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  • 1. Alanne, K.
    et al.
    Schade, J.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Services Engineering.
    Saari, A.
    Jokisalo, J.
    Kalamees, T.
    Economic viability of energy-efficiency measures in educational buildings in Finland2013In: Advances in Building Energy Research, ISSN 1751-2549, E-ISSN 1756-2201, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 120-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The economic viability of novel energy-efficient design concepts has been evaluated in Finnish educational buildings. The total energy consumption of representative target buildings with each design concept has been found using the whole-building simulation tool IDA Indoor Climate and Energy 4.0, and the financial viability has been assessed using the discounted payback period method. Different thermal insulation and air tightness properties of the building envelope, and different ventilation's heat recovery efficiency assumptions and heat distribution options have been investigated. The results suggest that a prudent attitude should be taken toward the investments in ultra-low-energy designs. Total energy-saving potential of 25-32% can be obtained. The payback periods varied from 15 to more than 40 years. The results can be generalized in cold climates and techno-economic conditions similar to Finland.

  • 2.
    Alessandro, Magny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Pdungsilp, Aumnad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Optimization of Energy Supply Systems for a Sustainable District in Stockholm Using Genetic Algorithms2014In: Proceedings of the World Sustainable Buildings Conference 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Bohdanowicz, P.
    et al.
    Simanic, B.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Environmental Action in Scandic Hotels: Sustainable Building2005Other (Refereed)
  • 4. Bohdanowicz, P.
    et al.
    Simanic, B.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Sustainable hotels – Eco-certification according to EU Flower, Nordic Swan and the Polish Hotel association2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over their lifetime (including construction, operation, maintenance, and eventually demolition), buildings require appreciable amounts of energy, water and many other resources. The built environment is undoubtedly the origin of a considerable portion of the overall air, water and soil pollution, as well as waste generation in our society. Hotel buildings, due to their very specific and unique function and operational patterns, generally have a much larger ecological impact than other commercial buildings of similar size. At the same time, the well-being and development of the tourism and the hotel industry, relies heavily on the availability of a clean, natural environment. It is crucial for the sustainability of ecological systems, as well as business operations to ensure that hotel facilities are designed, constructed, operated and refurbished in a manner that is least harmful to the environment. If the environment is part of your business, protecting the environment means protecting your business. 2 For many years, the hotel industry was reluctant to acknowledge any significant influence on the natural surroundings. Recently, however, attitudes have started to change. In order to help hoteliers incorporate more environmentally sound practices into daily operations, branch associations, various NGOs, academic communities and hotel companies continue to develop guidelines and manuals. Industry self-regulation, in the form of certification and labelling schemes, has proved to be a valuable additional tool. Numerous certification and labelling schemes are offered internationally, nationally or locally by industrial organisations, as well as by governmental and non-governmental instit utions (EU Flower, Nordic Swan, Green Globe 21, Green Leaf, The Green Key, and others).

  • 5. Bohdanowicz, P.
    et al.
    Simanic, B.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Sustainable hotels – Environmental Reporting According to Green Globe 21, Green Globes Canada / GEM UK, IHEI Hotel Benchmark and Hilton Environmental Reporting2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    A study of resource consumption and modelling in mid-market chain hotels in StockholmIn: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Attitudes towards sustainability in chain hotels – Results of a European survey2003In: Proceedings of the CIB International Conference on Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    Determinants and benchmarking of resource consumption in hotels: case study of Hilton International and Scandic in Europe2007In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 82-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a study of resource consumption in 184 Hilton International and Scandic hotels in Europe. An overview of the characteristics of these two brands (upscale and mid-market, respectively), as well as the collective resource consumption in these hotels is presented (2004 data). This is followed by a more detailed analysis of a number of physical and operational factors that may potentially influence the energy and water use in these hotels. A multiple variable regression analysis indicated that, in the absence of climate data, hotel standard, total hotel floor area, number of guest-nights sold and number of food covers sold all affect the energy and water use in these facilities. The survey results further document significant differences in the energy- and water-utilisation in Hilton and Scandic hotels. This indicates that establishing realistic resource consumption benchmarks or models requires classifying hotels (especially those belonging to the upscale brand) into sufficiently specialised sub-groups representing facilities with comparable properties. It is further suggested that benchmarking of facility components may be necessary. The paper concludes with some recommendations on the procedure and criteria for establishing a useful reporting system and benchmarking model.

