Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rahm, M.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rocket scientist for a day: Investigating alternatives for chemical propulsion2012In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1301-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This laboratory experiment introduces rocket science from a chemistry perspective. The focus is set on chemical propulsion, including its environmental impact and future development. By combining lecture-based teaching with practical, theoretical, and computational exercises, the students get to evaluate different propellant alternatives. To complete the task, they need to use several important curricular concepts, such as the breaking and formation of bonds, redox reactions, and thermodynamics. They also apply basic computational electronic structure calculations to investigate the energetic content of hitherto nonexisting alternatives. Finally, actual chemical rocket propulsion is demonstrated through the assembly and testing of a model rocket motor, employing a commercially available kit. The full experiment was developed for upper-level high school classes and is completed in a 3-h lab period. The experiment, or parts of it, has also been successfully used both in undergraduate programs and continuing education for teachers. 

  • 2.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    A comparison of Swedish and Irish secondary students’ conceptions of engineers and engineering using the Draw-an-Engineer Test2019In: 126th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Engineering education research methods to determine conceptions of engineers and of engineering2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Hyland, Tomás
    University of Limerick.
    Seery, Niall
    Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Pears, Arnold
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Investigating perceptions of intelligence as an approach to understanding female representation in technology and engineering education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Athlone Institute of Technology.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    On intelligence in technology education: Towards redefining technological capability2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Technology subject in general post-primary education is unique based on its conception and treatment of knowledge. The task specific utility of knowledge is emphasised and at the same time, in reflection of the breadth of technology in society, the variance in the context of learning tasks can be quite large. The subject is considered to have a fluid epistemology which directly affects how capability is contextually defined. The concept of technological capability has been ascribed multiple definitions however the more commonly aligned with model suggests it refers to a synthesis of knowledge, skills, values and problem solving in a technological context. However the combination of knowledge, skills, values and problem solving neglects to acknowledge intelligence in the form of domain general abilities which have been observed to have a significant effect on student performance. Therefore this paper argues for the integration of contextually relevant domain general abilities with current conceptions of technological capability.

  • 6.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Visualization, inductive reasoning, and memory span as components of fluid intelligence: Implications for technology education2018In: International Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0883-0355, E-ISSN 1873-538X, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 64-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leadership and Pedagogical Change: Accidental, Ad‐Hoc, or Arranged?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Henriksson, Ann-Sofie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Leading for pedagogical change2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    de Vries, Marc
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Delft University of Technology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Pre-university Education: An introduction2016In: Pre-university Engineering Education / [ed] de Vries, M., Gumaelius, L & Skogh, I-B., Sense Publisher: Springer , 2016, 1st, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    de Vries, Marc J.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Skogh, Inga-Britt (Editor)
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE). Delft university of Technology.
    Pre-university Engineering Education:2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Operationalising pedagogical content knowledge research in technology education: Considerations for methodological approaches to exploring enacted practice2019In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many areas of curricula internationally, technology education has encountered difficulties in achieving continuity between the rhetoric of prevailing policy and the reality of enacted practices. In technology education, the conceptually oriented nature of curricular goals is theorised to play a significant part in influencing this relationship. One way in which investigations of this relationship have been approached is considering the application of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks as a mechanism to understand the interaction of teachers’ knowledge and enacted practices. However, understanding from the philosophy of technology, and the technology education literature, suggests that technology education treats knowledge differently to many other disciplines. As a result of this, the interactions between teachers’ beliefs and knowledge are theorised to play a more significant role in influencing enacted practice in technology education. Building on this perspective, this article considers the need to investigate the roles of teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, and the interactions between these, in the investigation of enacted practice. Further to this, the article problematises the potential for a dominance of exploratory research, though acknowledging the need for research within different paradigms; a common frame of reference is advocated. In advocating a more holistic approach to investigating enacted practice, and the factors which may influence teachers’ enactment of teaching practice, it is envisioned that this article takes a step towards methodological coherence regarding the study of enacted practice in technology education.

