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  • 1.
    Amorim, Lúcia F.A.
    et al.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Gomes, Ana P.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Fangueiro, Raul
    Centre for Textile Science and Technology (2C2T), University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal.
    Gouveia, Isabel C.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Sustainable bacterial cellulose production by low cost feedstock: evaluation of apple and tea by-products as alternative sources of nutrients2023In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 5589-5606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high applicability of Bacterial Cellulose (BC) is often challenging due to its high production costs, which ultimately prevents its widespread use. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate BC production using alternative feedstock to replace high-cost synthetic carbon and nitrogen sources and to evaluate the physical and structural properties of the produced BC membranes. BC was produced through a microbial consortium from kombucha, and the formulated alternative media sustained promising BC production, especially the association of apple wastes (at 10% (W/V)) with tea mixture, with a yield similar to BC produced on Hestrin–Schramm (HS) control media. Moreover, the BC samples produced in this alternative media also exhibited comparable properties to BC from HS media, with similar water-holding capacity and retention ability, thermal stability, mechanical behavior, and a crystallinity index of 87.61% and 88.08%, respectively. Thus, our findings substantiated that expensive substrates, such as glucose, peptone, and yeast extract, could be successfully replaced by apple wastes, black and green tea, for BC production while maintaining its remarkable physical and structural properties. Furthermore, besides the low-cost advantage, the bioconversion of apple waste also reduces the environmental burden caused by its disposal in landfills.

  • 2.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Subramaniyam, Chandrasekar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kang, Mina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zhao, Luyao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wei, Xin-Feng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Svagan, Anna Justina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hierarchical soot nanoparticle self-assemblies for enhanced performance as sodium-ion battery anodes2022In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 10, no 16, p. 9059-9066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The drawbacks of amorphous hard carbon are its low conductivity and structural instability, due to its large volume change and the occurrence of side reactions with the electrolyte during cycling. Here, we propose a simple and rapid method to address these disadvantages; we used an emulsion solvent-evaporation method to create hierarchically structured microparticles of hard carbon nanoparticles, derived from soot, and multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes at a very low threshold of 2.8 wt%. These shrub-ball like microparticles have well-defined void spaces between different nanostructures of carbon, leading to an increased surface area, lower charge-resistance and side reactions, and higher electronic conductivity for Na+ insertion and de-insertion. They can be slurry cast to assemble Na+ anodes, exhibiting an initial discharge capacity of 713.3 mA h g(-1) and showing long-term stability with 120.8 mA h g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles, thus outperforming neat hard carbon nanoparticles by an order of magnitude. Our work shows that hierarchical self-assembly is attractive for increasing the performance of microparticles used for battery production.

  • 3. Forsberg, D. C. R.
    et al.
    Westin, P. -O
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Svedberg, A.
    Grundberg, H.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A method for chemical and physical modification of oriented pulp fibre sheets2022In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 29, no 15, p. 8371-8386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood pulp fibres are promising reinforcements for biocomposites due to their renewable resource origin and mechanical properties. An oriented and dense fibre reinforcement structure is beneficial for biocomposite properties. We present a method of modifying fibres (e.g. to increase strain to failure) in pre-formed oriented high-density paper structures intended for biocomposites or as hot-pressed fibre materials. Mildly delignified, well-preserved holocellulose fibres from softwood are used. Cold alkali treatment (hemicellulose removal) and mercerisation (conversion to cellulose II) were carried out successfully on oriented fibre sheets. Controlled anisotropy and sheet density are achieved from untreated and straight fibres in the sheet formation step. High mechanical properties and increased ductility of mercerised sheets were observed, which may be valuable for hot-pressed fibre materials (E ≈ 7.1 GPa, strength of 108 MPa and strain to failure of 5.3%) and biocomposites. In contrast, modified wood pulp fibres were difficult to orient, resulting in higher sheet porosity and weak interfibre bonding.