  • 9.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Simanic, Branko
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Environmental education at Scandic hotels: approach and results2004In: Proceedings of the Regional Central and Eastern European Conference on Sustainable Building (SB04), 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Simanic, Branko
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Environmental training and measures at Scandic hotels, Sweden2005In: Tourism Review International, ISSN 1544-2721, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 7-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Simanic, Branko
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Sustainable hotels: environmental reporting according to Green Globe 21, Green Globes Canada / GEM UK, IHEI benchmarkhotel and Hilton Environmental Reporting2005In: Proceedings of Sustainable Building (SB05) Conference, 2005, p. 1642-1649Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bohdanowicz, Paulina
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Zanki-Alujevic, Vlasta
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Attitudes towards environmental responsibility among Swedish, Polish and Croatian hoteliers2004In: Proceedings of the BEST Sustainable Tourism Think Tank IV: Sustainability and mass destinations: Challanges and possibilities, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13. Edwards, Deborah
    et al.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Sustainable Building Systems.
    Miller, Graham
    Research agenda for innovation in sustainable tourism2008In: Tourism and Hospitality Research, ISSN 1464-2700, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 56-61Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hassanie, Samer H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Azar, Marc
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Occupant Presence Modeling Using Random Forests2016In: YRSB16 – iiSBE Forum of Young Researchers in Sustainable Building 2016 / [ed] Julie Železná, Petr Hájek, Jan Tywoniak, Antonín Lupíšek, Kateřina Sojková, Czech Technical University in Prague , 2016, p. 188-195Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hassanie, Samer H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    A Holistic Approach to Building Performance: A Case Study of an Office Building in Sweden2016In: CLIMA 2016 - proceedings of the 12th REHVA World Congress / [ed] Heiselberg, Per Kvols, Aalborg University, Department of Civil Engineering , 2016, Vol. 6, article id 246Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increase of building certification systems worldwide, the evaluation of building performance has been standardized. These certifications provide some points for indoor air quality and thermal comfort in reference to standards like ASHRAE 55 and ISO 7730. However, the assessment is performed taking into account whether the design fulfils the requirements of the standards, in addition to measurements and a survey of the occupants’ thermal comfort (Miljobyggnad Gold). In fact, this only ensures that the requirements are met at the time of the inspection and little is known about the building’s performance after the inspection.In order to analyze the thermal comfort of occupants, a lot of studies have been done applying either the rational or adaptive approach. The rational approach is based on a heat balance model of the human body, while the adaptive approach concentrates on what happens outside controlled environments taking into account the humans’ interaction with their surroundings.This paper presents a new methodology to assess building performance in a holistic manner. The key parameters that are considered include the energy use, the occupants’ thermal comfort, the environmental impact and the corresponding cost. An office building located in Stockholm, Sweden is used as a case study. The energy use is measured through installed energy meters, whereas the thermal comfort is assessed using the degree hours criteria, described in standard EN 15251 (2007).The results allow a better understanding of the correlation between the amount of used energy (kWh per square meter) and the quality of the delivered service. Moreover a long term monitoring of the building leads to a better understanding of how the building should be operated and in some instances to energy savings without compromising on the quality.

  • 16.
    Hassanie, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Long-term performance assessment of autonomous demand controlled ventilation units: A case study of an office building in SwedenIn: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Kilkis, Siir
    et al.
    Wang, Cong
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Björk, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Cleaner energy scenarios for building clusters in campus areas based on the Rational Exergy Management Model2017In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 155, p. 72-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Principles based on the quality of energy, namely exergy, can assist in attaining a more efficient and cleaner energy supply structure. This paper analyzes two building clusters in campus areas based on a stepwise approach with four steps according to the Rational Exergy Management Model. The clusters involve 8 buildings at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology and those in the Albano district that is a former industrial site and will become a joint campus area in Stockholm. The energy supply for the campus and urban vicinity includes a combined heat and power plant with district heating and cooling. In this context, the energy and exergy profiles of the building clusters are compared. The level of exergy match in the energy system is analyzed. Four scenarios are then devised, which involve energy savings and different shares of various supply options. These include a new biofuel unit, seawater heat pumps, large scale aquifer thermal energy storage, heat supply from solar collectors, and electricity and heat from photovoltaic thermal arrays. The present case and four scenarios are found to have exergy matches that range between 0.49 and 0.81. The scenarios indicate that savings of 16 GWh energy, 9.6 GWh exergy, and 2663 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions are possible. The paper contributes to exergy based analyzes for campus areas and concludes with the prospect of using campus areas as pioneering case studies for advancing the transition to cleaner energy scenarios.

  • 18. Kilkis, Siir
    et al.
    Wang, Cong
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Björk, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Cleaner energy supply structures for campus building clustersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The comparison of building clusters based on energy and the quality of energy (exergy) is a

    key aspect for determining steps towards cleaner energy supply structures. This paper

    compares two building clusters based on an integrated approach that involves building and

    energy system level analyses. The first cluster involves 8 buildings with diverse energy profiles

    at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology campus, including faculty buildings, laboratories, and

    a data center with waste heat recovery. The second cluster involves planned buildings in the

    Albano district in the vicinity of the KTH campus that will be a joint area with lecture buildings

    and accommodation for 3 universities in Stockholm. The present energy supply structure for

    the campus and the surrounding urban area includes a local combined heat and power (CHP)

    plant. The comparison of the building clusters involve analyses based on the Rational Exergy

    Management Model. Four scenarios, which involve different shares for the existing CHP units,

    new biofuel CHP unit, seawater heat pumps, peak load boilers, electric boilers, large scale

    aquifer thermal energy storage, heat supply from solar collectors, and electricity and heat from

    photovoltaic thermal arrays are devised for comparison. The scenarios have at most an exergy

    match of 0.81. The paper concludes with useful results that are in line with the aims of IEA

    Annex 64 on Optimised Performance of Energy Supply Systems with Exergy Principles.

  • 19. Kjellström, B.
    et al.
    Arvidsson, A.
    Forslund, H.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Renewable Energy Technologies for Decentralized Rural Electricity Systems: SEI Climate & Energy Program Report 2005-012005Report (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lu, Hai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Alanne, K.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Energy quality management for building clusters and districts (BCDs) through multi-objective optimization2014In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 79, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Renewable energy systems entail a significant potential to meet the energy requirements of building clusters and districts (BCDs) provided that local energy sources are exploited efficiently. Besides improving the energy efficiency by reducing energy consumption and improving the match between energy supply and demand, energy quality issues have become a key topic of interest. Energy quality management is a technique that aims at optimally utilizing the exergy content of various renewable energy sources. In addition to minimizing life-cycle CO2 emissions related to exergy losses of an energy system, issues such as system reliability should be addressed. The present work contributes to the research by proposing a novel multi-objective design optimization scheme that minimizes the global warming potential during the life-cycle and maximizes the exergy performance, while the maximum allowable level of the loss of power supply probability (LPSP) is predefined by the user as a constraint. The optimization makes use of Genetic Algorithm (GA). Finally, a case study is presented, where the above methodology has been applied to an office BCD located in Norway. The proposed optimization scheme is proven to be efficient in finding the optimal design and can be easily enlarged to encompass more relevant objective functions.

  • 21.
    Lu, Hai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    A study of the design criteria affecting energy demand in new building clusters using fuzzy AHP2013In: Sustainability in Energy and Buildings: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings (SEB´12), Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 955-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The level of concern regarding the total energy consumption in new building clusters/urban districts (BCDs) has increased recently. Rising living standards have led to a significant increase in building energy consumption over the past few decades. Therefore, along with sustainability requirements, it is essential to establish an effective and precise energy demand model for new building clusters/districts. In principle, energy demand in building clusters is hard to plan and pre-calculate because a number of design criteria influence energy performance. Establishing such a model would require a decision-making base, and the present study proposes two methods for achieving this objective. The study uses general survey aims to collect and identify the design criteria that affect the energy demand model and to evaluate the priorities of each criterion using the fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method. Four main criteria - location, building design, government and cluster design - are established, along with a total of 13 secondary criteria. The results show that the use of the AHP method can accurately guide the energy demand model and automatically rank significant criteria. The method can provide the weighting value for each criterion as well as the relative ranking for the energy demand building model. According to the sustainability concept, one crucial benefit is an improvement in the energy performance of building clusters/urban districts and a reduction in energy consumption. Another advantage of this methodology is that it can provide accurate energy input for future energy supply system optimisation.

  • 22.
    Lu, Hai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems. Electric Power Research Institute, Yunnan Electric Power and Research Institute (Group), Kunming, China .
    Yu, Z.
    Alanne, K.
    Zhang, L.
    Fan, L.
    Xu, X.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Transition path towards hybrid systems in China: Obtaining net-zero exergy district using a multi-objective optimization method2014In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 85, p. 524-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hybrid energy system including both off-site and distributed energy sources, energy conversion technologies and operation methods, is a necessary step on a transition path towards a sustainable energy system. The challenge is to identify such a combination of design options that result in minimum life cycle cost (LCC) and maximum exergy efficiency (EE) at each phase of the transition path. In this paper, a time-effective multi-objective optimization method based on genetic algorithm (GA), is proposed for the transition path problem. The proposed model makes use of a fitness function approach to reduce the model into one objective function and to reduce the computational time. In a case study, the model is applied to a potential net-zero exergy district (NZEXD) in Hangzhou, China. Here, three possible hybrid energy scenarios and three preference treatment strategies are analyzed. The study suggests that the proposed approach is workable for the identification of the most feasible options to be gradually integrated in an NZEXD in a multi-stage process. In the Hangzhou case, with the reduction of investments in distributed energy components and escalating market prices of fossil fuels, distributed energy system (DES) may have more feasibility in the near future.

  • 23.
    Lu, Hai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems. Key Laboratory of Efficient Utilization of Low and Medium Grade Energy (Tianjin University), China.
    Yu, Zitao
    Alanne, Kari
    Xu, Xu
    Fan, Liwu
    Yu, Han
    Zhang, Liang
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Parametric analysis of energy quality management for district in China using multi-objective optimization approach2014In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 87, p. 636-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the increasing energy demands and global warming, energy quality management (EQM) for districts has been getting importance over the last few decades. The evaluation of the optimum energy systems for specific districts is an essential part of EQM. This paper presents a deep analysis of the optimum energy systems for a district sited in China. A multi-objective optimization approach based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed for the analysis. The optimization process aims to search for the suitable 3E (minimum economic cost and environmental burden as well as maximum efficiency) energy systems. Here, life cycle CO2 equivalent (LCCO2), life cycle cost (LCC) and exergy efficiency (EE) are set as optimization objectives. Then, the optimum energy systems for the Chinese case are presented. The final work is to investigate the effects of different energy parameters. The results show the optimum energy systems might vary significantly depending on some parameters.

  • 24.
    Martin, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Jonsson, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Sustainable Building Systems.
    Sustainable Energy Engineering:  An International Master Degree Program2002In: Proc. Engineering in Sustainable Development Conference, October 24th/25th 2002, Delft, The Netherlands, 2002, p. Paper no. 143-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Cabin air quality onboard commercial jet aircraft1996Other (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Invited Keynote Lecture: Advancing Environmentally Sustainable Strata Title Living2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Pdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Alessandro, Magny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Energy system and service optimization for building clusters of new urban development: Applying multi-objective genetic algorithmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Ngo, Tuan
    University of Melbourne.
    A Framework for Integrated Energy Systems, Infrastructure, and Services Optimization with Visualization and Simulation Platform for Low-carbon Precincts2013In: Proceedings of the International Symposium for Next Generation Infrastructure, 1 - 3 October 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy informatics can be enhanced to support decision-making, communication and benchmarking of the energy performance both in design and operational phases. To enable engineers, developers and policy-makers to better understand the implications of energy systems and services, computer-generated visualization is a powerful tool to inform a range of technological options and to analyze the effects of energy system strategies. Visualization increases the transparency of results and the understanding of interactions between users and energy systems. This paper presents a novel conceptual framework for integrating energy systems, infrastructure and services optimization with a visualization and simulation platform. It focuses on the development of a tool for low-carbon energy systems and high quality energy services at precinct scale. The paper describes the vision and architectural design for the integrated framework. It is expected to serve as a next generation approach to managing energy services, carbon emissions and efficient resource use in the built environment. This will help to deliver new environmentally sustainable infrastructure and achieve carbon neutrality in urban development.

  • 29.
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    A Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Method for the Retrofitting of Designated Building in Thailand2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    A proposal of urban district carbon budgets for sustainable urban development projects2013In: Sustainability in Energy and Buildings: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings (SEB´12), Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 947-954Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy security and carbon emissions are key issues for policy-makers and research communities worldwide. Climate change mitigation poses many challenges for all levels of society. Energy-related carbon emissions in urban areas have received a great deal of attention. This paper builds on the principle that urban areas are major sources of emissions and play an important role in the carbon cycle. Urban development can serve as a cornerstone for achieving transition towards a sustainable city. This paper proposes and describes a framework for carbon budgets with a focus on urban district level. The urban district carbon budget is a mechanism for embedding long-term total emission restrictions into the urban economy. This paper proposes a proposal of urban district carbon budgets in an effort to provide the figure for emission allowances that can be emitted in a given amount of time. The paper presents a design framework of urban district carbon budgets and discusses the scope and scale of carbon budget allocation approaches. It also examines the emission reduction potential and co-benefits of the proposal.

  • 31.
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Distributed energy resource systems towards carbon-neutral urban development: A review and applicationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Energy Technology.
    Sustainable Cities Cooling: A Case of District Cooling System in Thailand2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Protogeropoulos, C.
    et al.
    Klonaris, I.
    Petrocheilos, C.
    Charitos, I.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Performance Evaluation of Different PV Module Technologies in a Grid-Connected Pilot Project in Greece2010In: 25nd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for increased penetration of Renewable Energy Sources and gradual decarbonisation ofthe energy supply chain is well established. Photovoltaic (PV) technology is constantly emerging as a key playerin the green energy generation market. Numerous PV technologies are competing for market share, making thechoice of the most suitable type of equipment essential for the viability of any application. In this study the reallifeperformance of four different PV technologies in actual southern Mediterranean climatic conditions wasexamined. A quality check of the recorded data throughout the monitoring period was carried out, followed bythe calculation of the performance indices proposed by the IEC 61724 international standard on PV systemperformance monitoring and analysis. The outdoor evaluation has shown that grid-connected PV systems canhave a major impact on the future energy mix of countries with high solar resources. The module technology thatwill claim a leading role in the PV industry will depend almost entirely on the future trends of manufacturing andproduction costs as well as, the BoS costs related to the final installation.

  • 34.
    Wang, Cong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Kilkis, Siir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology.
    Tjernström, Johan
    Akademiska hus.
    Nyblom, Jerker
    Akademiska hus.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Multi-objective optimization and parametric analysis of energy system designs for the Albano university campus in Stockholm2017In: Procedia Engineering, Elsevier, 2017, p. 621-630Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a multi-objective optimization approach is applied to the energy system design of the Albano university campus in Stockholm. The greenhouse gas emissions, the life cycle cost and the net exergy deficit of the campus are minimized, while the nearly zero energy requirements are respected. Four optimal solutions are identified based on those under equal importance, environment-oriented, economy-oriented, and exergy-oriented scenarios. The energy components of the four scenarios are analyzed and compared. A parametric analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of the variations in a number of economic, environmental and technical parameters on the composition of the optimal solution.

  • 35.
    Wang, Cong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Magny, Alessandro
    Multi-objective optimization of energy system designs for the Albano university campus in Stockholm2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a multi-objective optimization approach based on genetic algorithm is applied to the energy system design of a sustainable district – the new Albano university campus in Stockholm. The study aims to help district planners find optimal energy solutions that have good energy, environmental and economic performances. Three objectives are minimized: the non-renewable primary energy consumption, the greenhouse gas emissions, and the levelized life cycle cost. A wide range of energy conversion technologies and energy sources including both renewables and non-renewables have been modeled. The potential to recover waste heat from greywater and a prospective IT/Data center is analyzed. The energy system is modelled in steady-state and simulated in an hourly resolution with renewable energy production determined at real time. The optimization results are presented in the form of Pareto fronts, which helps district planners understand more clearly the trade-off between conflicting objectives and make more informed decisions.

  • 36.
    Wang, Cong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Magny, Alessandro
    Multi-objective robust optimization of energy systems for a sustainable district in Stockholm2015In: Proceedings of BS2015: 14th Conference of International Building Performance Simulation Association, Hyderabad, India, Dec. 7-9, 2015., 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies a multi-objective robust design optimization approach to the energy system design of a sustainable district. The life cycle cost and the greenhouse gas emissions are the two objectives that are minimized. In order to investigate the possbility to implement a nearly zero energy district, the nonrenewable primary energy consumption is kept below a certain value, handled as a constraint in the optimization. Through the proposed robust design optimization methodology, the robust Pareto optimal solutions are obtained, which are less sensitive than the deterministic ones to the uncertainties assumed in the selected most influential economic and technical paramers as well as design variables.

  • 37.
    Wang, Qian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    Martinac, Ivo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Service and Energy Systems.
    The application of LCCA toward industrialized building retrofitting: Case Studies of Swedish Residential Building Stock2013In: Sustainability in Energy and Buildings: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference in Sustainability in Energy and Buildings (SEB´12) / [ed] Anne Hakansson, Mattias Höjer, Robert J. Howlett,Lakhmi C Jain, Stockholm: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 931-946Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzed how industrialized building retrofitting measures contribute better decision supports for building retrofitting strategy to the energy saving potential from a Swedish building typology approach. Contributions to cost-effectiveness retrofitting from one distinguishing but major type of Swedish building stock in Stockholm, Sweden, one of which case was studied from a life cycle perspective as demonstrations for the introduced renovation alternatives. A basic life cycle costing tool coupled with building energy demand calculation was applied. The study focus on the relative costing impact mainly from retrofitting materials and building energy consumptions, as well as corresponding importance of the cost contribution from four  life cycle stages .

       The tool analyzes the retrofitting material costs and embodied energy consumption after undergoing proposed retrofitting work packages as regards as the relevant payback time simulation. For the case type of building stock, a retrofitting measure compounds in terms of various energy saving and architectural service refurbishments were introduced, the most costly measures could be the most cost-effectiveness alternatives in different life cycle stages based on the typology of the target building.

       Every building is unique and represents its own contexts, the proposed approach addresses getting an efficient general knowledge for the whole retrofitting and future building performance costs by life cycle thinking, aims at finding the similarities in Swedish building stock for providing greater resource-efficient, lower life cycle costing, simpler decision making and higher profitable building retrofitting strategy. 

1 - 37 of 37
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