  • 12.
    Doyle, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone, Ireland..
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Canty, Donal
    University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland..
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Reconceptualising PCK research in D&T education:proposing a methodological framework to investigateenacted practice2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since first conceived, the concept of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) hasattracted much attention. Despite being lauded by educationalists as the unique knowledgebase of teachers, research on the concept over the past 30 years has yet to result in a universallyaccepted definition being presented. Much of the contentions surrounding the lack ofan agreed upon conception appear to have stemmed from difficulties in understanding therelationship between PCK, other areas of teacher knowledge, teacher beliefs, and enactedpractice. This paper considers the application of PCK frameworks to design and technology(D&T) education, through an analysis of the nature of the discipline from an ontologicaland epistemological perspective and contemporary perspectives on the construct of PCK.It is theorised that the volition afforded to teachers in D&T through weakly framed subjectboundaries negates the effective application of PCK frameworks, as teachers’ beliefs have agreater impact on enacted practices. In an attempt to better understanding enacted practicein D&T education, the paper proposes a methodological framework centred on the interactionsbetween teachers’ beliefs and knowledge in the discipline, through synthesising theconcept of amplifiers and filters of practice with the nature of D&T education. The proposedframework outlines the need to recognise individual teachers’ conception of capabilityas a critical influence on enacted practice.

  • 13.
    Fahrman, Birgit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Technology education in primary school in Sweden: A study of teachers views on teaching strategies and subject content2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, Vol. 122, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Fahrman, Birgit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Experienced technology teachers' teaching practices2019In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers' teaching practice plays a key role in the learning process of pupils, and for teaching to be successful, teachers must have knowledge in many different fields. This obviously also applies to teaching the subject technology. However, lower secondary school technology education in Sweden has reportedly been described in terms of teaching not following the curriculum along with widespread uncertainty among teachers regarding how to design their teaching practices. To address this national challenge, we need to understand the existing technology teaching practice. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore the considerations experienced technology teachers make. The study is based on interviews with technology teachers who work in lower secondary school (13--15-year-old pupils). The collected data consist of teacher's statements regarding their own expertise and teaching practice. To visualize the described teaching practice we have analysed collected data through the lens of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The results show both similarities and differences in the teachers' descriptions. Speaking in terms of PCK, the purpose and teaching focus expressed by the respondents, framed within the category `Orientations to teach technology', vary considerably. However, regarding `instructional strategies', the consensus among those experienced teachers is striking. Experienced technology teachers' teaching practices are proven to provide valuable information about the subject's potential, and the findings offer a basis for the future development of the subject of technology as well as future teacher education and professional development courses.

  • 15.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Almqvist, M.
    Árnadóttir, A.
    Axelsson, A.
    Conejero, J. A.
    García-Sabater, J. P.
    Klitgaard, L.
    Kozma, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, House of Science.
    Maheut, J.
    Marin-Garcia, J.
    Mickos, H.
    Nilsson, P. -O
    Norén, A.
    Pinho-Lopes, M.
    Prenzel, M.
    Ray, J.
    Roxå, T.
    Voss, M.
    Outreach initiatives operated by universities for increasing interest in science and technology2016In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, the low number of students choosing to study science and technology in higher education has been on the societal agenda and many initiatives have been launched to promote awareness regarding career options. The initiatives particularly focus on increasing enrolment in the engineering programmes. This article describes and compares eight European initiatives that have been established and operated by universities (and in some cases through collaboration with other actors in society). Each initiative is summarised in a short essay that discusses motivation, organisation, pedagogical approach, and activities. The initiatives are characterised by comparing the driving forces behind their creation, how the initiative activities relate to the activities at the university, size based on the number of participants and cost per participant and pedagogical framework. There seem to be two main tracks for building outreach activities, one where outreach activities are based on the university's normal activities, and one where outreach activities are designed specifically for the visiting students.

  • 16.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Fahrman, Birgit
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology teachers' views on general pedagogical knowledge2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Teachers’ views regarding assessment in technology education2013In: Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability / [ed] P John Williams, Waikato: University of Waikato , 2013, p. 196-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that there is a lack of certified technology teachers in Swedish schools.

    In this study we explore possible differences between teachers with and without subject-specific education in technology didactics. The research question highlights to what extent teachers with subject-specific training (1) are using steering documents and (2) assessing students differently compared to teachers without academic subject-specific training. The collected data consists of a survey within a large teacher-training project ‘Tekniklyftet’, a technology initiative in which 28 schools in the Stockholm area have signed up for an ambitious technology education development program in their school.

    The results show that teachers with subject-specific training perceive themselves as more secure in their professional (technology) teacher role and express greater confidence in how to assess pupils in the subject of technology and also in how to use steering documents compared to non-subject specific trained teachers. 

  • 18.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Hartell, Eva
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Learning in Engineering Sciences.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Outcome analyses of educational interventions: a case study of the Swedish “Boost of Technology” intervention2018In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 739-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there have been multiple large scale interventions to support compulsory school teachers generally and within specific subjects. Due to the costs associated with such interventions it is critical that interim evaluation measures exist which can indicate potential success. Additionally, evaluation measures which can measure the actual impact of interventions relative to their intended aim are also needed as validation tools. The Swedish regional 'Tekniklyftet' or 'Boost of Technology' project which ran from 2011 to 2013 is presented here as a case study exploring evaluation measures for educational interventions in technology education. Three different evaluation approaches were used as measures of the intended outcomes of the intervention. These included (1) analysing the preconditions which exist in schools for teachers of Technology, (2) analysing the use of local long term technology education planning documents (school work plans) developed during the intervention, and (3) analysing the potential change over time in student performance in Technology based on national grades at the end of compulsory school. The findings gained from each approach indicate that the Boost of Technology project was a success. However, there were shortcomings associated with each approach. They are therefore discussed in the Swedish context with the intention to support future international stakeholders in the evaluation of interventions aspiring to develop technology education.

  • 19.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Isaksson Persson, Helena
    CDIO implementation in Swedish upper secondary education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, Anette
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Outreach and attractiveness – a never ending story or a new approach?2016In: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 585-588Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kozma, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, House of Science.
    How can peer teaching be used for inspiration and education in science and technology at universities – a case study from Stockholm House of Science2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Lee, Y.
    Morimura, K.
    Kolmos, A.
    The role of entrepreneurial skills in engineering education: A case study performed in Denmark, Japan, Korea and Sweden2017In: Proceedings of the 45th SEFI Annual Conference 2017 - Education Excellence for Sustainability, SEFI 2017, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2017, p. 593-602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of teaching entrepreneurial skills has been on the agenda for several years. But how do engineering education institutes (EEIs) serve as institutions facilitating the learning of these skills? In this study, we compare four EEIs from four countries located in two global regions, East Asia and the Northern Europe, in order to identify models for how education in entrepreneurship can be implemented according to each country's situation. We use a modified version of Dahlöf and Lundgren's frame-factor theory to analyse how the universities understand the internal and external driving forces for the development of this kind of education. We also address how these frame factors affect the development processes at each EEI. The study identifies differences in these processes, which depend on how pressures originating outside the universities are expressed.

  • 23.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Norström, Per
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Difficulties and opportunities when teaching about technological systems in K-122015In: 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society, American Society for Engineering Education , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-technical systems are studied in compulsory school (pupils aged 7–16) in Sweden. The purpose is to increase pupils’ understanding of how technology and society affect one another by highlighting the interaction between technological artefacts, humans, institutions, and society at large. Many teachers find this subject difficult to teach, and therefore avoid it. To rectify this, a course module about socio-technical systems for teachers was instigated at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. This study was conducted during that course, and shows that teachers are affected by their educational backgrounds in their understanding of the systems; those who are trained in social sciences prioritize different aspects of the systems in their teaching than do those who have started out in the natural sciences. It also shows that the formulation of learning objectives in this area is very difficult for most teachers and few students include goals that relate to more general knowledge in areas such as genderrelated issues, historical aspects or environmental issues. Few of the students showed the ability to create a varied learning environment; searching information on the Internet and writing reports dominate the students’ suggestions. Understanding of socio-technical systems has the potential to bridge the gap between engineering and various aspects of society in education. It is therefore an essential part of technological literacy, and teacher training in the area should be improved.

  • 24.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark, Tanja
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The role of ‘Teknikåttan’– a competition aimed at increasing interest in science and technology for grade 8 students.2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1993, Swedish technical universities have engaged 15-year-old students and their teachers in the annual tournament “Teknikåttan” (technology for students in school year eight), which is aimed at increasing students’ interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, as well as at making them aware of career possibilities within these areas. Given its large number of participating students, Teknikåttan offers a unique opportunity to study students’ understanding of and interest in STEM subjects by analysing the results collected for the participating students. This paper gives a description of the Teknikåttan tournament and presents an analysis of the results from the first round of the 2014 tournament. The data collected came from the answers of students in the Stockholm region. All questions were characterised according to three parameters, which were used to analyse answers to high-score and low-score questions and differences in answers according to gender. The analysis indicates that a difference exists in answers according to gender, such that boys scored higher than girls overall, but that girls scored higher in questions related to the subject of biology. Finally, a possible expansion of the analysis involving future tournaments is discussed.

  • 25.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Nymark-Kramer, T.
    The Technology-Eight Competition: An Analysis of Year 8 Students' Quiz Results2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Pre-university Engineering Education Research at a University of Technology: A Case Study of the Pre-university Engineering Initiatives at KTH2016In: Pre-university Engineering Education / [ed] de Vries, M., Gumaelius, L. & Skogh, I-B., Sense Publisher: Springer, 2016, 1st, p. 237-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Work plans in technology: A study of technology education practice in Sweden2015In: Chatoney, M. (Ed.) Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design and Technology Education, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Arbeta med komparativ bedömning2018In: Skola och samhälle, E-ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Doyle, Andrew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Teachers’ attitudes towards teaching programming in Swedish Technology education.2019In: Developing a knowledge economy trough technology and engineering education: PATT37, Msida, Malta. 3–6 June, 2019. / [ed] Sarah Pulé & Marc J. de Vries, Msida, Malta: University of Malta , 2019, p. 195-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Programming was introduced as a core-content in the Swedish national curriculum during a 2018 revision. The introduction of programming as part of Technology and Mathematics has been surrounded with a lot of questions of how, when, what and by whom programming should be taught. It is acknowledged that teachers do not often have the content expertise or confidence in teaching ‘new’ topics as they are assigned to curricula. Previous research has explored this through the lens of teacher self-efficacy, where results have indicated that teachers’ self-efficacy in a particular area is important for creating effective learning opportunities for pupils in school. 

    This paper reports on preliminary findings from an on-going project focusing on teacher self-efficacy in relation to the introduction of programming to the primary Technology curriculum. The projects’ objectives were to increase teachers' self-efficacy to teach programming in the Technology subject, and as a result of this, increase learning opportunities for the pupils. 

    In order to be able to measure teachers’ development of self-efficacy towards teaching primary programming an instrument was developed based on an existing instrument used for measuring self-efficacy for science teaching. The Dimensions of Attitudes towards Programming (DAP) instrument was designed and piloted in two schools. The preliminary findings show that the DAP-instrument fulfilled its purpose within this project but needs to be further validated to become a valid instrument to measure teachers’ self-efficacy in programming in a broader sense. Two themes identified from the analysis are discussed in this paper; (1) a lack of confidence in teaching programming, which appeared to ultimately result in, (2) teachers’ questioning the why behind teaching programming in the Swedish primary school.

  • 30.
    Hartell, Eva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Svärdh, Joakim
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Investigating technology teachers’ self-efficacy on assessment2015In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 321-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores possible differences in the views on assessment between two groups of teachers teaching technology in compulsory school: 1) teachers with subject-specific teacher training in technology education; and 2) teachers without such training. This topic is of particular interest because of the recent changes in the regulations that govern compulsory schools in Sweden, such that only certified teachers now will be permitted to teach and assign grades, despite the clear lack of certified teachers in technology education. The study is situated in two fields of interest—technology education and assessment. Both topics are highly relevant, especially in combination, because previous research on teachers’ assessment practices in technology is rare. In this study, the goal is to contribute to deepening the understanding of how subject-specific teacher training affects teachers’ ability to assess students’ knowledge while maintaining alignment with stated regulations. The results show significant difference between these two groups’ use of curriculum documents as the basis of their teaching and their self-efficacy in assessing student’s knowledge in technology. The results suggest interesting possibilities for curriculum alignment and indicate that the opportunities for student learning increase according to whether teachers are specifically trained in the subject. 

  • 31.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lujara, Suzan
    Univ Dar Es Salaam, UDSM, Coll Informat & Commun Technol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Understanding Engineering Education Change With The Introduction of Challenge Driven Education in Tanzania2018In: PROCEEDINGS OF 2018 IEEE GLOBAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION CONFERENCE (EDUCON) - EMERGING TRENDS AND CHALLENGES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION, IEEE , 2018, p. 1335-1343Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Tanzania have collaborated since 1976 in research projects. A PhD sandwich program was established in the 90's in the field of electrical engineering between UDSM (University of Dar es Salam), Tanzania and KTH (Royal Institute of Technology), Sweden. This collaboration has opened up for shared trust, idea exchange and the emergence of the challenge driven education approach. Challenge driven education brings in socio-technical challenges to engineering education, or rather, brings out students and academic faculty, to real life challenges outside academy. The research of the first years' experience reveals factors like high motivation among students, faculty and stakeholders in society. New ways of teaching and learning have evolved, and clear contrasts with traditional education have been found.

  • 32.
    Inga-Britt, Skogh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Education for Sustainable Development in Compulsory School Technology Education: A problem inventory2013In: Technology Education for the Future: A Play on Sustainability / [ed] P John Williams, Waikato: University of Waikato, New Zealand , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Awareness of sustainability issues is increasingly demanded in society. Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is a requirement stated in the Swedish curriculum. Findings (Schools Inspectorate, 2012) indicate considerable variations in how teachers in Sweden work with value related issues. It is also found that schools/teachers commonly lack a holistic approach and a common stance in this assignment. Reportedly ESD seems dependent on the personal interests and abilities of individual teachers (ibid.). In order to develop teaching about sustainable development within the Technology subject we need knowledge about how ESD is carried out today (content and work methods). We also need to know how the concept of sustainability is interpreted by concerned key actors in schools (teachers and principals). During the spring of 2013 a pilot study focusing technology teachers’ work with sustainable development within their technology classes is being performed. Based on interviews (teachers and principals) we analyze what are perceived to be the main difficulties associated with the integration of sustainability into technology education. Findings confirm previous research stating that knowledge about sustainability is vague among teachers. Most teachers and principals in the study are primarily (in some cases only) aware of the environmental/ecological aspect of sustainability. The study also points to a discrepancy between perceived and actual need for improving teachers’ competence in ESD. Since ESD is not well defined, fully understood and established among those responsible for the actual teaching there is an evident risk of ESD being treated as ‘one further requirement’ rather than as the asset it actually represents to technology education. It is suggested is that the planning, organization and implementation of future ESD efforts must be coordinated carefully with all concerned parties in advance and be supported more substantially than previous efforts.

  • 33.
    Kyambadde, Joseph
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Kansiime, Frank
    Makerere University .
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    A comparative study of Cyperus papyrus and Miscanthidium violaceum-based constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment in a tropical climate2004In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 475-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The treatment efficiencies of constructed wetlands containing Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus) and Miscanthidium violaceum (K. Schum.) Robyns (synonymous with Miscanthus violaceum (K. Schum) Pilg.) were investigated in a tropical climate (Kampala, Uganda). Papyrus showed higher ammonium-nitrogen and total reactive phosphorus (TRP) removal (75.3% and 83.2%) than Miscanthidium (61.5% and 48.4%) and unplanted controls (27.9% ammonium-nitrogen). No TRP removal was detected in control effluent. Nutrients (N and P) were significantly higher (p < 0.015) in papyrus than Miscanthidium plant tissues. Plant uptake and storage was the major factor responsible for N and P removal in treatment line 2 (papyrus) where it contributed 69.5% N and 88.8% P of the total N and P removed. It however accounted for only 15.8% N and 30.7% P of the total N and P removed by treatment line 3 (Miscanthidium violaceum). In addition, papyrus exhibited a significantly larger (p = 0.000) number of adventitious roots than Miscanthidium. Nitrifying bacteria attached to papyrus (2.15 x 10(6) +/- 1.53 x 10(5) MPN/g DW) and Miscanthidium roots (1.30 x 10(4) +/- 8.83 x 10(2) MPN/g DW) and the corresponding nitrification activities were consistent with this finding. Epiphytic nitrifiers appeared more important for total nitrification than those in peat or suspended in water. Papyrus root structures provided more microbial attachment sites, sufficient wastewater residence time, trapping and settlement of suspended particles, surface area for pollutant adsorption, uptake, assimilation in plant tissues and oxygen for organic and inorganic matter oxidation in the rhizosphere, accounting for its high treatment efficiency.

  • 34.
    Kyambadde, Joseph
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Kansiime, Frank
    Makerere University.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hydraulic loading, stability and water quality of Nakivubo wetland, Uganda2004In: African Journal of Aquatic Science, ISSN 1608-5914, E-ISSN 1727-9364, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nakivubo wetland, which has performed tertiary water treatment for Kampala city for the past 40 years, is ecologically stressed by agricultural and infrastructural developments. Field studies were carried out to assess the hydraulic loading, pollution profile, stability and water quality of this wetland. The upper and lower Nakivubo wetland receive 4.13-7.66 x 104 and 3.50-10.32 X 104m3/day of water respectively, of which 48.3-57.9% of total hydraulic loading to the upper wetland was carried by sampling station S1. The influent water to the upper wetland had a total BOD5 and NH4-N loading ranging from 2.6-4.4 x 103kg BOD/day and 0.79-1.68 x 103kg NH4-N/day respectively. The National Water and Sewerage Corporation's effluent constituted a large proportion of BOD and NH4-N loading into Nakivubo wetland. Zinc, copper and chromium were detected in trace amounts at most sampling stations. However, lead was occasionally detected at Kibira channel (station S5) at a concentration of 0.4mg/l, which is higher than the permitted Ugandan discharge limit of 0.1mg/l (NEMA 1999). The wetland showed a very high removal efficiency for BOD, ranging from 77.4%-86.3%, compared to ammonium-N which ranged from -66.1% to 33.1% indicating limitations with the nitrification process. A low self-purification for zinc, copper and chromium was also observed in the upper Nakivubo wetland, possibly due to poor plant-wastewater interaction resulting from wetland drainage. In the lower Nakivubo wetland conductivity and dissolved oxygen were generally higher in papyrus- than in Miscanthidium-vegetated zones. However, the BOD and ammonium-N loadings did not vary significantly (P = 0.217 and P = 0.359 respectively) between the two vegetated zones.

  • 35.
    Larsdotter, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    Norström, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    Jansen, Jes La Cour
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, Superseded Departments.
    A small scale hydroponics wastewater treatment system under Swedish conditions2003In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 161-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A treatment plant using conventional biological treatment combined with hydroponics and microalgae is constructed in a greenhouse in the area of Stockholm, Sweden. The treatment plant is built for research purposes and presently treats 0.559 m(3) of domestic wastewater from the surrounding area per day. The system uses anoxic pre-denitrification followed by aerobic tanks for nitrification and plant growth. A microalgal step further reduces phosphorus, and a final sand filter polishes the water. During a three week period in July 2002 the treatment capacity of this system was evaluated with respect to removal of organic matter, phosphorus and nitrogen. 90% COD removal was obtained early in the system. Nitrification and denitrification was well established with total nitrogen reduction of 72%. Phosphorus was removed by 47% in the process. However, higher phosphorus removal values are expected as the microalgal step will be further developed. The results show that acceptable treatment can be achieved using this kind of system. Further optimisation of the system will lead to clean water as well as valuable plants to be harvested from the nutrient rich wastewater.

  • 36.
    Leta, Seyoum
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Assefa, F.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Biological nitrogen and organic matter removal from tannery wastewater in pilot plant operations in Ethiopia2004In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 333-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to set-up a pilot plant and to evaluate its effectiveness for biological nitrogen and organic matter removal from tannery wastewater in Ethiopia. A pilot wastewater treatment plant consisting of a predenitrification-nitrification process was constructed and operated for 6 months. This was fed with a raw tannery wastewater obtained from the Modjo Tannery located 70 km south of the capital, Addis Ababa. Up to 98% total nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand, and 95% ammonium nitrogen removal efficiencies were achieved in the system. The average effluent ammonium nitrogen ranged from 8.4 mg l(-1) to 86.0 mg l(-1), whereas the average effluent for nitrate nitrogen ranged from 2.9 mg l(-1) to 4.4 mg l(-1). The average values of denitrification and nitrification rates determined by nitrate and ammonium uptake rates (NUR and AUR) were 8.0 mg NO3-N [g volatile suspended solids (VSS)](-1) h(-1) and 5.4 mg NH4-N (g VSS)(-1) h(-1), respectively, demonstrating that the treatment processes of the pilot plant were effective. Further studies of the effect of chromium III on AUR showed 50% inhibition at a concentration of 85 mg l(-1), indicating that this metal was not causing process inhibition during performance operations. Thus, the predenitrification-nitrification process was found to be efficient for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic substrates from tannery wastewaters.

  • 37.
    Leta, Seyoum
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Assefa, F.
    Dalhammar, Gunnel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    dentification of efficient denitrifying bacteria from tannery wastewaters in Ethiopia and a study of the effects of chromium III and sulphide on their denitrification rate2004In: World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology, ISSN 0959-3993, E-ISSN 1573-0972, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to identify potential microorganisms with high denitrifying capacity from tannery wastewaters, 1000 pure cultures of bacterial isolates from Modjo Tannery Pilot and Ethio-tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), in Ethiopia, were investigated. Twenty-eight isolates were selected as efficient denitrifiers. These were Gram-negative rods, oxidase and catalase positive denitrifying organisms. The 28 denitrifying strains were further classified according to their biochemical fingerprints into three different phylogenetic groups (BPT1, BPT2 and BPT3) and seven singles. Isolates B79(T), B11, B12, B15, B28 and B38 belonging to the BPT3 cluster were found to be the most efficient denitrifying bacteria. All phenotypic studies, including cellular fatty acid profiles, showed that the 6 BPT3 isolates were closely related to each other. The 16S rRNA partial sequence analysis of type strain B79(T) (CCUG 45880) indicated a sequence similarity of 99% to Brachymonas denitrificans JCM9216 (D14320) in the beta-subdivision of proteobacteria. Further studies of the effects of chromium III and sulphide on the six Brachymonas denitrificans strains indicated that denitrification by the isolates were inhibited 50% at concentrations of 54 and 96 mg/l, respectively. The efficient isolates characterized in this study are of great value because of their excellent denitrifying properties and relatively high tolerance to the concentrations of toxic compounds (70 mg chromium/l and 160 mg sulphide/l) prevailing in tannery wastewaters.

  • 38.
    Magnell, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Geschwind, Lars
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena B.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Kolmos, A. J.
    Faculty approaches to working life issues in engineering curricula2014In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify faculty approaches to working life issues in engineering education. The paper focuses on faculty attitudes towards working life issues and their integration into the curriculum and on activities related to working life introduced to the curriculum. We used a mixed methods approach and performed a survey and interviews at a single faculty research intensive technical university in Sweden. The results show that faculty members are positive towards integrating issues from working life into the curriculum. The findings show no support for the academic drift hypothesis, at least not as regards staff drift. The findings also show that faculty members with more work experience outside academia are more interested in including work related issues in their teaching, while faculty with less work experience are less interested. Faculty rate critical thinking, problem solving, new solutions and technical knowledge as the most important knowledge, skills and competences in the engineering profession. The most common ways to integrate working life issues are to use examples from their own work experience, guest lectures or case studies, while programs with more extensive connections to industry offer more integrated activities, e.g. projects with industry. Programs with more extensive connections to industry also seem to use professional contacts established through research in their teaching.

  • 39.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Grøm, Audun
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Munkebo Hussmann, Peter
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Karvinen, Meeri
    Keskinen, Marko
    Knutson Wedel, Maria
    Lundqvist, Ulrika
    Lyng, Reidar
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Nygaard, Mads
    Vigild, Martin
    Fruergaard Astrup, Thomas
    Mapping the CDIO Syllabus to the UNESCO key competencies for sustainability2019In: Proceedings of the 15th International CDIO Conference, Aarhus University, June 25-27, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a framework of key competencies for sustainability defined by UNESCO is used to evaluate the relevance of the CDIO Syllabus for promoting engineering education for sustainable development. The evaluation is performed in two steps. First, topics, terms and concepts in the CDIO Syllabus that corresponds to the different UNESCO key competencies are identified. The second step is a qualitative discussion where areas of strong mapping are highlighted and aspects that could be better visualized or strengthened in, or added to, the Syllabus are identified. Differences in definitions of various concepts between the CDIO Syllabus and the UNESCO key competencies and the overall relation between the two frameworks are discussed. It is concluded that the CDIO Syllabus is rather well aligned with the UNESCO framework, however several opportunities (not to say needs) for strengthening the Syllabus in relation to the key competencies are identified. The UNESCO key competencies are found to be useful instruments for scrutinizing and updating the CDIO Syllabus. Other opportunities for knowledge and methods transfer between the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) domain and the Engineering Education domain are identified. The paper is proposed to be used as basis for updating the CDIO Syllabus into a version 3.0 for maintaining its relevance in a changing world.

  • 40.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    Wyss, Ramon
    Vasell, Jesper
    Lujara, Susan
    Connecting North and South through Challenge Driven Education2018In: Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO Conference, Kanazawa, Japan, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes with a north-south perspective on the ongoing enhancement of engineering education for sustainable development by giving insights in and results from implementation of challenge driven education (CDE) through joint efforts by the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) and other African partner universities. CDE is explained as an evolution of PBL for building learning experiences around societal challenges, engaging external stakeholders, and developing students’ abilities to contribute to sustainable development. A case study is presented where students’, teachers’ and challenge owners’ perceptions of a challenge driven approach in engineering education are explored and key drivers and barriers for implementing CDE are clarified.

  • 41. Seery, N
    et al.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Pears, Arnold Neville
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Multidisciplinary teaching: The emergence of an holistic STEM teacher2019In: Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This full research paper approaches the teaching of STEM from a new multi-disciplinary perspective. While the importance of the STEM agenda is not in dispute, the plurality in treatment of STEM as individual subjects or disciplinary areas of study potentially limits the evolution of a new conception of STEM education. In this paper, determinist disciplined learning is challenged through the advocacy of a learning science agenda, which we argue from the perspective of modern teacher education.Unintentionally, our educational systems and structures can create a silo-effect, sometimes impeding the development of multi and trans-disciplinary competencies. This paper advances an argument for a conception of teacher education that supports the development of the holistic STEM teacher. Our conception of the holistic STEM educator revolves around central themes focused on building, manipulating and synthesising STEM specific attitudes, skills and knowledge. The proximal and distal effects are also considered in subsequent discussion.This paper does not propose a generalist teacher, as the significance of content knowledge as a critical component of teacher efficacy is not contested. On the contrary, it considers an unbounded and applied perspective to the treatment of STEM with implications for an enhanced comprehension of abstracted knowledge and support for a more robust construction of meaning. The vision of a STEM teacher is articulated with respect to position, treatment and competencies intending to qualify and sustain the STEM agenda through pragmatic action.

  • 42.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Technology Teachers as Researchers: The TUFF Experience2012In: Explorations of best practice in Technology, Design & Engineering Education: Volume 2, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf