Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran..
    Valiani, Ali
    Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Dept Anat Sci, Esfahan, Iran..
    Kharaziha, Mahshid
    Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran..
    Finne Wistrand, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    An aligned fibrous and thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-puramatrix interpenetrating polymer network hydrogel with mechanical properties adjusted for neural tissue2022In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 2883-2896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries such as stroke or trauma can lead to long-lasting disability, and there is no currently accepted treatment to regenerate functional CNS tissue after injury. Hydrogels can mimic the neural extracellular matrix by providing a suitable 3D structure and mechanical properties and have shown great promise in CNS tissue regeneration. Here we present successful synthesis of a thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-RADA 16 (Puramatrix (TM)) peptide interpenetrating network (IPN) that can be applied in situ by injection. Thermosensitive hyaluronic acid (HA) was first synthesized by combining HA with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Then, the Puramatrix (TM) self-assembled peptide was combined with the thermosensitive HA to produce a series of injectable thermoresponsive IPNs. The HA-Puramatrix (TM) IPNs formed hydrogels successfully at physiological temperature. Characterization by SEM, rheological measurements, enzymatic degradation and swelling tests was performed to select the IPN optimized for neurologic use. SEM images of the optimized dry IPNs demonstrated an aligned porous structure, and the rheological measurements showed that the hydrogels were elastic, with an elastic modulus of approximately 500 Pa, similar to that of brain tissue. An evaluation of the cell-material interactions also showed that the IPN had biological characteristics required for tissue engineering, strongly suggesting that the IPN hydrogel possessed properties beneficial for regeneration of brain tissue.

  • 3.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Khati, Vamakshi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Layer-by-Layer cellulose nanofibril coating for spheroid formation combined with decellularized extracellular matrix for 3D tumor modelingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Khati, Vamakshi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Influence of Decellularized Extra Cellular Matrix on 3D spheroids formed on Layer-by-Layer cellulose nanofibril/Polyelectrolytes coating as an in-vitro model for Hepatocellular CarcinomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lahchaichi, Ekeram
    Fayazbakhsh, Farzaneh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Tudoran, Oana
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Evaluating the Impact of Positively Charged Polyelectrolyte Molecular Weightand Bilayer Number on Tumor Spheroid Formation in the Interaction with Negatively Charged Cellulose Nanofibrils in layer by layer assembly2023Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lahchaichi, Ekeram
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Tudoran, Oana
    Department of Genetics, Genomics and Experimental Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof. Dr. I. Chiricuta”, 400015 Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
    Fayazbakhsh, Farzaneh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heuchel, Rainer
    Pancreas Cancer Research Lab, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Löhr, Matthias
    Pancreas Cancer Research Lab, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Assessing the Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Cellulose Nanofibrils and Polyelectrolytes in Pancreatic Tumor Spheroid Formation2023In: Biomedicines, E-ISSN 2227-9059, Vol. 11, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids are regarded as promising models for utilization as preclinical assessments of chemo-sensitivity. However, the creation of these tumor spheroids presents challenges, given that not all tumor cell lines are able to form consistent and regular spheroids. In this context, we have developed a novel layer-by-layer coating of cellulose nanofibril–polyelectrolyte bilayers for the generation of spheroids. This technique builds bilayers of cellulose nanofibrils and polyelectrolytes and is used here to coat two distinct 96-well plate types: nontreated/non-sterilized and Nunclon Delta. In this work, we optimized the protocol aimed at generating and characterizing spheroids on difficult-to-grow pancreatic tumor cell lines. Here, diverse parameters were explored, encompassing the bilayer count (five and ten) and multiple cell-seeding concentrations (10, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 cells per well), using four pancreatic tumor cell lines—KPCT, PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2, and CFPAC-I. The evaluation includes the quantification (number of spheroids, size, and morphology) and proliferation of the produced spheroids, as well as an assessment of their viability. Notably, our findings reveal a significant influence from both the number of bilayers and the plate type used on the successful formation of spheroids. The novel and simple layer-by-layer-based coating method has the potential to offer the large-scale production of spheroids across a spectrum of tumor cell lines.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Qin, Taoyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Layer-by-Layer Cellulose Nanofibrils: A New Coating Strategy for Development and Characterization of Tumor Spheroids as a Model for In Vitro Anticancer Drug Screening2022In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, Vol. 22, no 10, article id 2200137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-dimensional multicellular spheroids (MCSs) are complex structure of cellular aggregates and cell-to-matrix interaction that emulates the in-vivo microenvironment. This research field has grown to develop and improve spheroid generation techniques. Here, we present a new platform for spheroid generation using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technology. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) containing cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) assemble on a standard 96 well plate. Various bi-layer numbers, multiple cell seeding concentration, and two tumor cell lines (HEK 293 T, HCT 116) are utilized to generate and characterize spheroids. The number and proliferation of generated spheroids, the viability, and the response to the anti-cancer drug are examined. The spheroids are formed and proliferated on the LbL-CNF coated wells with no significant difference in connection to the number of LbL-CNF bi-layers; however, the number of formed spheroids correlates positively with the cell seeding concentration (122 ± 17) and (42 ± 8) for HCT 116 and HEK 293T respectively at 700 cells ml−1. The spheroids proliferate progressively up to (309, 663) µm of HCT 116 and HEK 293T respectively on 5 bi-layers coated wells with maintaining viability. The (HCT 116) spheroids react to the anti-cancer drug. We demonstrate a new (LbL-CNF) coating strategy for spheroids generation, with high performance and efficiency to test anti-cancer drugs.

  • 8.
    Kumar, Tharagan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Soares, Ruben R. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ali Dholey, Leyla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, AIMES Ctr Adv Integrated Med & Engn Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Multi-layer assembly of cellulose nanofibrils in a microfluidic device for the selective capture and release of viable tumor cells from whole blood2020In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 12, no 42, p. 21788-21797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to reports by the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer-related deaths reached almost 10 million in 2018. Nearly 65% of these deaths occurred in low- to middle-income countries, a trend that is bound to increase since cancer diagnostics are not currently considered a priority in resource-limited settings (RLS). Thus, cost-effective and specific cancer screening and diagnostics tools are in high demand, particularly in RLS. The selective isolation and up-concentration of rare cells while maintaining cell viability and preventing phenotypic changes is a powerful tool to allow accurate and sensitive downstream analysis. Here, multi-layer cellulose nanofibril-based coatings functionalized with anti-EpCAM antibodies on the surface of disposable microfluidic devices were optimized for specific capture of target cells, followed by efficient release without significant adverse effects. HCT 116 colon cancer cells were captured in a single step with >97% efficiency at 41.25 mu L min(-1) and, when spiked in whole blood, an average enrichment factor of similar to 200-fold relative to white blood cells was achieved. The release of cells was performed by enzymatic digestion of the cellulose nanofibrils which had a negligible impact on cell viability. In particular, >80% of the cells were recovered with at least 97% viability in less than 30 min. Such performance paves the way to expand and improve clinical diagnostic applications by simplifying the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and other rare cells directly from whole blood.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf