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  • 1.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Aderklou, Christina
    Tholander, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Computational Literacy at Work: Children’s interaction with computational media2004In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age / [ed] Kinshuk, Demetrios G. Sampson, Pedro Isaías, 2004, p. 181-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the characteristics of children’s construction of dynamic systems in a school context. This is done through

    analyzing children’s activities when working hands on with a modelling task, and also through informal interviews and

    exhibitions where children described their work to peers and teachers who had not taken part in the activities. Our results

    suggest that handling the technology, relating to others, and negotiating ideas, are prominent aspects in these activities.

    Based on these results, we discuss the different activities involved in learning to create digital constructions and how

    these relate to several important topics that are emphasized in educational research that draws on socio-cultural

    perspectives on action and learning. These include the social context, the role of artefacts and technology, and the ability

    to articulate, express, and discuss.

  • 2. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Designing for programming as joint performances among groups of children2006In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1012-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on computer programming usually views the interactions as mostly cognitively based, with focus on concepts such as memory, perception and conceptual understanding. However, the current trend towards embodied and social perspectives on interaction provides an alternative way of looking at interactive processes, instead emphasising aspects such as social and physical performance with and around technology. We have explored a range of activities and tools that explicitly address these aspects in programming, with a specific focus on children's making of own computer games and simulations. We exemplify this work through three different situations where tools and activities are used by children as recourses for building of interactive systems, while at the same time allowing for bodily action in negotiation of design ideas. We discuss how situations like these may provide directions for new technologies for programming as well as methodological developments in the area of interaction design.

  • 3. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Finding Design Qualities in a Tangible programming space2006In: CHI '06 Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human Factors in computing systems, 2006, p. 447-456Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reflect upon the process of developing a tangible space for children's collaborative construction of screen-based systems. As in all design work, the design process involved continual refinements of initial ideas and their practical realisation. We discuss how some widely held assumptions often put forward with tangible interfaces were given up in favour of reaching overall goals of interaction. In particular our design involved a shift from a focus on persistent representation and readability of tangible code structures, to instead focus on achieving reusability of programming resources. On a general level, our results illustrate a view on tangibles as resources for action instead of only as alternative forms of data representation. Importantly, this view includes action directed towards the computer as well as off-line socially oriented action conducted with the tangible artefacts.

  • 4. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    "Looking At the Computer but Doing It on Land": Children’s Interactions in a Tangible Programming Space2005In: People and Computers XIX: The Bigger Picture, 2005, p. 3-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a tangible programming space designed for children's collaborative construction of screen-based interactive systems. The design is based on three goals for interaction and activity: supporting co-located collaborative activity, screen-based execution, and what we call behaviour-based programming. Further, we analyse the interactions within a group of 10 year olds who used the system to create a live fantasy world together. The results show how the tangible resources shaped the activity of programming so that bodily actions and positioning became prominent. This is conceptualized through the notion of embodied programming, which highlights how programming activity must be understood through its interlinking to external resources and context.

  • 5.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Södertörn University College.
    Jonsson, Martin
    Södertörn University College.
    Beyond representations: Towards an action-centric perspective on tangible interaction2008In: International Journal of Arts and Technology, ISSN 1754-8853, E-ISSN 1754-8861, Vol. 1, no 3/4, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the light of theoretical as well as concrete technical development, we discuss a conceptual shift from an information-centric to an action-centric perspective on tangible interactive technology. We explicitly emphasise the qualities of shareable use, and the importance of designing tangibles that allow for meaningful manipulation and control of the digital material. This involves a broadened focus from studying properties of the interface, to instead aim for qualities of the activity of using a system, a general tendency towards designing for social and sharable use settings and an increased openness towards multiple and subjective interpretations. An effect of this is that tangibles are not designed as representations of data, but as resources for action. We discuss four ways that tangible artefacts work as resources for action: (1) for physical manipulation; (2) for referential, social and contextually oriented action; (3) for perception and sensory experience; (4) for digitally mediated action.

  • 6. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Jonsson, Martin
    Towards a new set of ideals: Consequences of the practice turn in tangible interaction2008In: TEI'08 - Second International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction - Conference Proceedings, ACM Press, 2008, p. 223-230Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The practice-oriented turn in social sciences has implied a series of fundamental consequences and design challenges for HCI in general, and particularly in tangible interaction research. This could be interpreted as a move away from scientific ideals based on a modernist tradition, reflected in four contemporary themes in tangible interaction research. The first theme concerns a shift from an information centric to an action centric perspective on interaction. The second concerns a broadened focus from studying properties of the system, to instead aim at supporting qualities of the activity of using a system. The third concerns the general shift towards supporting sharable use, rather than primarily individual use settings. The last theme concerns the shift towards multiple and subjective interpretation of how to use new technological artefacts. We discuss how these themes are grounded in theoretical as well as more concrete technical developments in the area of tangible computing.

  • 7.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Jonsson, M.
    KTH.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH.
    Tholander, Jakob
    KTH.
    Robertson, T.
    Marti, P.
    Svanæs, D.
    Peterson, M. G.
    Forlizzi, J.
    Schiphorst, T.
    Isbister, K.
    Hummels, C.
    Klooster, S.
    Loke, L.
    Khut, G.
    Move to be moved2016In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery , 2016, p. 3301-3308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based design is reaching critical mass in HCI, and we can start to identify strategies, similarities and differences in how it is approached. Similarities may include, for example, a strong first person perspective on design, emphasising movement, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, as well as starting from the premise that our bodily ways of being in the world are shaped by the ecologies of people, cultural practices and the artefacts we create and use. Different classes of systems are starting to emerge, such as spurring somaesthetic appreciation processes using biofeedback loops or carefully nudging us to interact with our own movements; engaging us in affective loops where the technology takes on a stronger agency, attempting to pull participants into particular experiences; extending on our senses and perception - even creating new senses through technology; social interactions, engaging us to jointly explore movement or touch; even endowing machines with their own 'somatics', exploring our relationship to technology; as well as engaging in larger political issues around the body, such as gender perspectives, or challenging the mind-body divide.

  • 8.
    Tholander, Jakob
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Children's perspectives in a game programming discourse2005In: The Journal of Interactive Learning Research, ISSN 1093-023X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 51-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Playground project, we applied a constructionist learning perspective in order to build a computational learning environment in which children could design and build their own video games. In this paper, we present results from a study where children were given semi-structured programming tasks in an adventure game designed to investigate their understanding of program mechanisms. We analyze two children's solutions and approaches to a task as a matter of adaptation of talk and actions to different perspectives involved in the ongoing discourse. The establishment of a common perspective between child and investigator throughout the work sessions proved to be central to how the children approached their work. The analysis showed that in order for children to learn to understand how mechanisms that control a game work, they must learn to adapt their perspective to the expectations of each subtask and to the task as a whole. We show how one child is able to see the expected perspective in each subtask, whereas the other child finds that this is much harder. The support given by the investigators was also of great importance in facilitating these processes.

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