  • 4.
    Han, Xiao
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, People’s Republic of China.
    Chen, Pan
    School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081, People’s Republic of China.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    University Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CERMAV, 38000, Grenoble, France.
    Yang, Xuan
    State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, People’s Republic of China; Institute of Zhejiang University, Quzhou, 324000, People’s Republic of China.
    Planar and uniplanar orientation in nanocellulose films: interpretation of 2D diffraction patterns step-by-step2023In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 13, p. 8151-8159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is widely used in cellulose structural characterization. The commonly used “powder” XRD assumes the sample is macroscopically isotropic. For cellulose fibrous samples, however, due to the high aspect ratio of the components, the structure is often anisotropic, and the texture affects the materials properties to a large extent. A simple setup of a point-focused X-ray beam and a two-dimensional detection of scattered X-ray is a practical tool to analyze the texture. We studied three types of cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films obtained by casting. 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiper- idine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) oxidized one shows a high degree of (1–10) uniplanar orientation, whereas holocellulose CNF and enzyme-pretreated CNF showed planar orientation. In the planar orientation, the c-axis is preferentially oriented in the plane parallel to the film while within each fibril other crystallographic axis would be randomly distributed around the c-axis. Also, a clear peak can be detected at low angle corresponding to a d-spacing of 3–4 nm indicating a strong correlation perpendicular to the film at this length scale. This distance was the lowest for TEMPO-CNF and corroborates with the model of uniplanar orientation of rectangular cross-section. The numerically simulated azimuthal intensity distribution of hk0 reflections in the two types of texture agreed well with the experimental intensity distribution.

  • 5.
    Jungstedt, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mechanical behavior of all-lignocellulose composites — comparing micro- and nanoscale fibers using strain field data and FEM updatingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jungstedt, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östlund, Sören
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Solid Mechanics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mechanical behavior of all-lignocellulose composites—Comparing micro- and nanoscale fibers using strain field data and FEM updating2022In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 161, p. 107095-107095, article id 107095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot-pressed, binder-free wood fiber (WF) composites can serve as load-bearing and eco-friendly materials, and the comparison of nanoscale fibril reinforcement with microscale wood fibers is of interest. We investigated property differences and interpreted deformation mechanisms with strain field measurements using digital image correlation combined with orthotropic, elastic–plastic finite element model updating predictions. Random-in-plane microfibrillated lignocellulose (MFLC) composites showed better mechanical properties than WF composites due to stronger strain-hardening from lower porosity and better interfibrillar adhesion, provided by the intrinsic lignin-hemicellulose binder. Axially oriented wood fiber composites (O-WF) achieved comparable mechanical properties to random MFLC, with lower values for eco-indicators. The FEM updating method could successfully determine all 4 independent elastic constants from one 45° off-axis experiment, although the plasticity model required two more experiments.

  • 7.
    Koskela, Salla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Shennan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zha, Li
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    An Oxidative Enzyme Boosting Mechanical and Optical Performance of Densified Wood Films2023In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 19, no 17, article id 2205056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature has evolved elegant ways to alter the wood cell wall structure through carbohydrate-active enzymes, offering environmentally friendly solutions to tailor the microstructure of wood for high-performance materials. In this work, the cell wall structure of delignified wood is modified under mild reaction conditions using an oxidative enzyme, lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO). LPMO oxidation results in nanofibrillation of cellulose microfibril bundles inside the wood cell wall, allowing densification of delignified wood under ambient conditions and low pressure into transparent anisotropic films. The enzymatic nanofibrillation facilitates microfibril fusion and enhances the adhesion between the adjacent wood fiber cells during densification process, thereby significantly improving the mechanical performance of the films in both longitudinal and transverse directions. These results improve the understanding of LPMO-induced microstructural changes in wood and offer an environmentally friendly alternative for harsh chemical treatments and energy-intensive densification processes thus representing a significant advance in sustainable production of high-performance wood-derived materials.

  • 8.
    Koskela, Salla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wang, Shennan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zha, Li
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase modulates cellulose microfibrils in woodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Li, Junyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Formation and stability of studtite in bicarbonate-containing waters2023In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 263, article id 115297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studtite and meta-studtite are the only two uranyl peroxides found in nature. Sparsely soluble studtite has been found in natural uranium deposits, on the surface of spent nuclear fuel in contact with water and on core material from major nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl. The formation of studtite on the surface of nuclear fuel can have an impact on the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. In this work, we have experimentally studied the formation of studtite as function of HCO3- concentration and pH. The results show that studtite can form at pH = 10 in solutions without added HCO3-. At pH <= 7, the precipitate was found to be mainly studtite, while at 8 = pH = 9.8, a mixture of studtite and meta-schoepite was found. Studtite formation from UO22+ and H2O2 was observed at [HCO3-] <= 2 mM and studtite was only found to dissolve at [HCO3-] > 2 mM.

  • 10.
    Li, Lengwan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Beijing Engineering Research Centre of Cellulose and Its Derivatives, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yang, Lin
    NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, United States.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CERMAV, 38000 Grenoble, France.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Residual Strain and Nanostructural Effects during Drying of Nanocellulose/Clay Nanosheet Hybrids: Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Results2023In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 17, no 16, p. 15810-15820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with 2D silicate nanoplatelet reinforcement readily form multifunctional composites by vacuum-assisted self-assembly from hydrocolloidal mixtures. The final nanostructure is formed during drying. The crystalline nature of CNF and montmorillonite (MTM) made it possible to use synchrotron X-ray scattering (WAXS, SAXS) to monitor structural development during drying from water and from ethanol. Nanostructural changes in the CNF and MTM crystals were investigated. Changes in the out-of-plane orientation of CNF and MTM were determined. Residual drying strains previously predicted from theory were confirmed in both cellulose and MTM platelets due to capillary forces. The formation of tactoid platelet stacks could be followed. We propose that after filtration, the constituent nanoparticles in the swollen, solid gel already have a “fixed” location, although self-assembly and ordering processes take place during drying.

  • 11.
    Li, Lengwan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Maddalena, Lorenza
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Tecnol, Alessandria Campus,Viale Teresa Michel 5, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy..
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CERMAV, CNRS, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Carosio, Federico
    Politecn Torino, Dipartimento Sci Applicata & Tecnol, Alessandria Campus,Viale Teresa Michel 5, I-15121 Alessandria, Italy..
    Ogawa, Yu
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CERMAV, CNRS, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable nanocomposites of well-dispersed 2D layered silicates in cellulose nanofibril (CNF) matrix2022In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 279, p. 119004-, article id 119004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposites based on components from nature, which can be recycled are of great interest in new materials for sustainable development. The range of properties of nacre-inspired hybrids of 1D cellulose and 2D clay platelets are investigated in nanocomposites with improved nanoparticle dispersion in the starting hydrocolloid mixture. Films with a wide range of compositions are prepared by capillary force assisted physical assembly (vacuum-assisted filtration) of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) reinforced by exfoliated nanoclays of three different aspect ratios: saponite, montmorillonite and mica. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron micrographs show almost monolayer dispersion of saponite and montmorillonite and high orientation parallel to the film surface. Films exhibit ultimate strength up to 573 MPa. Young's modulus exceeds 38 GPa even at high MTM contents (40-80 vol%). Optical transmittance, UV-shielding, thermal shielding and fire-retardant properties are measured, found to be very good and are sensitive to the 2D nanoplatelet dispersion.

  • 12.
    Mastantuoni, Gabriella G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Chen, Hui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    High-Strength and UV-Shielding Transparent Thin Films from Hot-Pressed Sulfonated Wood2023In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood is a high-strength lightweight material owing to its orthotropic cellular structure and composite-like constitution. In conventional fabrication of wood-derived functional materials, the removal of the potentially beneficial components, such as lignin and hemicellulose, often leads to the disruption of the native hierarchical wood structure. Herein, we developed a facile method of in situ wood sulfonation followed by hot pressing for pine veneers to prepare high-density transparent thin films with preserved wood components and the natural fiber alignment. An optimum lignin content of the hot-pressed films was found to be 20.6% where both mechanical and optical properties were significantly enhanced with a more dense and compact structure. The hot-pressed transparent wood films also showed UV-blocking capability and could be recycled into discrete wood fibers owing to the sulfonate groups endowed by the in situ sulfonation step. The unique combination of properties achieved for thin wood films marks an important step in engineering functional wood-based materials that utilize both the structure of aligned fibers and the complex components of natural wood.

  • 13.
    Mianehrow, Hanieh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Moisture effects on mechanical behavior of CNF-RGO nanocomposites showing electrical conductivity2022In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 163, article id 107235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-processed nanocomposites based on cellulose nanofibrils (CNF and 2D platelets are sustainable alternatives to nanocomposites from fossil-based polymers. The degree of dispersion of 2D platelets in CNF matrix is critical to mechanical properties, but reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has poor hydrocolloidal stability. This is addressed by forming electrically conductive and strong CNF-RGO nanocomposites by green chemical reduction of wet, vacuum-filtered CNF-GO cakes, taking advantage of the colloidal dispersibility of GO platelets in CNF, as characterized in the solid nanocomposite by SAXS, WAXS and FE-SEM. CNF-RGO nanocomposite with 2 wt% RGO shows a Youngs modulus of 20.4 GPa and tensile strength of 319 MPa, with considerable ductility at 50 % RH. Although CNF-GO shows much higher moisture sorption than CNF-RGO at 90 %RH, the CNF-GO mechanical properties are higher, for thermodynamic reasons, MD simulations predict dry, hydrogen-bonded CNF-GO interfaces even in wet conditions, and this can explain the better performance of CNF-GO.

  • 14.
    Qin, Liguo
    et al.
    Xi An Jiao Tong Univ, Inst Design Sci & Basic Components, Sch Mech Engn, Key Lab,Educ Minist Modern Design & Rotor Bearing, Xian 710049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fan, Yanmiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose nanofibril reinforced functional chitosan biocomposite films2023In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 120, p. 107964-, article id 107964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, chitosan has become attractive due to being biodegradable, biocompatible and renewable. However, the weak mechanical properties of chitosan films limit their large-scale application. In this work, a strategy of blending TEMPO, oxidized CNF (TOCN) and chitosan was developed to fabricate nanocomposite films in order to improve the mechanical properties and maintain biocompatibility. The TOCN/chitosan nanocomposite films exhibited excellent optical transmittance (>85%) and extremely high tensile strength of 235 MPa. The good compatibility of TOCN and chitosan chains, good dispersion of chitosan aggregates and the presence of stiff TOCN crystal domains are the main reasons for getting improved mechanical strength of composite films. The films showed good biocompatible properties based on the cell activity assay results. Furthermore, they were stable in PBS buffer for more than 6 months without significant degradation. The TOCN/chitosan nanocomposite films with these excellent properties could be employed in medical applications.

  • 15.
    Su, Yingchun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Xue, Han
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Fu, Yujie
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Chen, Shiqian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Li, Zheng
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Knoks, Ainars
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Bogdanova, Olga
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Lesničenoks, Pēteris
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Palmbahs, Roberts
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Laurila, Mika‐Matti
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences Tampere University Tampere 33720 Finland.
    Mäntysalo, Matti
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences Tampere University Tampere 33720 Finland.
    Hammar, Mattias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Hallén, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Nordell, Nils
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Electrum Laboratory, ELAB.
    Li, Jiantong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Monolithic Fabrication of Metal‐Free On‐Paper Self‐Charging Power Systems2024In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-charging power systems (SCPSs) are envisioned as promising solutions for emerging electronics to mitigate the increasing global concern about battery waste. However, present SCPSs suffer from large form factors, unscalable fabrication, and material complexity. Herein, a type of highly stable, eco-friendly conductive inks based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are developed for direct ink writing of multiple components in the SCPSs, including electrodes for miniaturized spacer-free triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and microsupercapacitors (MSCs), and interconnects. The principle of “one ink, multiple functions” enables to almost fully print the entire SCPSs on the same paper substrate in a monolithic manner without post-integration. The monolithic fabrication significantly improves the upscaling capability for manufacturing and reduces the form factor of the entire SCPSs (a small footprint area of ≈2 cm × 3 cm and thickness of ≈1 mm). After pressing/releasing the TENGs for ≈79000 cycles, the 3-cell series-connected MSC array can be charged to 1.6 V while the 6-cell array to 3.0 V. On-paper SCPSs are promising to serve as lightweight, thin, sustainable, and low-cost power supplies. 

  • 16.
    Tavares da Costa, Marcus Vinicius
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Fracture properties of thin brittle MTM clay coating on ductile HEC polymer substrate2023In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 230, article id 111947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin clay coatings can be deposited from water dispersions for the purpose of improved gas barrier properties and fire retardancy of polymeric materials. Mechanical properties of the coatings are difficult to assess, since they are very thin (≈1µm). In-situ tests using a micro tensile stage in a scanning electron microscope reveal a thickness-dependent microcracking mechanism, and Weibull parameters for coating fracture are extracted. Complex fracture events are identified, related to a weak clay coating-polymer substrate interface. A micromechanical finite element formulation provides values of 5 MPa for interfacial shear strength and 1 J/m2 for interfacial fracture toughness. From the multiple cracking behavior of the clay coating, a clay strength ≈ 225 MPa is estimated by the Weibull strength parameter from fragmentation diagrams. The method may be extended to other combinations of brittle coating-ductile substrates.

  • 17.
    Tran, Van Chinh
    et al.
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden;; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping SE-601 74, Sweden;.
    Mastantuoni, Gabriella G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Zabihipour, Marzieh
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden;.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden;; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping SE-601 74, Sweden;.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Engquist, Isak
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping 60174, Sweden;; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping SE-601 74, Sweden;.
    Electrical current modulation in wood electrochemical transistor2023In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 120, no 118, article id e2218380120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of mass transport in plants has recently inspired the development of low-cost and sustainable wood-based electronics. Herein, we report a wood electrochemical transistor (WECT) where all three electrodes are fully made of conductive wood (CW). The CW is prepared using a two-step strategy of wood delignification followed by wood amalgamation with a mixed electron-ion conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)–polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). The modified wood has an electrical conductivity of up to 69 Sm−1 induced by the formation of PEDOT:PSS microstructures inside the wood 3D scaffold. CW is then used to fabricate the WECT, which is capable of modulating an electrical current in a porous and thick transistor channel (1 mm) with an on/off ratio of 50. The device shows a good response to gate voltage modulation and exhibits dynamic switching properties similar to those of an organic electrochemical transistor. This wood-based device and the proposed working principle demonstrate the possibility to incorporate active electronic functionality into the wood, suggesting different types of bio-based electronic devices.

  • 18.
    Wang, Shennan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zha, Li
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Koskela, Salla
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wood xerogel for fabrication of high-performance transparent wood2023In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 2827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optically transparent wood has been fabricated by structure-retaining delignification of wood and subsequent infiltration of thermo- or photocurable polymer resins but still limited by the intrinsic low mesopore volume of the delignified wood. Here we report a facile approach to fabricate strong transparent wood composites using the wood xerogel which allows solvent-free infiltration of resin monomers into the wood cell wall under ambient conditions. The wood xerogel with high specific surface area (260 m2 g–1) and high mesopore volume (0.37 cm3 g–1) is prepared by evaporative drying of delignified wood comprising fibrillated cell walls at ambient pressure. The mesoporous wood xerogel is compressible in the transverse direction and provides precise control of the microstructure, wood volume fraction, and mechanical properties for the transparent wood composites without compromising the optical transmittance. Transparent wood composites of large size and high wood volume fraction (50%) are successfully prepared, demonstrating potential scalability of the method.

  • 19.
    Wei, Xin-Feng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakonen, Aron
    Sensor Vis AB, SE-45522 Hisings Backa, Sweden..
    Liu, Baicang
    Sichuan Univ, Inst New Energy & Low Carbon Technol, Inst Disaster Management & Reconstruct, Key Lab Deep Earth Sci & Engn,Minist Educ,Coll Ar, Chengdu 610207, Sichuan, Peoples R China..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Millions of microplastics released from a biodegradable polymer during biodegradation/enzymatic hydrolysis2022In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 211, article id 118068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we show that enzymatic hydrolysis of a biodegradable polyester (poly(e-caprolactone)) by Amano Lipase PS in an aqueous (buffer) environment yielded rapidly an excessive number of microplastic particles; merely 0.1 g of poly(e-caprolactone) film was demonstrated to yield millions of particles. There were also indications of non-enzymatic hydrolysis at the same conditions, but this did not yield any particles within the time frame of the experiment (up to 6 days). Microplastic particles formed had irregular shapes with an average size of around 10 pm, with only a few reaching 60 pm. The formation of microplastic particles resulted from the uneven hydrolysis/erosion rate across the polymer film surface, which led to a rough and undulating surface with ridge, branch, and rod-shaped micro-protruding structures. The consequent detachment and fragmentation of these micro-sized protruding structures resulted in the release of microplastics to the surroundings. Together with microplastics, hydrolysis products such as acidic monomers and oligomers were also released during the enzymatic hydrolysis process, causing a pH decrease in the surrounding liquid. The results suggest that the risk of microplastic pollution from biodegradable plastics is notable despite their biodegradation. Special attention needs to be paid when using and disposing of biodegradable plastics, considering the enormous impact of the paradigm shift towards more biodegradable products on the environment.

  • 20.
    Wu, Qiong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;Mohammed VI Polytech Univ UM6P, Benguerir 43150, Morocco..
    Mushi, Ngesa E.
    Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Dar Es Salaam, Coll Engn & Technol, Dept Mech & Ind Engn, Dar Es Salaam 60372, Tanzania..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    High-Strength Nanostructured Film Based on beta-Chitin Nanofibrils from Squid Illex argentinus Pens by 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl Oxyl-Mediated Reaction2021In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 5356-5363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized beta-chitin nanofibrils (T-ChNF) are novel nanofibrils of high strength and stiffness and can also enhance the adsorption of chitosan in materials for biomedical applications. This study presents the preparation, structure, and properties of T-ChNF based on squid pens. Our nanofibrils have a zeta potential of -25.3 mV at neutral pH and a carboxylic content of 0.17 mmol/g, making hydrocolloid suspension stable at alkaline and neutral pH. It was demonstrated that positively charged chitosan could be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of T-ChNF, leading to charge neutralization. The key to strong squid pen T-ChNF is the initial raw squid chitin properties and the high degree of acetylation (DA = 99.9%). The T-ChNF diameter is similar to 4.4 nm, and the length is in the micrometer range. The length and diameter are similar to those of squid pen beta-chitin fibrils prepared under mild conditions. These qualities of fibrils resulted in high-strength (176 MPa) chitin films prepared using the rapid vacuum filtration and drying technique. T-ChNF-based films are ductile, flexible, and transparent.

  • 21.
    Yang, Hanmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Zaini, Ilman Nuran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Pan, Ruming
    School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001, Harbin, China.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Yazhe
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bolívar Caballero, José Juan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Subasi, Yaprak
    Department of Chemistry - Ångström Laboratory, Structural Chemistry, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 751 21, Uppsala, Sweden, Lägerhyddsvägen 1.
    Nurdiawati, Anissa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Wang, Shule
    International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, 210037, Nanjing, China, Longpan Road 159; Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, 210042, Nanjing, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village.
    Shen, Yazhou
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, London, UK.
    Wang, Tianxiang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Wang, Yue
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Sandström, Linda
    Department of Biorefinery and Energy, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, Box 726, SE-941 28, Piteå, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Distributed electrified heating for efficient hydrogen production2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 3868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces a distributed electrified heating approach that is able to innovate chemical engineering involving endothermic reactions. It enables rapid and uniform heating of gaseous reactants, facilitating efficient conversion and high product selectivity at specific equilibrium. Demonstrated in catalyst-free CH4 pyrolysis, this approach achieves stable production of H2 (530 g h−1 L reactor−1) and carbon nanotube/fibers through 100% conversion of high-throughput CH4 at 1150 °C, surpassing the results obtained from many complex metal catalysts and high-temperature technologies. Additionally, in catalytic CH4 dry reforming, the distributed electrified heating using metallic monolith with unmodified Ni/MgO catalyst washcoat showcased excellent CH4 and CO2 conversion rates, and syngas production capacity. This innovative heating approach eliminates the need for elongated reactor tubes and external furnaces, promising an energy-concentrated and ultra-compact reactor design significantly smaller than traditional industrial systems, marking a significant advance towards more sustainable and efficient chemical engineering society.

  • 22.
    Yang, Xuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Zhejiang Univ, Coll Chem & Biol Engn, Key Lab Biomass Chem Engn, State Key Lab Chem Engn,Minist Educ, Hangzhou 310027, Peoples R China..
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Reid, Michael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Drottning Kristinas vag 55, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Processing strategy for reduced energy demand of nanostructured CNF/clay composites with tailored interfaces2023In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 312, article id 120788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre-mimicking nanocomposites based on colloidal cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and clay nanoparticles show excellent mechanical properties, yet processing typically involves preparation of two colloids followed by a mixing step, which is time- and energy-consuming. In this study, a facile preparation method using low energy kitchen blenders is reported in which CNF disintegration, clay exfoliation and mixing carried out in one step. Compared to composites made from the conventional method, the energy demand is reduced by about 97 %; the composites also show higher strength and work to fracture. Colloidal stability, CNF/clay nanostructure, and CNF/clay orientation are well characterized. The results suggest favorable effects from hemicellulose-rich, negatively charged pulp fibers and corresponding CNFs. CNF disintegration and colloidal stability are facilitated with substantial CNF/clay interfacial interaction. The results show a more sustainable and industrially relevant processing concept for strong CNF/clay nanocomposites.

  • 23.
    Zhang, Cunzhi
    et al.
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Chen, Guixian
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Xijun
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Zhou, Shenghui
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Yu, Jie
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Feng, Xiao
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Qi, Haisong
    South China Univ Technol, State Key Lab Pulp & Paper Engn, Guangzhou 510640, Peoples R China..
    Eco-Friendly Bioinspired Interface Design for High-Performance Cellulose Nanofibril/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 49, p. 55527-55535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by a wood-like multicomponent structure, an interface-reinforced method was developed to fabricate high-performance cellulose nanofibril (CNF)/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites. Holocellulose nanofibrils (HCNFs) with core-shell structure were first obtained from bagasse via mild delignification and mechanical defibration process. The well-preserved native hemicellulose as the amphiphilic shell of HCNFs could act as a binding agent, sizing agent, and even dispersing agent between HCNFs and CNTs. Remarkably, both the tensile strength at high relative humidity (83% RH) and electrical conductivity of the HCNF/CNT nanocomposites were significantly improved up to 121 MPa and 321 S/m, respectively, demonstrating great superiority compared to normal CNF/CNT composite films. Furthermore, these HCNF/CNT composites with outstanding integrated performances exhibited great potential in the field of flexible liquid sensing.

1 - 23 of 23
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